Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Usually ships within 7 to 11 days.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Come Feel Me Tremble has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Jason & Mallori
Condition: Used: Very Good
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$9.99
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: US SELLER: HEAR AND SEE MEDIA
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Come Feel Me Tremble

4.3 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, April 7, 2005
"Please retry"
$7.99
$4.48 $0.01

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Get Started with Amazon Prime Stream millions of songs anytime, anywhere, included with an Amazon Prime membership. Get started
$7.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details Usually ships within 7 to 11 days. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Come Feel Me Tremble
  • +
  • Stereo
Total price: $36.50
Buy the selected items together

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Dirty Diesel
  2. Making Me Go
  3. Hillbilly Junk
  4. Soldier Of Misfortune
  5. My Daydream
  6. What A Day (For A Night)
  7. Wild & Lethal
  8. Crackle And Drag (Original take)
  9. Crackle And Drag (Alt Version)
  10. Never Felt Like This Before
  11. Knockin' Em Back
  12. Pine Box
  13. Meet Me Down The Alley
  14. These Days


Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 7, 2005)
  • Original Release Date: 2003
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Vagrant
  • ASIN: B0000D1D5H
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #126,638 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Paul Westerberg Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jeffrey J. Sulski on November 13, 2003
Format: Audio CD
After listening to other reviewers say that "Come Feel Me Tremble" is probably the more polished of Paul Westerberg's two new releases, I'm really wondering what "Dead Man Shake" might sound like. Westerberg, who lately seems like he's never met a "Take-one" that he didn't like, presents "Tremble" in extreme lo-fi mode, allowing some missed-note vocals and buried mixes to often take forefront. Production wise, it's a step down from "Stereo" and even "Mono" for that matter. Even the CD label bears witness to this approach, as the song listings are out of order, and the art work slightly pixilated. The Replacements always walked along that razor blade edge between unchained rawness and structured lyricism. On "Tremble", there's a not-so-subtle reminder of this with the two versions of Crackle & Drag, one raucous, one delicate, running back-to-back.
Yet Westerberg on a bad-production day is better than most artists at their commercially slickest. The sincerity of his guitar riffs shines through; his clever lyrics keep your ear to the speaker in order to hear the words through the fuzz. He's always one to come up with great play-on-words song titles (Soldier of Misfortune, What A Day For A Night). Although he throws off the material like it doesn't matter, it's apparent his heart is in his work. In their minds, some fans are probably still hoping that buried in Westerberg is an album that combines the energy of the Replacements with with the maturity of a 40-something skilled artist. "Come Feel Me Tremble" is not that album, but it is a good portrait of a man who's still a rebel without a clue but with a lot to say. Airplay will probably elude him, but in today's over-hyped and over-commercialized music scene, Westerberg's continues to be the real thing.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I'm another one of these 'Mats/Paul fans who has been a little disappointed in some of the solo stuff (if only because of my high expectations). As I dutifully ordered both new CDs, I found myself thinking that I would like the Grandpaboy CD a lot better, since I enjoyed Mono a lot more than Stereo last time around. I'm happy to say that I was pleasantly surprised by Come Feel Me Tremble (not a rip on Dead Man Shake - also worth having). After about a week in my CD player, my early impression is that it's my favorite Paul solo effort so far. Just one long-time fan's opinion.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
It's impressive that this and the Grandpaboy album Dead Man Shake (which is also Paul Westerberg) have come out on the same day. For people that believe Paul is a fine songwriter, that's really good news. Still, it seems his love of the "first take" has led to more than a few half-cooked songs over the past couple of years. I guess it's understandable when you remember how overproduced and over-labored upon records like Dont Tell A Soul and Suicaine Gratification were. Those songs often seemed to have the air sucked out of them, and probably suffered frm over-production, and way too many takes and overdubs...
Now, left to his own devices and two indie labels - Fat Possum & Vaugrant - Paul seems to be making records by himself and in his basement, which leads to a homey sloppiness. I dont mind that. The looseness of the Replacements and of some of their contemporaries (Husker Du, Soul Asylum) and their influences (Faces, Stones) was one of their strongest attributes.
There are some wonderful songs here - but the tone seems of Come Feel Me Tremble feels too close to the Mono/Stereo albums to me. Dead Man Shake by Paul's alterego Grandpaboy seems different enough to make it much more interesting to me. Perhaps having the framework of making a semi-blues album for a semi-blues record label gave him enough structure to put that record on top. And much as I love the Jackson Browne song "These Days" on CFMT, the covers by Hank Williams and john Prine on Dead Man Shake are, again, better.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought the disc and carried it for a week before I popped it in. I was afraid, I guess. "Stereo" was one of the most depressed albums ever, and I just wasn't prepared to carry it. Love Paul, love the 'Mats, but I need some good times mixed in with my mid-life angst, you know?
Sure am glad I got over my wimpiness, because "Come Feel Me Tremble" was just what I needed. A kickass, basement recording that feels like a live club gig (remarkable, when you consider that Paul probably played everything himself), "Tremble" delivers everything we want from Paul - intelligent lyrics, killer hooks, wordplay, strangled vocals - only he lets his anger and joy spill out onto every track. Each cut is killer, rockin, sloppy as hell, and pure rock and roll.
Speaking of strangled vocals - Paul's voice isn't getting any better, exactly, but it's an amazingly expressive instrument. Oddly enough, he seems to be channeling Frank Black at times, which is only fair, since Black is a disciple. Hearing him struggle for the harmonies and high notes is painful sometimes, but then again, Paul's all about sharing his pain with his audience. Check out "Tremble" and feel a real man's pain.
1 Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: vinyl pop