Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$12.81
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: (HARDCOVER) The book shows normal wear and tear. All shipping handled by Amazon. Prime eligible when you order from us!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Crossed Fingers: How the Liberals Captured the Presbyterian Church Hardcover – September, 1996

4.8 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$69.43 $8.83

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1096 pages
  • Publisher: Inst for Christian Economics (September 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0930464745
  • ISBN-13: 978-0930464745
  • Product Dimensions: 2.2 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,033,215 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

Customer Reviews

5 star
75%
4 star
25%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
(NOTE: This is one of those rare Gary North books which is not wildly controversial even within conservative circles. Conservatives of whatever variety will love this. Only Liberals will hate it.)
Gary North here accomplishes what no one else has even attempted: a thorough look at how the liberals took over the most prominent Mainline denomination. You may think this is old news: it's not. You may think it's irrelevant: you're wrong.
Southern Baptists should pay especially close attention (and North heavily tips his hat to Paul Pressler and Paige Patterson): this is the same general plan of attack that was used in the SBC up to the conservative resurgence. It is also the ongoing strategy in many of our state conventions and at schools like Baylor and Wake Forest.
Crossed Fingers is both a scholarly history that everyone from John Frame to Adrian Rogers will appreciate, and an action manual for how to defeat liberal takeovers. It's a big book (a very big book), and some people might get lost in the preface and the forward (if you sense yourself getting lost, just move on to the Introduction. I don't recommend this, but it's a valid option), but it is must reading for anyone who cares about keeping the church faithful to it's Master.
(See also Paul Pressler's new "A Hill on Which to Die.")
Comment 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Gary North does an excellent job showing how the PCUSA became a liberal church. It is complete yet interesting. Too often Reformed people (and other Christians) do not understand what causes a denomination to be corrupted. North, armed with an optimistic postmillenial world view, shows that it is weak adherence to Reformed standards that brings about this corruption. An amillenialist could not have written a book this well or this interesting, because an amillenialist has no sure hope for the church's reformation. The only thing I wish North had included is a discussion of how premillenialism, a theology held to by most of the New School party in the 1920s, contributed to the final takeover by modernists. North is right when he says similliar books need to be written by conservatives in other apostate denominations. It is hoped that others will write on the United Presbyterian Church, the Reformed Church in America, and the United Church of Christ. If you are a Presbyterian pastor or elder, and you only read one book this year, make sure it is this one!
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Crossed Fingers: How the Liberals Captured the Presbyterian Church

Gary North

available online at: [...]

although i found it difficult to read online and purchased a second hand copy.

How do you review a 1000 page book?

Well, i finished it, actually quite an accomplishment. For North is an author i love to hate, i put the book down in disgust and picked it up the next day because i don't want to miss anything. North is a polemic, a fighter, nasty, often name calling, self centered, provocative, interesting, wordy, well i guess you get the picture. What the book is not: it is not strictly history, but rather something a little higher up the food chain, philosophic/theological interpretation of history, conspiracy theory, covenant theory in action, something like all these mixed together. North's extraordinary value as a writer and as a theologian is the confidence and strength his well tuned mental system produces in his works. His confidence in himself and his ideas is oftentimes overwhelming and always alluring. The problem i have is that i always put the book(s) down and have to ask myself "is this really true?" or "is this really Scriptural?" or is he overstating the case to win the debate in his mind. That is the great weakness of this book in particular, it really needed 6 months of careful research and fact checking in 1996 when it was published. You are always aware that he seems to bend the facts, both by omission and by simply being confidently wrong in order to support and prove his theories.

His big ideas are interesting and worth the time it takes to wade through the book.
Read more ›
1 Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I thoroughly enjoy Gary North. I suspect most hate him. He's very blunt with his opinions and this book is certainly no exception. Sure, it's 1000 pages, but North is an easy read and the subject is very interesting.

As to the potential popularity of this book - I think North sums it up pretty good at the beginning of the book:

"I wrote this book for Christians who are tired of being milked, bilked, and forced to ride
silently in the back of humanism's bus. If this is you, keep reading. Understand, however,
that you are part of a small remnant: a person who is willing to pick up a book about one
aspect of Presbyterian Church history. The final remnant will be even smaller: those who
finish reading this book. Few are called; even fewer are chosen. But cheer up; there are
words of comfort available: "Woe is me, my mother, that thou hast borne me a man of strife
and a man of contention to the whole earth! . . . . The LORD said, Verily it shall be well
with thy remnant; verily I will cause the enemy to entreat thee well in the time of evil and in
the time of affliction" (Jer. 15:10a-11)."

Albert Jay Nock spoke of a remnant too - but he was certainly no postmillennialist like North. Despite the depressing picture North paints in this history, he remains faithfully committed to a view of things getting better in the end.

PROS:
- a thorough history of presbyterianism with particular emphasis of the battle with liberalism in the 1800-1900s
- North publishes his own books and so he is not at the mercy of editorial approval
- North is fairly repetitive. It's intentional. It helps to retain the idea he is presenting. If you read this book, you will have expressions like, "The crucial issue was sanctions.
Read more ›
4 Comments One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse