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Critique of Judgement (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – August 31, 2009

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Nicholas Walker is a freelance translator whose translations include work by Adorno, Heidegger, Habermas, Goethe and others; he has published widely on Hegel as well as Heidegger. He was formerly Junior Research Fellow at Magdalene College, Cambridge (1991-4)
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Product Details

  • Series: Oxford World's Classics
  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; Revised edition (August 31, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199552460
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199552467
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 1 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #124,258 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The Critique of the Power of Judgment (the 3rd Critique) is the most important work in Modern philosophical aesthetics. The Guyer and Pluhar editions are to be preferred to that of Bernard, as the first two have more extenisve notes, and better translations, including of the First Introduction.
The 3rd Critique presents a vision of beauty, sublimity, and art that avoids reduction of them to them to the biological, a la Nietzsche or Freud. Instead, Kant describes the *justification* of reflective aesthetic judgments in terms of the conditions for using jugment, stressing the contemplative and harmonious character of the experience of beauty. Beauty is linked to cognitive and moral betterment; sublimity, a secondary subject, is discussed more purely in terms of it connection with morality.
The work is difficult; however, there is no substitute for close reading of the whole work. (Certainly not Schiller, who goes far beyond Kant in claiming beauty and art as foundational for knowledge). The 3rd Critique is still very contemporary in its import, including its theory of disinterestedness, which is compatible with intelligent accounts of affect.
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Format: Paperback
Kant is by far one of the hardest philosophers to understand. Perhaps the toughest part is that Kant ruminates for several pages on the same subject. If the reader lets go and takes the reading with a trance-like state, then the reading is not so hard to understand. Another suggestion: read the first part of the sentence and skip all the commas, and read the very last part of the sentence; then go back and read the whole sentence including all the phrases in between the main clause. This will open up the eyes to understanding all the tangents Kant tends to take. A must must must read for those who want to understand the philosophical development of "man and nature" and its progressive development to our post-structural times. Enjoy the pleasure ... or pain of reading this wonderful book.
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Format: Paperback
One of the tests of true genius in a writer/philosopher is the degree of interest that he caused both in his day and in ours. On this count alone, Immanuel Kant qualifies based on the impact of his theories on his contemporaries and on future theorists who saw in his books a justification for their own ranging from reader-response to Post-Structuralism to feminism. Kant's lasting claim to fame hinges on a trio of books in which he examines the relation between objects in the material world and how human beings perceive and internalize their significance. In the CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON (1781), Kant initiated a "Copernican Revolution," testing how human beings could apprehend knowledge of the external world even as they admitted that this knowledge was of the a priori variety (not based on experience). In the CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON (1788), he defined practical reason as a variation of human morality that required each person to refrain from acts that he would not wish to see everyone else similarly engage in. Kant very likely saw that the first book's focus on the sensible world created a void between that realm of sensibility and the supersensible (nonmaterial) realm of the second. Kant's third book, the CRITIQUE OF JUDGMENT (1790) was his attempt to reconnect the confined state of man as described in the first with the liberated state as noted in the second.

Reading Kant is an exercise in taxed patience and cumulative frustration. His prose style is totally abstract with most sentences having multiple clauses. CRITIQUE OF JUDGMENT is no exception; however, the diligent reader will find that multiple readings combined with underlining and outlining will usually unravel the point.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher who is perhaps the founder of "modern" philosophy, with his focus on epistemology (theory of knowledge); he wrote many books, such as Critique of Pure Reason, Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics, Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone, etc. [NOTE: page numbers refer to the 339-page paperback edition.]

He wrote in the Preface, "We may call the faculty of cognition from principles a priori pure reason, and the inquiry into its possibility and bounds generally the Critique of Pure Reason... That [critique] goes merely into our faculty of knowing things a priori and busies itself therefore only with the cognitive faculty, to the exclusion of the feeling of pleasure and pain and the faculty of desire..." (Pg. 3) He continues, "Whether now the judgment, which in the order of our cognitive faculties forms a mediating link between understanding and reason, has also principles a priori for itself; whether these are constitutive or merely regulative ... and whether they give a rule a priori to the feeling of pleasure and pain, as the mediating link between the cognitive faculty and the faculty of desire... these are the questions with which the Critique of Judgment is concerned." (Pg. 4)

He explains, "if the singular representation of the object of the judgment of taste... were transformed by comparison into a concept, a logically universal judgment cold result therefrom...
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