Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $28.00
  • Save: $8.65 (31%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Cronkite's War: His World... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Gently used, pages are clean, no stickers or highlighting.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home Hardcover – May 7, 2013

3.8 out of 5 stars 66 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$19.35
$0.95 $0.01

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$19.35 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home
  • +
  • Assignment to Hell: The War Against Nazi Germany with Correspondents Walter Cronkite, Andy Rooney, A .J. Liebling, Homer Bigart, and Hal Boyle
Total price: $32.76
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

"Fascinating glimpses of a stirring time that was a crucible for so many journalists." School Library Journal starred review

"What a treasure! If you like the news, if you like a good adventure story or if you're just a sucker for a good old fashioned love story, you will love this book." —Bob Schieffer, CBS News

"The immediacy of these letters provides an unforgettable glimpse into how people lived during the most devastating war in human history, and shed light on how Walter Cronkite became one of our greatest newsmen." —Susan Eisenhower

"An extraordinary journey with the most trusted man in America." Kirkus Reviews

“There’s no question that Cronkite’s book represents a bygone era of journalism.” --The Washingtonian 
 
 “A fascinating and informative collection of Walter Cronkite Jr.’s personal World War II letters to his wife." --AARP blog

"Something not all would expect: A completely different side of Walter Cronkite.” --CBS News 

"A highly personal view of the man whose face became familiar to every American in the 1960s and ’70s." --The Buffalo News 

"
Illustrated with heartwarming photos of Walter and Betsy Cronkite during the war from the family collection." --Book Bargains & Previews 

"Tom Brokaw, whose career followed Cronkite's, describes this book as the 'quintessential American story.' Indeed it is." --NewsOK
 

About the Author

WALTER CRONKITE IV is an associate producer with CBS News. 

MAURICE ISSERMAN is the Publius Virgilius Rogers Professor of History at Hamilton College.
His most recent book is the prize-winning Fallen Giants: A History of Himalayan Mountaineering from the Age of Empire to the Age of Extremes, co-written with Stewart Weaver, which the New York Times called "the book of a lifetime...an awe-inspiring work of history and storytelling."
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: National Geographic; 1 edition (May 7, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1426210191
  • ISBN-13: 978-1426210198
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1.2 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #836,401 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on April 24, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was looking forward to this book. Growing up in Britain in the 40s and 50s I heard a considerable amount about the war and the numerous hardships it brought. I hoped this book would give me some more insight, but Cronkite lived what was then regarded as a luxurious life. He stayed in hotels or rented expensive apartments.

The average American soldier had access to the PX, with all the foods in it that were denied to the British. Cronkite spent most of his time living in London, and would take short periods to go to American airbases around Britain. He'd interview many of the bomber crews and his published articles brought home what the war was like.

However, the British had a term about American servicemen in England. They said that Americans only had three problems - "They were overpaid, oversexed, and over here." But of course that was how civilians saw them. The Nazis didn't give Americans any special treatment and tried to kill them just as much as they tried to kill British bomber crews.

When you read the little bits of Cronkite's articles you can see how he involved the American public in the war in Europe. But when it came to writing home to his wife, he was obviously very loving, but he could not put any details about the war. I searched for nuggets about life in England at that time, but there wasn't that much.

So, as someone said here, is one letter to his wife the same as all the rest? It's tempting to say that, but if you are separated from your loved one you will tend to repeat yourself. His wife was beautiful, from the photos in the book, and he obviously missed his dog as well. But I'm sure there were American soldiers all over Europe who were writing the same sort of things.

Cronkite was no coward.
Read more ›
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home does not disappoint in its glimpses into the private life of the broadcasting icon as he shared his experiences with the love of his life in letters home. The book is written by Cronkite's grandson and namesake in collaboration with Maurice Isserman and is a study in respect and admiration, tinged by just a touch of envy -that envy that every historian feels for those who lived in the world we can only experience vicariously.

As you read the letters the young Walter wrote to his beloved Betsy, you see his brave front in perilous places, and can enjoy and admire his careful recounting of moments he had to know were historic in order that the woman who shared his life could share these times with him.

I love this historical period, and read and study everything I can about it. That aside, I grew up, as many of us did, watching Walter Cronkite bring honest journalism into my world, and now I am reading about the world that formed the man himself. It is heady stuff, and I recommend this book heartily.
Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
A book titled Cronkite's War would seem to have at least two enthusiastic audiences: fans of the late Walter Cronkite, famously referred to as "the most trusted man in America," and readers interested in World War II. The title, however, is a bit misleading, and it's the subtitle that gets to the heart of the matter: "His World War II Letters Home." The subtitle would seem to betoken an appeal to the same two audiences, and in a more intimate, less formal way, as if to say "this is what Cronkite really thought and felt, an eyewitness account produced by one of our most respected journalists."

Unfortunately, however, things don't work out that way, and the reader is left with Cronkite's officially censored letters to his wife Betsy, which are a good deal less informative and less interesting than one might expect. I'm tempted to say that if you've read one of Cronkite's letters to Betsy, you're read them all. That, however, would be a misrepresentation, but not by much. There is an enormous amount of repetition from letter to letter about the most mundane things imaginable. The life of a correspondent based in London and covering the air war over Europe was sometimes exhausting, sometimes frantic in a catch-as-catch-can way, occasionally a bit scary, and, if you worked for United Press, poorly paid. But for occasional exceptions -- firing at a German fighter plane with the nose gun of a bomber and landing with glider-borne troops to mop up after D-Day -- there is really nothing interesting, exciting, or particularly informative in Cronkite's letters.
Read more ›
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Walter Cronkite begins the book by telling the story of how he entered the reporting industry. At the time the Great Depression was in full swing, Europe was being devastated by the Nazis on one front, England was being bombed, the Japanese were on an Imperialistic land grab and preparing to bomb the United States at Pearl Harbor. Belgium was soon to be overrun and all was in a state of flux.

Cronkite sails on ships in the North Atlantic and heavily engaged by German U-Boats. Over 1,000 cargo and troop carriers were being sunk in the north Atlantic during this time. Then Cronkite and his reporting buddies join up with the 8th Army Air Force n England, after a brief stay in North Africa, and after some training they are allowed to fly with the bombers on their missions over France and Germany. That was at a time when we were losing 6 out of 10 planes on these missions. A minimum of 60 brave aviators and any brass or newspapermen who dared fly on these suicide missions were in Harm's Way. And Cronkite was one of them.
With his portable typewriter, he wrote his wife a letter everyday and sometimes more than one a day. He described the happenings and his personal experiences during the war years between 1943 and 1945 that he was active in Europe without ever returning home even for a short visit.

He wrote such beautiful love letters to his wife and described such horrid scenes of war. It defies his imagination that man can kill at will and still love so deeply, all on the same day. Read it now so you will fully understand the memory of man at war and the inhumane conditions he witnessed while longing just to return home to the United States and live in peace with his wife.. A very touching story.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home