Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Complete Mission: Impossible Dossier Paperback – 1991

4.8 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$47.16 $4.07

Featured theatre & performance books
Explore featured titles on theatre and performance.
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 456 pages
  • Publisher: Avon Books (P); Reissue edition (1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380758776
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380758777
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 7.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #734,175 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In my humble opinion, Mission: Impossible is the most imaginative television series of all time. This book is the perfect companion, giving

much information on the gestation of the series, the creator, Bruce Geller, the actors, directors, writers, producers and a list of every episode made, including the 1980's revival of the series. What is not apparent to the viewer but comes out in this history of the series, is that the series underwent a number of major crises, any one of which could have finished it off, yet it survived to last for seven seasons, while generally maintaining its quality. For example, not many know that creator Geller actually only wrote one episode, the pilot (the story of the nuclear bombs stored in the vault of a hotel in a Latin American country). Although he rode herd on the show for several seasons, he was finally forcibly ejected from the studio. Original star of the series, Steven Hill was forced to leave the show due to matters of concience.

During season three, when the finest episodes of the series were being

produced, the top writers got into a fiery dispute with Geller and quit in the middle of the season leaving no scripts ready to be filmed. Fortunately, Paul Playdon, possibly the best writer of all to work on the series was recruited at this crucial moment and saved the show. At the end of this same third season, stars Martin Landau and Barbara Bain both quit the show. In spite of all this, the show survived and more or less maintained its quality.

One of the best things in the book is that it lists the stuntmen-doubles who appeared in the show. In the first-season episode called "The Confession", there is one of the most amazing stunts I have ever seen on television....
Read more ›
1 Comment 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on February 9, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is outstanding! I like it so much, I would go on to own 4 copies. If you like entertainment, or research, this is the book for you. It's full of pictures, information, and synopsises. There is so much the author has chosen to share, it is almost 500 pages. You will enjoy reading it. If you want to look up how many episodes Lee Meriwether guest-starred in during season four, or find out why Martin Landau and Barbara Bain really left the show, having this book is a must. I often use it to look up episodes from a particular season. The only thing missing is a list of memorabilia from the show, such as comic books, TV Guides, and paperbacks. However, that is a very minor oversight, which takes nothing away from the content itself.

In short, it is a classy, intelligent book, for a classy, intelligent show. Every good TV show should have a book like this.
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Once, according to author Patrick J. White, a pair of writers were talking to a producer who wanted a script for the hit CBS series "Mission: Impossible." It was literally that, they said, an impossible assignment.

"We don't understand the show," one writer complained.

"Good, you're the perfect people to write it!" the producer replied.

Amazingly this went on for seven years and produced hours of television in the late 1960s and early 1970s still remembered today. White's "The Complete Mission: Impossible Dossier" is a terrific reference book for "Mission: Impossible" fans and a nice read for everyone else. Many of the episodes may have been sweat-free affairs of undoing evildoers through intricate plans and misdirection plays, but behind the scenes nothing came easy.

There was the concept itself, which required lazy TV watchers to regulate bathroom breaks and beer runs or risk missing a key story element. There were the characters, who while mostly recurring roles gave you very little to go on. Finally, there was the many battles, over costs between CBS and Paramount, over control between producer-creator Bruce Geller and his writers and associates, and over salaries for the many stars who came and left.

White captures all this very well, offering solid examinations of each season and quick if comprehensive breakdowns of each show. The 1991 edition I own may no longer be complete; several hit movies based on the franchise have since been made; but any author who goes to the trouble of getting interviews from Arthur Ashe and Robert Altman in order to flesh out their tangential parts in the "Mission: Impossible" story is striving for thoroughness.
Read more ›
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book is a perfect companion for any MI fan. Includes plot details and breakdowns and actor bio's and series reviews. Everything is here. Definetly worth buying and now all i want is for Paramount to release series on DVD. Life would be perfect then.
1 Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Complete Mission: Impossible Dossier is quite an excursion through the M.I. series. Author Patrick J. White starts with an introduction to Bruce Geller, creator of the series, following through with segments on; writing the show, to making the pilot, to directing the episodes, to the props and special effects, to the extensive makeups, and ultimately to the editing, sound and music. The coverage of the background of the show is wide-ranging, very often with quotes from actors, and/or writers, producers, directors, etc.

The book begins each season with a segment on any changes made for that season such as cast changes, again with many quotes from the cast, writers and producers. With so many episodes making up the run of the series, you can imagine that most of the pages are devoted to the episode synopses.
Then comes the episode guide for the 168 episodes. Most every synopsis covers a page, to up to a page-and-a-half. Every episode outline includes the text of the recording that the IMF leader hears at the beginning of each show delineating the "impossible mission" he's being offered. Then comes the lengthy plot summary, followed by a list of the guest cast including the names of the characters they portray. Finally the synopsis ends with supplemental information on the making of the episode. These are the most comprehensive synopses I've ever seen for a TV show, but then the stories were quite complicated.
A fun addition, which is not mentioned on the contents page, is included in the last few pages which reprint the MAD Magazine parody of Mission Impossible, "Mission Ridiculous."
With a generous sprinkling of photos throughout the book, this is a very welcome addition to the library of any Mission Impossible fan.

Morris D. Sullivan
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews