Industrial Deals Beauty Summer Reading STEM nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc Starting at $39.99 Wickedly Prime Handmade Wedding Rustic Decor Shop Popular Services gotpremiere gotpremiere gotpremiere  Introducing Echo Show All-New Fire 7, starting at $49.99 Kindle Oasis Nintendo Switch Water Sports toystl17_gno



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Showing 1-10 of 13 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 16 reviews
on November 30, 2014
Needed this textbook for course towards my undergrad degree. Upon reading it initially, is a bit overwhelming and written as if the reader is a professional with a background in business and not for an undergrad student being introduced to concepts within corporate structure. Also depicts who's been naughty and who's been nice in the corporate world which I found very interesting. The author is redundant is some areas but that turned out to be a good thing since you get a re-emphasis on concepts you may not have grasped in a previous chapter. Each chapter is about 120 pages at minimum. The final chapter discusses international corporate governance which was utterly boring.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on October 10, 2016
The book's content is as expected but certain pages have blurred, double type face and make it difficult to read.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on September 2, 2016
I like it
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on May 23, 2013
This is one of the best business books I have read. However, I had to contact the actual publisher for a missing section of the book which was sent to me in a pdf format. The materials included were very relevant and timely.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on September 18, 2014
As an educational book -- it's one of the only texts books on the subject of corporate governance -- this book is WAY to opinionated. You can be educational without shoving your opinions down the readers throat. The authors clearly express their opinion that ALL corporations are evil. Yes, fraud and many other crimes are a problem in corporate america, but america is also home to murders, thieves, etc....Of course fraud is bound to take place in corporations, many humans are greedy but Monk and Minow would say all humans (at least in corporations) are greedy. There are bad cops out there but are all cops bad people? Every one of them? No, that's a ridiculous conclusion to make of a few. Just like you can't assume that because some corporations commit fraud that they are all inherently evil.

Aside from the complete bias of the authors, the book is also very scattered minded. Chapter 1 is 90 pages that could have easily been summed up to about 15-20 pages but, of course, they needed an additional 65-70 pages to defend their views of corporate america. It's like they had a general outline of what they wanted to write about, and as they were writing they kept adding anything that popped into their head.

Final point, some of their information just seems inaccurate or misleading. Anyone in accounting knows what is meant by "keeping two books". It's two different ways to do your accounting and both books serve a purpose. You may be in a business where LIFO inventory is appropriate for the product you carry, however, FIFO inventory method may be more appropriate for how you do your taxes. It's not a method to "deliberately disguise and confuse investors" as if they are trying to get away with something. Investors know how to look at two different books and as long as that is a legal form of accounting I don't understand what is so wrong with it. At the very least, the authors could have gave a basic description of what keeping two books means. Another example that bothered me was their opinion about how BP carelessly damaged the environment in the oil spill. They failed, however, to mention that BP paid 40 billion in fines, and donated 11 billion to companies affected by the spill.

Overall, just not a very good book IF used for educational purposes. If you just want to read a book about reasons why to dislike corporate america, you would love this book.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on February 5, 2010
This book isn't a hard read. The concepts aren't difficult to capture. There are a lot of case studies and stories used to drive the point but this book is just filled with words, and LOTS of them. It's also a book that is hard to study off of because there aren't any key concepts that are underlined, or bolded or italisized. There are no graphs, no charts, no pictures. There aren't even page breaks for chapters. There is no skimming this book when you want to review because you don't know where everything is. You just have to re-read it, then re-read it again.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on April 23, 2001
Would be an excellent tome for students of business. Also would be applicable for folks who are more interested in the corporate governance from a policy side. It's focus is publicly held companies, so if you're looking for a practitioners guide on how to 'get things done' in a startup world, this book doesn't address any of that. That doesn't make it a bad book, it just has it's focus on public companies.
0Comment| 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on April 21, 2013
Unless you have to buy this for a very important class, you're best off borrowing it. I have, of course, only read excerpts, but rambling incoherent groupings of words is a more apt description. The Cases in Point make no sense, at all.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on March 14, 2015
Excellent
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on February 1, 2015
I ordered the book for a college class. Excellent book, very informative.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse