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Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Hardcover (as pictured). All pages clean, bright and unmarked. Former owners name on title page. Binding is tight. Not an ex library. Free delivery confirmation number is provided for your peace of mind!
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The Creed of the Old South, 1865-1915 Hardcover – 1979

4.3 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 126 pages
  • Publisher: Arno Press (1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0405106025
  • ISBN-13: 978-0405106026
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,924,225 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Mike on December 15, 2010
Format: Audible Audio Edition
Most American Civil War histories available today were written by the victors. Dr. Gildersleeve gives us a unique view, as a southerner who experienced the conflict as both a civilian and as a soldier. He was a professor of Greek at the University of Virginia for nine months and spent three months of each year of the war as a member of the Army of Virginia.

Life was not easy for civilians of the confederacy during or after the war. A very interesting view of life in the South prior to, during and after the war.
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It's a short read, but it takes you through the actual times and gives you the mindset of southerners. It will make you consider the events going on, and how they got up to 1865. You will walk away with a different prospective than what you had from high school history and college classes on the period. I should note....there are at least a dozen passages in the book....which are great pieces of writing.
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I have been interested in the causes and ramifications of the U.S. Civil was for awhile. This book has given me a rare opportunity to hear from the side that lost the war. They say that the victors write history so when the opportunity arises to hear from the other side I like to listen.
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Avery good read of the opinion of one who was there and lived through a very difficult time for Southerners.
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Good look back at history nd the "why" of many things
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This book (really a pamphlet) is more than just an apologia by a defeated rebel. It is an enlightened look at the motivations behind those who fought for the Confederacy, as well as the post-war adjustments they made.

The author makes a number of statements that I find hard to accept, but does it in such a way that is thought-provoking. For example, he maintains that the average rebel soldier had deep understanding of the politics of the time, that they were not mislead into war, and that slavery was only a test of a larger principle of local autonomy and not the proximate cause of the war.

I find his discussion of this last issue to be the most interesting. I have often thought that it was a shame that states' rights were decided over something as onerous as slavery. Had slavery not been the major force behind the war, the discussion of the limits of a central government might have been decided differently. As happened, local autonomy was (and is) discredited by the South's refusal to accept any method of or time table for the elimination of human bondage. I think it would be easier to protect ourselves from over-reaching federal government had we not thrown out all aspects of states' rights.

The author also makes other thought-provoking observations. Writing during reconstruction, he argues that the nation would have been better off if the southern states had been allowed to retain their state governments intact, rather than be subject to military rule. I am sure he is right -- were it not that he ignores reconstruction and post reconstruction racism.

His is a viewpoint forged and tempered in his times. But as he points out, it is important to know not just how wars end, but how they begin.
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