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Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Paperback. Slight general wear. 7x4.25 inches. Not ex-library. Text unmarked. Usually ships morning after receipt of order. Profits support poetry publishing company. Box S114
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Cryptozoic! Paperback – March, 1977

3.4 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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About the Author

Brian W. Aldiss was born in Norfolk, England, in 1925. Over a long and distinguished writing career, he has published award-winning science fiction (two Hugo Awards, a Nebula Award, and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award); bestselling popular fiction, including the three-volume Horatio Stubbs saga and the four-volume the Squire Quartet; experimental fiction such as Report on Probability A and Barefoot in the Head; and many other iconic and pioneering works, including the Helliconia Trilogy. He has edited many successful anthologies and has published groundbreaking nonfiction, including a magisterial history of science fiction (Billion Year Spree, later revised and expanded as Trillion Year Spree). Among his many short stories, perhaps the most famous is “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” which was adapted for film by Stanley Kubrick and produced and directed after Kubrick’s death by Steven Spielberg as A.I. Artificial Intelligence
 
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 191 pages
  • Publisher: Avon Books (March 1977)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380016729
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380016723
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,218,904 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By R. D. Webber on July 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In a foreword, Brian Aldiss questions whether or not reissuing this novel as an ebook is actually a very useful action.

Well, I tried to read Cryptozoic! ("An Age") 40 years ago and could not get through it, and I'm glad to know why. It's a fairly interesting book in its way, but it appears to be the product of a powerful brain packed with too much intellectual understanding of psychology and politics and not enough experience of the real world.

Aldiss had some interesting ideas in mind when he wrote this novel, and he was already a skillful and talented writer. Unfortunately, the characters are rather stiff and not very believable, his view of Britain's politics was pessimistic in a way that seems rather dated now, and he seems to have drunk more deeply of tincture of Stapledon in a large glass of Wells.

Still, glad I read it and finally understood that I hadn't gotten bogged down just because I was dim, but also because the most outlandish, science-fictional aspects were less alien to me than the extrapolation of 1960s Britain.
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Format: Paperback
Recently I obtained a copy of the Avon paperback printed in 1969, from a used bookstore. I read it when it first came out in 1967 but only one thing ever stayed with me: The "Amniote Egg". We all love time-travel stories and Keith Laumer has written some good ones, such as "Dinosaur Beach." When I re-read that a few years ago I was curious as to why the Amniote Egg wasn't there. The two books had fused somehow in my grey cells. I knew I was going to be happy when I found the good 'ol Egg in the Aldiss!

But in '67 I was 16 years old and I had not yet "turned on". My happiness turned to joy when I caught on to what was being presented here, thanks to all those LSD trips I took back in college. :)

Substitute LSD for CSD and the book makes sense.

Pages 76-77 (within the chapter "The Clock Analogy") give us the author's thinking, or thesis. "He saw now that one of the occasional reactions against a high-powered industrial society had set in some years earlier...[I]n the twenty-seventies, the new thing was mind-travel...A generation grew up which dedicated itself, its energies and abilities, to escaping from their own time."

That was exactly the attitude, the fear, of the establishment regarding young people in the 60s in America. "What if they gave a war and nobody came?" What if all these dropouts actually DO go back to the land and decline to participate in our high-power industrial society? Where will we be then? Everything was at stake, the way they saw it in the White House (and on page 71). All means were justified in co-opting and defusing The Movement. Radical groups were infiltrated, watched, subverted, even assassinated. The War On Drugs began, i.e., drug-users.

So Aldiss asks the classical SF questions, "What if...?
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Format: Paperback
I first read this book about twenty years ago and I still remember it fondly. In fact, I actually liked it so much I read it three times at various times throughout my life.

Every one wants pro's and con's, but I honestly have no 'cons' in regard to this book. If you like time travel based sci-fi in any form, then I can almost guarantee you'll love this book.

As to the other reviewer who said they read this book in a day, I would simply assume they read everybook in a day. It's not a short book at all, unless you compare it to 'Dune' maybe, but otherwise it's a meaty book that will keep you thinking as you read it. Then again, I like to savor good books on the journey reading them, and this was one of them.

Well worth the time for any time travel fan.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've always seen Mr. Aldiss on the bookseller shelves. I firgured that an author with such staying power deserved a try out on the Kindle freebie list. However, I could not finish the book. The hero may have matured with the story but I lost interest in what I considered to be a bleak depiction of our future society and their forms of research and amusement. I admit I'm more a fan of bright optimism.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is one of the worst books I’ve ever read. Bad plot, dialog, characters and writing. Story is about how drugs permit mental time travel. Hero comes home from distant eras (where he met very Brando-esque motorcycle, er, hovercycle gang), discovers fascists now rule, is trained as an assassin to go into the past and kill a rogue scientist. Long, dull stretches, juvenile plot developments, stupid “psychology”, embarrassing female characterizations. Author drops hints that he’s done acid (what daring!). Long winded finale: turns out time actually goes backwards! Reads like a tired, failed parody. Terrible in every way. A real turkey. Yeah, yeah, I know we're supposed to cut older sci-fi a lot of slack (often a WHOLE lot) but not this time, no way.
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