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Corentium Home 223 Radon Detector, Radon Gas Detector, USA version in pCi/L

4.7 out of 5 stars 179 customer reviews
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Price: $199.99 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Specifications for this item
Brand Name Corentium
EAN 7090031102234
Import Designation Imported
Number of Items 1
Part Number 223
Power Source Type battery-powered
UNSPSC Code 41113115

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  • Corentium Home 223 Radon Detector, Radon Gas Detector, USA version in pCi/L
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Total price: $234.34
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Product Features

  • Extremely accurate (±5%)
  • LCD display short term 1 day and 7 days, and long term 1 year average
  • USA version in pCi/L
  • Designed in Europe, and tested in Japan
  • Unaffected by humidity, electromagnetic interference and dust

Product Description

The Corentium radon gas monitor is a state-of-the-art measuring instrument that combines ease of use and performance. The Corentium monitor allows you to take a reading of the radon levels and its LCD screen displays the average daily, weekly and long term concentrations. Powered by 3 standard AAA batteries, the monitor makes it easy to take measurements from one room to another in order to get an overview of the concentrations of radon in a home, workplace, school, a daycare centre or any other location. The Corentium monitor is also an essential tool to use when performing property inspections or when checking the operation of a radon mitigation system. The internal architecture of the Corentium monitor comes from advanced technology normally reserved for commercial-type detectors. Particular attention has been paid to the quality and protection of the internal components, allowing the use of algorithms for signal analysis that are more sophisticated. The Corentium monitor quickly adapts to its environment and eliminates inaccuracies related to external factors, allowing it to obtain the best accuracy in its niche. The Corentium monitor is guaranteed for one year and in normal home use, it requires no annual calibrations throughout its useful life, estimated at over 10 years.

Troubleshooting steps : When the unit is powered on, it perform a self-calibration and self-test during few minutes.During this period, the Reset and Mode button are deactivated.  Then, the self-calibration and self-test re-happen each 24h (and during these few minutes, the reset and mode button are again deactivated).

Product Details

Manual [PDF]
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B00H2VOSP8
  • Item model number: 223
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (179 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #363 in Industrial & Scientific (See Top 100 in Industrial & Scientific)
  • Manufacturer’s warranty can be requested from customer service. Click here to make a request to customer service.

From the Manufacturer


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Verified Purchase
[Edit: 3/5/15]
Sorry to the folks who were waiting to see the results of my side by side comparisons between this device, the Safety Siren, and the charcoal mail in tests. I've attached a photo of both detectors (along with the charcoal test, only did one of those) side by side after both had been sitting there for over a week. As you can see, the Safety Siren is set to short term reading, which I believe is the past 7 days reading, and shows at 1.6 while the Corentium shows 1.64 and is for the past 7 days also. So, based on this test (and I've done this several other times with the same, comparable results) both detectors seem to give similar readings.

Of course, the gold standard seems to still be the charcoal, mail in kits and so I've attached a photo of that reading too. Basically, the kit shown in the pick was set out for the required time (48 hours) and mailed in promptly. The reading I got back from the company was 1.7 pCi/L, so pretty close to both detectors. The Safety Siren only goes to one decimal place and so is a bit more limited than the Corentium which goes out to 2 decimal places, but in reality 2 decimal places is probably not very valuable or helpful.

So, to summarize, my test did show that the device is pretty accurate compared to a charcoal test and also that the Safety Siren was comparable -- although that device does not run on batteries and apparently needs to be recalibrated on an annual basis or so. The Corentium supposedly does not ever need to be recalibrated which just seems really odd to me. I will repeat these tests periodically and update this review on an annual basis (or until a better detector comes out than either of these!) to see how well the Corentium stands up over the years with regards to calibration need.
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Since I work long hours in a basement level of my home, and the area where I live is known for radon issues, I've spent plenty of time and effort over the years tracking the radon levels and doing my own mitigation. The technology used in the Corentium monitor appealed to me as an engineer, so I purchased a half dozen of them from Corentium's site (which offers quantity discounts) as a group buy for myself and my neighbors. So far, we are very pleased with them. The build quality is decent, and the units seem to work as advertised, matching the readings from short-term charcoal tests within about 0.3 pCi/L once the readings stabilize (takes 3-4 weeks to really settle in). Seeing the effects of changing the ventilation in my home over a couple of days has been pretty cool. The only oddity I've found is that the enclosure includes one of those oblong holes in the plastic for wall mounting, yet the enclosed instructions advise letting the unit sit flat on a table, away from walls and air vents. This approach to radon measurement is rather new, but Corentium's response to my questions has been quick and friendly, so I'm confident that they would help resolve any issues that arise. With states like Minnesota now mandating the inclusion of radon measurement and mitigation information in real estate disclosure forms, I think this little monitor will be an especially useful tool to own.
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I own a few different Radon Gas Monitors / Detectors and must say that this model clearly stands out well ahead of the rest and it basically boils down to its simplicity. Insert the batteries, press the reset button in the inside of the battery compartment and you are literally done. There are no external buttons on this unit; you don't need them. Everything you need to know is clearly displayed on the monitor. It's sleek, compact and has a nice look to it. If this model didn't cost so much, I would literally buy a few more of them for a project I'd like to do. Way to go Corentium.
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This device works great and is giving the correct reading which matched the charcoal canister reading. Ok people so until we get the Radon fan in do we keep the windows open or not? I read open windows is a bad thing because it sucks up more gas from the ground but it’s the only way to air out the house so it doesn't build up. I tested without windows and doors open and with open doors and windows, the readings go to normal when everything is open but what about all the build up from decay gas that settles... do we vacuum to get rid of the so called sticky Radon Daughters on the dust? according to the internet the break down of the gas called Radon Daughters is what causes the cancer in the lungs. How do we get rid of the Radon Daughters on the dust without making things worse in the air? Should we get air filters? So many questions and no answers how to clean up ... the Radon mitigation industry or investigations can't give us these answers on how to clean up radon daughters ourselves, we asked and they say “we don’t know we are just the installers” or "we don’t know we just test for it". I feel so helpless at this point. Some people say the whole Radon thing is a racket and BS and that the studies are inconclusive and some take it very seriously. Well it’s better to play it safe but how do we clean it up?

My story...I’m freaked out!! We are selling our home and have been here 18 years. During inspection we were told our Radon in our basement is 37.4 pCi/L high. I am reading on the internet 50% of that is on the 1st floor and 50% of that is on the 2nd floor which is way too high on all floors. Sure enough this Corentium meter confirms it.
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