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Controlling The World with Your PC 1st Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1878707154
ISBN-10: 1878707159
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"An important addition to the technical library of any engineer, technician, student, or electronics hobbyist who works with PCs."
--TIES Magazine

"According to his publisher, Paul Bergsman has taught technology and mathematics in the Philadelphia public schools for 21 years. The clarity and thoroughness displayed in this book suggest to me that he's a pretty good teacher. I'm giving his book an A+."
--Electronics Handbook

About the Author

Paul Bergsman has taught electronics for over 20 years and has years of experience interfacing real-world devices with computers. He attended Temple University to study electronics and later received a Bachelor of Arts in secondary education from Temple. He regards this book as a union of the two camps of programmers and "hardware hackers."
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 268 pages
  • Publisher: Newnes; 1 edition (May 15, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1878707159
  • ISBN-13: 978-1878707154
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,521,339 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By R. Bolton on June 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book goes straight in to code, no connections or words about interface. Although he has lots of projects and lots of code, including a disk, unless you know how to use cable connections from board to PC or PC to whatever you are trying to control (he has a motor project) then you will be wasting your time with it. If you are adventurous or know how to connect, then the book is generally pretty good. Has 40 projects which vary quite a bit and the circuit schematics for some projects also. But definitely not for a beginner.
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By A Customer on July 21, 1999
Format: Paperback
If you do want to controll devices with your computer, this book is what you need. Because of this book I learned a new computer language (Pascal). I have built the circuit on page 238, and it works great, and now I can see how my programs work. I highly recommend it.
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Format: Paperback
Controlling the World With Your Pc covers a vast array of interface topics, from stepper motors to alarm systems to Analog interface. The text is clear and straitforward with useful discussion of the circut and the accompanying program. The programs are well documented so only a rudimentary knowledge is necessary to get through the examples, and some programming tecniques can be learned just form the examples. The book gives enough information to facilitate further developement of custom interfaces based on those in the book, or those that are completely origional
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Paul's book was not written for those lacking experience in the areas of both electronics and programming. This book ties those fields together very nicely. I really wish I had a copy of this book earlier in my life as it is truly a goldmine of information. The code in this book is for MS DOS, *NOT* MS Windows. Windows handles the parallel port kinda funny and this code is for direct access (which Windows doesn't like). This means you can't run the code in a DOS window. I've adapted some of Paul's code for use on Linux (minimal rewriting) and for control of many laboratory instruments and data logging gear.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is helped me to understand the basic concepts of circuits controlled by the PC. It was based mostly in the parallel port, but today you can apply this knowledge to Input/Output boards with no problem because the electronic components of the external circuits has not changed much and the PC has all these years.
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Format: Paperback
Paul's book was not written for those lacking experience in the areas of both electronics and programming. This book ties those fields together very nicely. I really wish I had a copy of this book earlier in my life as it is truly a goldmine of information. The code in this book is for MS DOS, *NOT* MS Windows. Windows handles the parallel port kinda funny and this code is for direct access (which Windows doesn't like). This means you can't run the code in a DOS window. I've adapted some of Paul's code for use on Linux (minimal rewriting) and for control of many laboratory instruments and data logging gear.
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Format: Paperback
This book is a little outdated now. It is hard to find a computer with a parallel port or serial port. Still, it is a great learning tool if you have the hardware to support it. I have owned this book for several years and still go back to it as a reference from time to time.
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By A Customer on September 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
has so much usefull info in it, source code on a disk, what more do you need. Lots of handy curcuits.
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