Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Complex Justice: The Case of Missouri v. Jenkins

4.4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0807831397
ISBN-10: 0807831395
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$5.74
In Stock. Sold by BookHouseUSA
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: SERVING OUR CUSTOMERS WITH BEST PRICES. Please compare our Prices & Feedback.Reliable customer service!! Hassle free return policy, satisfaction guranteed**** Remainder mark
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
30 Used from $5.74
+ $3.99 shipping
More Buying Choices
21 New from $5.74 30 Used from $5.74
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Get a FREE Amazon Echo with homework help
Choose from 40+ subjects with online tutors from The Princeton Review. Learn more
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

A meticulous, well-documented political history of school desegregation in the Kansas City Missouri School District. . . . I applaud him for the richness of detail in the history and politics of this tragic folly and his courage in characterizing the events and individuals. He does not pull any punches.--Political Science Quarterly



Deeply researched, well informed, and clearly written. . . . A premier case study of race and education in the 1980s and 1990s.--The Journal of Southern History

About the Author

Joshua M. Dunn is assistant professor of political science at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press (April 14, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807831395
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807831397
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #307,875 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
No single rating could suffice for this book. It covers two quite different topics--(1) the rough and tumble of education policy and politics, and its financing, as played out in a city where, not long ago the Pendergast machine was In Charge; and (2) teh dream that the federal courts and agencies could remake the system to root out what remained of discrimination by forcing a dysfunctional school board, with a virtually unlimited budget, to create a new .system of such excellence that it would lure white students back from the suburban districts to which they had fled o escape the schools. It is not surprising that this quixotic effort failed. What is astonishing is that a number of intelligent people thought it had a chance of success.

My own interest in the book was as an attorney who feels strongly that our courts should not be making policy--that's the job of our elected officials. This book is red meat for anyone with that philosophy. But at almost 200 pages of text, and a number of footnotes I admit having not read, I found it quite a bit too long. I would have been satisfied with a "think piece" in one of the few remaining magazines which offer such material--perhaps The Atlantic. Having said which, if one is looking for an encyclopedic report on what can go wrong when well-meaning people try to implement bad plans, it's all here. But I would think anyone interested in the issues would already be well aware of how petty the bickering of frustrated folk convinced of their own rectitude can be.

My only other criticism is that even as an attorney quite familiar with articles laden with case references I had difficulty with his handling of the cases that lay behind the difficulties with which the District Court and Eighth Circuit were struggling.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am finding this book fascinating. The subject matter is complex, but the author has taken the time to synthesize the material so a layperson can understand deeply and meaningfully. I recommend that all education leaders and political leaders take the time to read Complex Justice. To paraphrase a great quote--if we do not know our history, we are destined to repeat it--over and over again to the detriment of our young people.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As the author stated this is a mostly forgotten case. I only remember because I lived in Kansas City at the time. However I never attended the Kansas City school District. I remember vividly the number of times tax increases were put to a vote of people and it failed every single time. So supporters of increased taxation used this farce of a desegregation case to steal more money from the people and got a federal judge to sign off on it. However as the author shows this case was never about desegregation or about improving the education for local children it was about corrupt politicians stealing more money from the local citizens.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
<Complex Justice> is about a relatively recent but little remembered (unless you happen to have been a Kansas City, MO or Missouri taxpayer) case in which a federal judge took control of a large city's school system to bring black students' test scores up to the level of white students'. Though he (1) ordered Kansas City, MO taxes to be raised, (2) diverted Missouri state taxes to the Kansas City (MO) School District, and (3), caused around two BILLION dollars to be spent to "upgrade" the school system which served mostly black students, the results were zero. It was a waste of 2 BILLION dollars by a federal court which thought it had all of the answers about how to raise black test scores -- and which didn't mind going through 2 BILLION dollars of taxpayers' money like a drunk at the racetrack in the losing gamble on an impossible result..

If the court and its "experts" had read massive psychological data on record at the time, they would have known that test scores depend on IQ which is (1), largely inherited and cannot be raised significantly, and (2), that black IQ in the U.S. is around 15 points (1 standard deviation) lower than white IQ on the bell curve. A good argument can be made that the court and its so-called experts were grossly negligent in taking the actions they took.

Joshua Dunn, author of <Complex Justice> did an excellent job in putting the account of the case, Missouri v. Jenkins, clearly and succinctly into book form easily understood by anyone having the sense to read it. This book is unlikely to be a best seller because it is not the type to attract a wide audience. Never mind.
Read more ›
6 Comments 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
In the late 1980s and early 1990s, a federal judge from a conservative background ordered some unusual remedies in a Kansas City, Mo. school desegregation case; instead of requiring busing or manipulating school attendance zone boundaries, he sought to improve city schools (and thus bring whites to Kansas City from the suburbs, thus integrating city schools) by ordering tax increases leading to billions of dollars of spending, raising teacher salaries by 44 percent, reducing class sizes so that student-teacher ratios were less than 13-1 (well below the national average), and ordering the creation of gold-plated magnet schools with magnificent physical facilities. The results were dismal: white enrollment continued to decline (ensuring segregated schools) and student test scores did not improve.

What went wrong? Dunn points out that the magnet school format was unlikely to work, because white suburbanites were basically satisfied with their schools, and both whites and blacks were more interested in quality basic education than the exotic curricula of magnet schools.

This book explains why the judge endorsed the policies he did. Judge Clark (the trial court judge presiding over the Kansas City case) was not a left-wing activist; however, he was constrained by Eighth Circuit and Supreme Court precedent that (1) required some sort of aggressive action in urban school districts, even those that had sought to comply in good faith with earlier supreme court decisions but (2) prohibited busing students to or from suburban school districts, thus ensuring that the Kansas City schools would forever continue to be overwhelmingly African-American.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: complex numbers