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The Crayon Box that Talked Paperback – October 21, 1997

4.8 out of 5 stars 125 customer reviews

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Paperback, October 21, 1997
$8.95 $13.66

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 2?In this mawkish, didactic tale (a tie-in book to the TV show The Crayon Box), quarrelsome talking crayons learn to appreciate one another when the narrator draws with them, thus showing them how each helps create a bigger picture. The message of the book, to learn to appreciate rather than dislike other people's differences, is conveyed Limburger-strong (and just as cheesy) through the unremarkable rhyming text. The illustrator uses a cartoonish, faux-childlike style and a cross-hatched layering technique to create pictures that are busy rather than vivid. The lack of borders and use of matte paper make them appear crammed into the pages. The colors (especially an overused Pepto-Bismol pink and a ruined-in-the-laundry white) are distracting. Skip this cloying book in favor of Patricia Hubbard's breezy My Crayons Talk (Holt, 1996), which gets the childlike art right and spares readers the weight of the Big Important Message.?July Siebecker, Hubbard Memorial Library, MA
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From the Inside Flap

"While walking through a toy store, the day before today, I overheard a crayon box with many things to say..." Once upon a time, Shane DeRolf wrote a poem. It was a deceptively simple poem, a charming little piece that celebrates the creation of harmony through diversity. The folks at the Ad Council heard it--and liked it so much that they made it the theme for their 1997 National Anti-Discrimination Campaign for Children. Following on the heels of nearly a year's worth of televised public service announcements, Random House is phonored to publish the picture book, illustrated in every color in the crayon box by dazzling newcomer Michael Letzig and conveying the sublimely simple message that when we all work together, the results are much more interesting and colorful.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 and up
  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers (October 21, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679986111
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679986119
  • Product Dimensions: 10.4 x 7.6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (125 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,045,898 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By G. Badalamenti on February 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
As a school social worker I'm using this book to talk to a predominantly African-American 1st grade class who is having problems with teasing due to being too light or too dark. After I read the book I have them hold up their pointer finger and pretend it's a crayon. I tell them to scribble on their desk with their crayon and then look at the scribbles of the kids around them. The color that is produced is the color of their skin. They see that none of the shades are exactly the same, and that leads into a discussion of why we treat people differently due to skin color. It puts a somewhat complex concept into simple terms and is a delight to read. Kids love it!
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Format: Paperback
I read the book The Crayon Box That Talked to my 2nd Grade students. We all thought that the book was super! We talked about the differences in each other and the students each told another student something they liked about them. The students felt good about themselves and each other! This was a great book to start off our Peace Unit. As a diverse staff, we gave this book as a gift to our principal with simple messages of how we complement each other and as a staff we make a complete picture because of our uniqueness! Thanks Shane! Ms. Roushonda Morrison, 2nd Grade Teacher
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Format: Hardcover
I thought the story had a great message. But I was bothered by the fact that every person in the book had white skin. The message was about the crayons getting along and coming together to make a beautiful picture, so it seemed obvious that the theme of diversity should be carry out across subjects in the book. After all wasn't that the authors's intent? Wasn't the intention to have children relate the experience to their own relationships? I hope a 2nd edition of this book is made containing diverse people...once that is done it will get 5 stars from me.
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Format: Hardcover
This book was great. While attending the TASC (Tennessee Student Council) state convention, one of our keynote speakers read us this book. This was to about 650 junior high and high school students. The kids loved the book. It is one of those books that no matter how old you are, it carries a powerful message. I am buying it for myself (36 year old teacher) and my classes.
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Format: Board book Verified Purchase
This is a beautifully written story about acceptance and being open to others. The crayons who think they are the most important color, learn that the pictures are more beautiful . . more complete when all of the colors are used to make them. A definite MUST HAVE in any library. ((perhaps more grown ups should read this story!))
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Format: Hardcover
We regularly use this book for team building training for teens and adults. Before "story time" we hand out crayons to the group. The participants are asked what color they would like and then are given a different color (as an example that in life you don't get to pick your gifts and talents!). And then everyone gets to sign the book with their crayon. This book is a hit with all ages and a fun way of dealing with the serious topics of respecting differences and working as a team.
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Format: Hardcover
This is my son's favorite book. I used to read it to him (he's 4) but now he reads it to me...and I learn something new everytime he does.
The poem is simple yet profound...it's about a box of crayons that doesn't get along until...well, read it and find out!!!
It's a must have for all home libraries. Adults can learn a lot from this book, too.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a great book about liking different colors, but that everyone is entitled to their opinions, and if we all work together all the colors can be beautiful, and the result more interesting. We also discussed race and ethnicity, that people come in all colors and all are to be respected and loved equally.
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