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3:58
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3:00
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 27, 2001
  • Release Date: March 27, 2001
  • Label: Motown
  • Copyright: (C) 2001 Universal Records Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 37:01
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001NZCK2C
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #96,236 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
"Coffy" has been one of my favorite movies for a very long time and I would have dreams of owning a copy of the soundtrack, and guess what, dreams DO come true! Although a bit pricey, worth every damn penny! Move over Shaft and Superfly, every track is pure quality jazz, for real, Roy Ayers is a genious. Another good thing is that it's not overplayed like the other two soundtracks mentioned (why is released in Japan and not here?). It's great mood music, especially for playing cards and cocktail parties, everyone loves it (and if they don't, they need to go!). The best tracks I believe are Aragon (as heard in "Jackie Brown"), Coffy is the Color, Coffy Baby and, of course, King George. Please do not look past this treasure!
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Format: Audio CD
Years of listening have really helped me to appreciate how jazz,blues,soul,rock and Afrocentric world music's joined together in,so many combinations, under the banner of funk. Having been listening to Roy Ayers for a long time now? I see him as a major figure in showcasing this particular musical unification. Known about and seen this soundtrack for years. Finally decided to pick it up inexpensively on a reprinted,very high quality vinyl because...it just seemed like the right format sonically to enjoy what this particular album had to offer. Even though this is my second attempt at reviewing this? That little bit of time has added greatly to my original perspective.

"Coffee Is The Color" begins the album with a percussion and wah wah based uptempo groove with the vibes providing that jazzy melody. "Pricilla's Theme" starts out in a flute led bossa nova before going back to that same faster rhythm while "King George" is thick,Rhodes piano led hard funk that gurgles and churns. This extends itself throughout the album in different ways such as on the heavily melodic,stripped down "Brawling Broads" and the bluesy guitar drenched "Exotic Dance" as well as "King's Last Ride" with it's rocking wah wah. "Coffee Sauna","Shinning Symbol" and "Making Love" are all beautifully atmospheric ballads. That along with the beautifully arranged "Coffey Baby",featuring a talented young singer named Dee Dee Bridgewater.

"Aragon" and "Escape" return to the same uptempo,percussive flavor of the opener with the looser,more avante gard "End Of Sugarman" closes the album.
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By A Customer on July 2, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I'm big Roy Ayers fan and own many of his recordings on vinyl, including a terribly scratched up version of Coffy, so I was thrilled to be able to find this import CD. Kind of spendy, but worth it. BTW: The movie's great too.
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Format: Audio CD
This is my favorite Pam Grier movie! I got this soundtrack a couple of years ago from Amazon. It's a wonderful soundtrack that is full of variety. If you loved "Coffy" the movie, then your will love the soundtrack. Nothing id left out. (even the creepy harpsicord music) The key tracks are the COFFY is the COLOR, Coffy Baby and King George (he's a pimp. He's a pusher). What a great find!
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When it comes to blaxploitation movie soundtracks, the revolutionary acid-jazz of vibraphonist Roy Ayers often gets lost in the shuffle with "Shaft" (Isaac Hayes), "Superfly" (Curtis Mayfield) and "Black Caesar" (James Brown)....but his 14 tracks are as good as it gets.

The smooth grooves are paced by percussionist William King and drummer Dennis Davis, with the brass handled by a superfecta that includes Jon Faddis and Cecil V. Bridgewater. Four cuts have vocals - "Coffy Is The Color" (Denise Bridgewater, Wayne Garfield, Ayers), "King George" (Ayers), "Coffy Baby" (Bridgewater), "Shining Symbol" (Garfield) - with the former being the standout cut. There is a sweet flow from "Coffy Is The Color," "Priscilla's Theme" and "King George," with a winning exacta in the final tunes, "Vittroni's Theme - King Is Dead" and "End Of Sugarman."

A mini-movie poster is also enclosed, with actress Pam Grier prominently featured. Released in 1973, the music retains its vibrancy through the riffs that a listener cannot resist.
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Format: Audio CD
During the course of the 1970's, a lot of music artists were single handedly holding down music for the entirety of a soundtrack. This seems like taboo now because todays soundtracks feature numerous guests. This usually turns out to be detrimental because with so many guests, soundtracks can sound disjointed and sometimes miss the mark in capturing the feeling of the movie. If you were to view any of the flicks from the 1970's, you would hear artists sticking to the script and giving people nostalgia as if the artist and movie were interconnected. While Roy Ayers does have help from wide-ranging sources in completing this project you can tell that he is running the show. Roy Ayers is one of the most versatile artists I've heard. His ability to adapt to changing eras in music while staying relevant is second to none. He has shifted phases from pure jazz to soul to R & B to Funk and more. He truly is a renaissance man of sorts. He also has a sensual singing voice but on the majority of the "Coffy" soundtrack he lets his music do the talking. I do wish he laid down more vocals, however; the soundtrack is regarded as some of his best vibe work and serves as a strong complement to the movie.
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