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Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Good readable copy. Worn edges and covers and may have small creases. The cover may have wear and if there is a dustjacket, it may have normal wear. There may be light writing or highlighting. All pages are present and item is in good condition. This is an ex library book, stickers and markings accordingly.
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The Counterfeit Family Tree of Vee Crawford-Wong Hardcover – July 23, 2013

4.8 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 9 Up-High school sophomore Vee Crawford-Wong is smart, witty, insecure, occasionally brash, and living with parents who refuse to talk about their pasts. When his history teacher assigns an essay on family history, the teen invents grandparents and experiences to explain his half-Chinese, half-Texan identity. Angry at his parents' silence on this issue, Vee, with the help of his Asian friend, Madison, forges a letter from Vee's imagined Chinese grandparents inviting their son and his family to visit China. When the trip becomes a reality and his dying grandfather is actually located, Vee at last begins to understand his father and himself. This engaging narrative is brimming with what-I-am-thinking vs. what-I-just-did quandaries about girls, sex, athletics, bullies, teachers, coaches, and family relationships. Vee's crush on volatile hottie Adele temporarily blinds him to the loyalty and support of Madison and the integrity of his teacher. His joking demeanor belies his (and possibly readers') understandable frustration with his parents' lack of communication. Ultimately, his mother's and father's family histories and tensions are partially revealed. Although rambling in spots, Vee's story is upbeat, entertaining, and humorous. His personal dilemmas and explicit descriptions and language capture the adolescent male psyche; offer a mixed-ethnicity perspective; portray the social crosscurrents of public high school; and highlight the values of family, forgiveness, and self-respect.-Gerry Larson, formerly at Durham School of the Arts, NCα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

Vee longs to know more about his mysterious family. Why does Dad never talk about China? Mom hails from Texas but never mentions her family. And that’s only one of the wisecracking California teen’s issues. He longs to be on gorgeous Adele’s radar, make the basketball team, and be less disappointed in the whole business of high school. When JV basketball does not pan out and Vee becomes the girls’ team manager, his social life opens up—but so does a new level of angst. Aided by a friend, Vee forges a letter from China asking the Crawford-Wongs to visit and reconnect with their roots. Will Dad buy it? Suffice it to say, the China trip is the best part of the story, full of suspense regarding who they’ll meet and benefiting from the well-drawn relationship between Vee and his father. The R-rated high-school element includes some stereotyping, and Vee’s intense self-reflection gets a bit overdone. Still, the bittersweet conclusion saves the day and shines a poignant light on family life, regret, and gratitude. Grades 9-12. --Anne OMalley
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (July 23, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 144241264X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1442412644
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.2 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,424,728 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is the best book I have read in a long time. Not just as a young adult book, but as any kind of book. The first chapter was so hilarious I could hardly put it down. And even as it moves on to more serious content it remains a fun and enjoyable read. It is one of those rare books that I found myself reading more and more slowly as I got closer to the end because I didn't want the story to be over.

Although it is a teen book adult characters are an integral part of the story and are portrayed very realistically and believably, rather than appearing as mere caricatures. The teenagers are also portrayed realistically. There are no good guys or bad guys, just people finding their way among all the difficult choices to be made in daily life.

Humor is used as a necessary ingredient for getting through all the messes we find ourselves in from time to time. I found myself laughing often and stopping to re-read sentences and even whole sections that serve as a reminder of this. But I also found myself moved to tears because I felt what the characters were feeling and could understand the hope and sorrow that is also a part of life and the complicated relationships between parents and children.
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Format: Hardcover
Laugh out loud funny, plot twists and genuine characters, I could not put this book down! Enjoyment from cover to cover...highly recommended.

It will be a holiday gift for all of the "young adults" on my gift list this year.

Enjoy.
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Format: Hardcover
I wasn't sure if I would like this but it turned out to be a fantastic read! The author has a distinctive style that is funny and thoughtful. The characters are complex, interesting, and feel very much alive - flaws and all. Besides being creative and witty, it's a wonderful story about life, learning, and maturing without being heavy handed.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Counterfeit Family Tree of Vee Crawford Wong. Review by Stephen Hurley
A high school student with a Chinese father and an American mother is asked to write a history paper describing his family. He’s so ignorant of his genealogy that he promptly makes one up. And I feel another tiresome YA theme coming on—that is, until I read a few pages and find what a brilliant twist this debut author has given multiculturalism, a theme that so many others have turned into a cliché.
Vee’s hopes and fears feel real from the start. L. Tam Holland’s humor and unwillingness to pull punches on what has become a landscape of politically correct stories on cultural assimilation is what really makes Wong a hilarious and heartfelt coming of age tale for the 21st century.
Just read Vee’s attempt to explain his failure as a basketball manager to his parents over dinner:
“We sat in a sticky booth and ordered prawns in sweet-and-sour slime, kung pao chicken and oily chow mein. Mom and Dad asked about the basketball game, and I tried to remember the parts that didn’t include me or Adele or Riley. I was amazed they couldn’t see right through me. They didn’t sense that things were terribly wrong. At least I knew that their lives were a complicated, secretive mess. They didn’t know anything about me, and they were stupid enough to believe me whenever I told them that things were just fine.”
What a welcome relief from all those stories where the stereotypical Asian family magically assimilates and sends their child to an Ivy League school. I nearly fell out of my chair when I found out that the voice of a boy who had gotten in my head for over three-hundred-pages was created by a female author. L. Tam Holland is a writer to watch. And to read…
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Not only was it a great story, it was incredibly well written. I really related to all the characters, who were flawed and believable in their own way. And as a mom pushing 40, I felt I had an interesting perspective that straddled the parents' actions and Vee's. I didn't expect a YA novel to be so thought-provoking and engaging. Looking forward to the next title from this author.
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