Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: *WITHDRAWN LIBRARY COPY in VERY GOOD condition* with customary collection markings/stickers. Proceeds benefit our library! FULFILLED BY AMAZON. ELIGIBLE FOR FREE AMAZON PRIME SHIPPING OR FREE SHIPPNG ON AMAZON FULFILLED ORDERS OVER $35.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A Consumers' Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America Hardcover – January 21, 2003

4.2 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
New from Used from
"Please retry"
"Please retry"
$29.99 $4.98

Learn more about the top issues of this year's presidential race with these books sponsored by Wiley.
Election Year.
Learn more about the top issues of this year's presidential race with these books sponsored by Wiley.Learn more.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

After WWII, Americans' lives were shaped by economic, political, social and cultural structures premised on the notion that mass consumption would bring widespread prosperity and social equality. In an ideal America, mass consumption would "provide jobs, purchasing power, and investment dollars, while also allowing Americans to live better than ever before, participate in political decision-making on an equal footing with their similarly prospering neighbors, and to exercise their cherished freedoms by making independent choices in markets and politics." Although the postwar era offered a period of unprecedented affluence and encouraged certain forms of political activism, Bancroft Prize-winning historian Cohen (Making a New Deal) powerfully illustrates the consumer culture's failures in terms of social egalitarianism. The postwar housing shortage spawned suburbs that starkly emphasized class and racial differences; well-intentioned innovations, such as the G I bill, had little impact on women, working-class men and African-Americans; targeted marketing segmented citizens along class, gender, age, race and ethnic lines, accentuating divisions and undermining commonalities; and economic inequality expanded greatly during the past three decades. Cohen's sharp and incisive history particularly highlights the struggles of blacks seeking civil rights and women pursuing greater representation within the republic, illuminating the ways that mass consumption both helped and hindered their progress. Ultimately, Cohen asks whether mass consumption has successfully created a more egalitarian and democratic American society. The answer is balanced, judicious and laced with suggestions for how American citizens can begin to articulate a common vision for the future, even as the nation's population grows ever more diverse. 64 illus., 3 maps.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Without question, this is a difficult, demanding, and dense book--but it is also a greatly significant contribution to this season's business literature. Cohen, author of the prizewinning Making a New Deal (1990), submits a copiously researched, brilliantly conceived, and ultimately quite instructive study of American economics since the Depression. Stated in its simplest terms, her thesis, which she elaborately, even excitingly develops, is that from the 1930s until the present day, particularly since WW II, the U.S. defines what she calls a consumer republic: "an economy, culture, and politics built around the promises of mass consumption." She posits that within the second half of the twentieth century, good consumerism and good citizenship became twin concepts--ideals that were mutually inclusive. The belief arose and gained veracity that to maintain American might, the good citizen must also be the good consumer. The ramifications of this political notion are explored in various aspects of how and where Americans lived over the past half-century, with considerable attention paid to the effect of the consumer republic on black Americans. Not just for business readers but also for those who are serious about history, political science, and sociology. Brad Hooper
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf; 1st edition (January 21, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375407502
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375407505
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1.6 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #919,782 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Important Information

Example Ingredients

Example Directions

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

on February 8, 2003
Format: Hardcover
0Comment| 39 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on March 11, 2003
Format: Hardcover
0Comment| 37 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon February 1, 2004
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
33 comments| 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews