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Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace Hardcover – April 22, 2014

4.1 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for Cubed:

"... Excellent ... fresh and intellectually omnivorous ... Saval is a vigorous writer, and a thoughtful one. What puts him above the rank of most nonfiction authors, even some of the better ones, is that he doesn’t merely present information. He turns each new fact over in his mind, right in front of you, holding it to the light."
—Dwight Garner, The New York Times

"Cubed is...a pleasure to read: beautifully written and clearly organized. Since many Americans now, women as well as men, spend more than half their waking hours at work, it's also an important exploration."
—Richard Sennett, The New York Times Book Review

"Lush, funny, and unexpectedly fascinating ... [G]enius ... Cubed stands as one of those books readers can open to any page and find the kind of insight they’ll want to yank strangers out of their bus or subway seats and repeat ... [A] beautifully written, original, and essential masterpiece."
—Jerry Stahl, Bookforum

"There are a lot of books about work... but Cubed offers something different: an entertaining look at the history of the modern worker that the modern worker can actually learn from."
Rosecrans Baldwin, NPR

"Impressive... Beautifully written... delightfully readable..." 
Martin Filler, The New York Review of Books

"Thorough and diligent...Saval works hard, and effectively, to demonstrate how the evolution of workspaces paralleled social shifts in the workforce that we’re still living out.... Saval is a tireless researcher, and he turns phrases with a flair that would get an Organization Man fired."
Jennifer Howard, The Washington Post Book World

"... Cleverly pieced together...subtle and sophisticated."
—Jill Lepore, The New Yorker

"Nikil Saval's new book, Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace, is a fascinating guide to the intellectual history of the American office. Part cultural history, part architectural analysis and part management theory—with some labor economics, gender studies and pop culture thrown in for good measure—the book is a smart look at the evolution of the place where we spend so much of our lives."
The Washington Post

"In his first book, Saval sets out to chronicle the evolution of the American office from airless prison to what it is today, reflecting upon the transformation of the office worker from emasculated novelty to unremarkable figure of ubiquity. To accomplish this, he synthesizes an impressive number of books, films, articles, and first-person accounts relating to the daunting number of historical forces and ideologies that have shaped white-collar work: architecture, philosophy, labor disputes, class conflict, the women’s movement, and technological advances, just to name a few. Saval considers each of them, forming a cogent and compelling narrative that could very easily have been scattered or deathly dull. To keep things lively, Saval deploys deft analytical skills and a tone that’s frequently bemused, making difficult and important concepts palatable to the casual reader."
The Boston Globe

"Over the past week, as I've been carrying around a copy of Nikil Saval's Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace, I've gotten some quizzical looks. 'It's a history of the office,' I'd explain, whereupon a good number of people would respond, 'Well, that sounds boring.' It isn't. In fact, Cubed is anything but... Saval's book glides smoothly between his two primary subjects: the physical structure of offices and the social institutions of white-collar work over the past 150 years or so. Cubed encompasses everything from the rise of the skyscraper to the entrance of women in the workplace to the mid-20th-century angst over grey-flannel-suit conformity to the dorm-like 'fun' workplaces of Silicon Valley. His stance is skeptical, a welcome approach given that most writings on the contemporary workplace are rife with dubious claims to revolutionary innovation—office design or management gimmicks that bestselling authors indiscriminately pounce on like magpies seizing glittering bits of trash."
Salon.com

"Five days a week I commute to a skyscraper in the main business district of a large city and sit at a desk within whispering distance of another desk. Whatever the word 'work' used to conjure, my version is now quite standard. About 40 million Americans make a living in some sort of cubicle. Are we happy about that? The likelihood that we are not is central to Nikil Saval's impressive debut, Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace."
The New Republic

"... Formidable ... Beautifully rendered ... Sections of the book shine—especially when it discusses gender in the workplace ... The elegance of his prose and the intensity of his moral commitment linger."
The Nation

"... Cubed is so stimulating, so filled with terrific material and shrewd observations, that it’s a must-read for anyone pondering how America arrived at its current state of white-collar under-employment and economic insecurity."
—The Daily Beast

"...[A] sharp and absorbing history of the office."
The Economist

"Saval's book... stands out as one of the best pop histories to come out in years, and on a topic that most of us (statistically speaking) can relate to."
Fast Company

"[An] absorbing history of office life...It sits cheerily between the academic and the journalistic register...Saval's style is nicely spiked with colloquialism... [His] debunking temper serves him well."
The Guardian

"... An entertaining read ... Saval's readings of pop culture representations of the office and its workers add a lively and ironic perspective."
Publishers Weekly

"Ferociously lucid and witty."
Kirkus Reviews

"A sprightly historical tour of the vexed, overplanned world of the modern workplace."
—In These Times

“Why did no one write this necessary book before now? Never mind: it wouldn’t have been as good. Cubed has that combination of inevitability and surprise that marks the best writing—and thinking.”
—Benjamin Kunkel, author of Indecision
 
“Required reading for anyone who works in an office, and for those fortunate enough to have escaped.”
—Ed Park, author of Personal Days
 
"Nikil Saval is a superstar! He does for offices what Foucault did for prisons and hospitals, transforming a seemingly static, purely functional, self-evident institution into a rich human story, full of good and bad intentions, chance, and historical forces. Reading Cubed is like watching an amazing magic trick where the very boringness of the office turns out to be what is the most interesting. I found myself wishing he would do waiting rooms next."
—Elif Batuman, author of The Possessed

About the Author

Nikil Saval is an editor of n+1. He lives in Philadelphia. This is his first book. His first two real jobs were as an editorial assistant in publishing companies—in cubicles.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday; 1st edition (April 22, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385536577
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385536578
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.4 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (63 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #209,974 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Louis N. Gruber VINE VOICE on April 14, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a fascinating treatise on work, particularly office work, white collar work, its history and development, from the nineteenth century clerk who may have worked next to the business owner in a cramped office, to the nameless clerical drones toiling in vast cubicle farms, to the age of the personal computer, to the angst-ridden workplace of the twenty-first century. The author explores not only the changing nature of work, but its architecture, its furniture, its psychology, management fads and foolishness, office politics, office sexuality, the mistreatment of women, the ever-changing fluid boundaries between work and home life, and many other topics. In the final chapter, a glimpse into the future, where a steady job with an office--or even a cubicle--may be increasingly rare.

Author Nikil Saval has incorporated enormous amounts of scholarship into this treatise, exploring great thinkers and outdated theorists of work, of offices, of interior design, of popular culture, the changing role of women in the workplace, the workplace in movies and cartoons, and the recurring struggles of the workers for autonomy and of management for control. Naturally I can't summarize this massive work for you, but it's well worth reading for yourself.

The book is surprisingly entertaining and reads at a brisk pace. It is not light reading but remains accessible. If you have ever enjoyed the tribulations of Dilbert or the ironic despair of Office Space, if you have ever wanted to know more about offices are designed and how they really work, this is a must read book for you. If you want to know what lies ahead for the white collar worker, you may find it disturbing. I recommend this one with five well-deserved stars. Reviewed by Louis N. Gruber.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Saval's book is a "must-read" for anyone interested in the world of work. For one thing, the author chose a topic that's gotten little attention from researchers or popular writers. He takes us through the history of the office, going back to the days of all-male offices with male clerks. He traces the development of office equipment - not just typewriters, but even desks and filing cabinets.

We also get reminded of past workplace trends.

Remember GIlbreth's Cheaper By The Dozen? This family dynamic was fueled by an offshoot of Taylorism, a system of measuring productivity that seems cruel to many of us today.

And then remember the 40s, 50s and 60s? The world of Mad Men and the movie The Best of Everything? Women dressed up in dresses, hose and heels (girdles, too!) sitting at rows of typewrters. Katherine Gibbs School was the female Harvard MBA, an entry to the most elite secretarial positions.

Cubed then fast forwards to the present, where companies experiment with a variety of formats, including open offices resembling coffee shops and coworking spaces.

Cubed is best read as a series of loosely themed chapters. My only quibble is that the focus of the chapters (what social scientists call the unit of analysis) shifts. Clerks, secretaries, engineers, call center workers, and software developers might work in similar spaces, but their perspectives will be different, as they have widely divergent opportunities for promotion, marketability and day-to-day flexibility. An engineer sitting in a cubicle probably can take off a couple of hours to get a hair cut or run an errand; a clerk or call center worker probably cannot do the same. That's huge.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I felt as if the author looked up every paper/film/book written with any reference to the office workspace, took a quote from it, and dedicated one paragraph to use the quote and follow up just enough to fill the paragraph before moving on to the next. The subject matter could change in the blink of an eye, and, more often than not, didn't move along the main idea of what I thought the book was going to be about - the history of the workplace - in one smooth narrative. It's more like endless references to things tangentially related to the office workplace. It seemed like an assignment for an undergraduate writing course that the teacher would pass just so they could stop reading it.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It was a pleasure to read Nikil Savan's book. Cubed is a survey of sources from architecture, business, academia and pop culture, organized to resemble a chronological history of the working environment provided to office workers. The tone of the book is collegial and a tad wry, as the topic expects, and the prose is substantial but not at all difficult.

If you're expecting that this title:subtitle will turn out to be ironic, well, it really isn't. This is not the Dilbert attitude in book form. This is a book that distinguishes a topic and gives the topic form. I work in a cubicle in a grid of 300 above two floors of similar grids. I sit 30 feet from a window wall and probably 100 feet from the closest potted plant. The questions and issues defined in this book are directly relevant to the first leg of each of my weekdays, so I had plenty of appetite for the content. If you can relate to office work, then I can recommend Cubed as an enjoyable read that will make you a more aware and informed consumer of the environment you have been provided.
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