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Cortlandt

3.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Audio CD, November 6, 2007
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Editorial Reviews

Sean MALONE Cortlandt CD

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Controversy
  2. Splinter
  3. Fischer's Gambit
  4. Hand Full of Earth
  5. Sinfonia
  6. Giant Steps
  7. At Taliesin
  8. Big Sky Wanting
  9. The Big Idea
  10. Unquity Road [*]


Product Details

  • Audio CD (November 6, 2007)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Free Electric Sound
  • ASIN: B000W4D966
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #524,236 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Kamil on August 8, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Cortlandt is the only solo recording by bassist Sean Malone. According to his words this album consist "a lot of the bits and pieces that never made it to the setlists of the groups he played in". The line-up is pretty amazing: Sean Reinert on drums, Trey Gunn on Warr guitar, Reeves Gabrels on Guitar. Musically it's much more closer to jazz than other projects Malone's been involved to. Still there's very much variety.

The opening track "Controversy" is a typical jazz piece, it's 16th note bass intro will amaze you. "Splinter" starts with some heavy distorted guitars but after couple of seconds it leads to a fusion exploration. "Fisher's Gambit" seven years later found it's place on Gordian Knot's second recording. Here's the first version, more eternal sounding thanks Trey Gunn's warm soundscapes. Coltrane's "Giant Steps" is completely rearranged, some of sax parts are played here by Malone on his fretless. In the second part there appears an eastern sound influence. This part was later used in "Redemption's Way" on first GK release. It's a wonderful cover that will not leave your head for months. The eastern influence also appears on other tracks. "Hand Full of Earth" starts with this kind of flavor, just to end with a wonderfully gorgeous soundscapes.

Cortlandt has some flows ( cheesy sounding keyboards), but the overall impression is very good. The music has a warm tone and is less aggressive and more spacey than Malone's work in Gordian Knot. Tracking down a copy may not be easy. However if you enjoy Sean's other works, good fusion or want to hear fantastic bass playing, be sure not to miss this one.
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Format: Audio CD
I was expecting another Levin/Gunn clone.(Gunn guests on one track) Malone has his own sound and feel. This CD has a more Jazz/Fusion vibe than the Gordian Knot discs. Sean Reinert's percussive nuances are complimentary to Malone smooth bass lines and don't get in the way of the melodies. Malone uses his stick, at times, to offer keyboard like accents. Reeves Gabrels (Bowie/Tin Machine) makes some noise on the cd's best track, "At Taliesin." I thought it was Trey Gunn on the first listen. The only shortcoming on this disc is it's brevity, 41 minutes, with 30 something minutes of silence before a short 24 second teaser on the ninth "bonus" track.
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Format: Audio CD
Sean Malone is a genius. There is no question of that. If there is a bass player, or stick player for that matter, who feels comfortable in their abilities, listen to this album. It will make you humble is a hurry. Keep an eye on Sean.
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By A Customer on September 26, 2003
Format: Audio CD
My .02:
Having heard this CD, and subsequently borrowing it from a fellow bass player recently, the sad fact is that Sean Malone is trying to fill the shoes of Jaco Pastorius. The problem is that Malone's phrasing is hollow and cold, precise but emotionless, and yet you can still hear Jaco in there. No new fretless ground is broken on any of the tracks. It seems Malone has written a trancription book of Jaco's solos recently which might explain the obvious nod to the late, great bassist on Malone's CD. The only thing wrong with that is the multitudes of Jaco-clones already in the industry (Mark Egan, etc.). You can hear Jaco's influence in many different genres, so why would you buy this CD when you could purchase a classic Weather Report or Jaco solo album and hear the original. Either way, if you're looking for innovative fretless bass playing, pick up a CD w/Percy Jones or Mick Karn, and leave 'Cortlandt' alone.
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