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Collective Soul Import

4.5 out of 5 stars 93 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Import, August 25, 2009
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Editorial Reviews

Seven #1 Rock Hits, 4 Platinum Plus albums and 10 million total albums sold, Collective Soul return with their most ambitious album to date, Collective Soul. Recorded in just 45 days in their home studio in Georgia and produced by Ed Roland himself, the album features their most mainstream songs ever recorded. Songs from their last studio album Afterwords were featured in American Idol commercials, The Hills, Woman s Murder Club, Shark, Celebrity Apprentice, Brothers and Sisters, 90210 and more. Most recently Tremble For My Beloved from their album Dosage appears on the Twilight soundtrack.
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Dig
Dig
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You
You
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 25, 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Roadrunner Records/Loud & Proud Records
  • ASIN: B001W9SXSE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (93 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #59,372 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: MP3 Music
In 1994, a song called Shine could be heard on just about every single radio at least once a day. The band that produced this flawless song was completely unknown at the time and could have been one of the all time great one hit wonders. This band was called Collective Soul, and just a year after Shine came out and blew everyone away, they released their second studio album, called Collective Soul. It was this album that started Collective Soul on a path to greatness. With three number one hits and an album that had not one bad song on it, it appeared that this once unnoticed band from Georgia was going to be the biggest act of the nineties. Fate, it seems, had other plans for this HUGELY underrated band. Their greedy manager had retained rights to their albums and the band was receiving very little money from everything they had accomplished. This forced them into a legal battle with their manager right as they were touring. Because of that, they had to cancel some of their tour dates, dates which would have created more album sales and surely more fans. Thanks to their manager, they ran out of money completely and could not record in a normal studio. So, determined to keep going, they retreated into a cabin in Georgia and came back with the release known as Disciplined Breakdown, an album inspired by their breakup with their manager. Although sales and popularity were down from the previous album, Disciplined Breakdown still managed to sell a million copies and was just as consistent as the previous release. It also produced two number one hits, Precious Declaration and Listen. Now that they had made a successful return to fame, the band decided to change their production a little. In 1999, they released Dosage, a much more polished release but still very much a rock album.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
Okay, I'm going to get on my soapbox for one second and demand that people take a close look at perhaps the most underrated band of the past fifteen years. This latest effort comes just over fifteen years after their debut album tore up the airwaves with the smash hit "Shine." In the years that have passed since then, there have been hits (7 number one hits on the US modern rock chart including 1995's "December" and 1999's "Heavy") and not too many misses. Frontman Ed Roland has endured record label conflicts, changes within the band lineup, and a music scene that has all but abandoned alternative rock radio. But with this album, plus the recent return of Third Eye Blind, Sister Hazel, and Better Than Ezra, it might not be ignored for much longer.

The opening track, "Welcome All Again," might just be the band's best melodic hard rock track since "Shine." On "Fuzzy" the band channels their inner David Bowie (yet still manages to sound like Collective Soul). The top 20 leadoff single "Staring Down" is one of the more pop-oriented songs the band has released. But what sets "Rabbit" apart from the recent albums is it's stubborn consistency; there is not a bad track on here. The rockers are short and fast with a singalong melody (like "Dig" for example) and the ballads don't clutter and slow down the record. Even Roland's lyrics have improved, and what's more, he has allowed other band members to write a few of the songs. The end result is a band that sounds as fresh and immediate as many of the newer bands out there today. The difference is that Roland can still write catchy tunes with the best of them. For the Georgia band who always was the little engine that could, the title "Rabbit" is ever so appropriate. Collective Soul just keeps going....and going.....and going......
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have been a fan of this band for over 11 years and have all their albums. I'll be honest and say I was not very impressed by CS's last couple albums. They all had songs on them that I liked but, overall, I skipped over most of the tracks on each one. The songs weren't necessarily bad, as Ed Roland definitely has a gift for crafting a catchy tune, but they just seemed to lack energy and focus, a lot of the songs felt kind of lifeless. That's why I liked "Hollywood" on Afterwords, it may have been a bit fluffy but it was one of the few songs on that cd that I felt had a lot of energy, with a sort "It's Magic" era Cars vibe to it.

THIS album is a definite return to form. It's fun, it's upbeat and most importantly, it rocks. There are a couple ballads but even those have focus and life to them(Ed's song about his and brother Dean Roland's late father is beautiful). I have no trouble listening to every track on this one, though I think the first 3 songs and Understanding are my favorites. "Welcome All Again" is a perfect album opener, great guitar licks. "Fuzzy" is incredibly catchy, with fun lyrics and just great energy over all, though it may be one of those songs that you either love or hate, or maybe both--because it is infectious and the whistle gets stuck in your head. "Dig" just rocks out. "Understanding" just has a really interesting format, with the verse and chorus having very different tempos and once again, a lot of energy, good lyrics and very catchy.

I don't know what was going on when the album was being recorded but it just sounds Ed, Dean, Will, Joel and Cheney(who I think is new on this album?) were having a great time while making this recording. Speaking of Cheney, I don't want to knock the previous drummer Ryan but I feel Cheney's drumming sounds more powerful and that may be part of why this album seems to have more "oomph".
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