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on November 1, 2016
While I do not feel that this book prepared me for the PMI-PBA exam, it was nevertheless an interesting read regarding the author's experiences while working with various clients. The book looks into customer interaction and issues that a business analyst may experience and while she doesn't give straight solutions, she tries to show you the tools and skills that you need to have at your disposal in order to resolve these issues on your own. A worthwhile read and an important book to have in your business analyst library!
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on February 12, 2002
Ivy F. Hooks and Kristin A. Farry give their audience a clear methodology about how to eliminate rework and unnecessary features rooted in poor requirement definition for making product development or procurement faster and cheaper without sacrificing the better. Good requirement definition is more important than ever to especially fast-paced high-tech companies for which researching, developing, and commercializing products on schedule and within budget is key to be, become, and remain competitive. Interestingly, Hooks and Farry explain to their readers the profound impact that culture, education, and management have on requirement definition. Their critical examination of the "seven cultural forces that define Americans" in chapter 2 helps their (foreign) audience better understand why some (American) marketers have no time to do it right the first time, but endless time and a company bankroll to do it wrong over and over again to quote Kevin J. Clancy and Peter C. Krieg in their excellent Counter-intuitive Marketing. Hooks and Farry remind their audience that nothing can change for the faster, cheaper, and better without a management commitment. Management must make very clear through their entire organization that quality products begin long before design and manufacture. These products find their genesis in quality requirements. To summarize, Customer-Centered Products is a must read for anyone involved/interested in product development or sourcing. The only weakness of the book lies in the concentration of examples from a few industries about which Hooks and Farry are very knowledgeable.
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on June 15, 2008
I picked this up based on other reviews. I have read dozens of books on this topic as I am a consultant and trainer in this field and this book is just average. If you are looking for a primer on an end to end process, perhaps this is decent for that. If you are a practitioner that has some experience in this process, you may also find some interesting sections to learn from, but you will have to dig a bit.

To be fair, finding a good book on this topic is elusive, but one I use in my classes is Managing Software Requirements - A Use Case Approach by Leffingwell and Widrig.
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on July 15, 2001
Hooks and Farry show you how to get it right the FIRST time, providing practical, easy to follow directions to achieve what every company wants - faster, better, cheaper products that are SUCCESSFUL. This book explains product management from an engineering perspective that is as practical as it is useful (unlike other books that put too much 'marketing spin' on product management, making it seem more like some mystical process). 3/4 of the way through this book I called the authors, and they are now coaching our entire company on this philosophy. And it's working!
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on April 28, 2014
The only bibliography I've found that goes straight to the point I need! Awesome delivery service! If you want to drve your actions looking for the customer's requirements...this is your book!
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on June 13, 2012
Every time I get in deep with requirements I stop, catch my breath, and flip through the pages of this book.

Practical. Easy to read. Effective. It has helped me numerous times on projects of various sizes and complexity. A definite must-have.
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on December 27, 2010
Very well written, very clear. One feels that was written by people that were "in the trenches", not academic or tool-selling guys (girls).
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on December 26, 2001
I am working on a key project and needed methodology to improve
how we specified the product we wanted. I found the book to be very useful and we are applying its methodology to our current project with great success. Only improvement might be additional info on what software is available to do requirements planning for smaller, non-software, related projects.
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on January 13, 2012
The book arrived sooner than I had expected. The condition of the book was good as it was described. Excellent service! Fast delivery!
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on November 21, 2000
This book will help managers save time, money, and schedule on development projects. It contains practical advice based on lessons learned on real projects. For example, data are provided that show that spending more effort on emerging the real requirements rather than simply using the customer's stated requirements can reduce costs by half! The authors recommend specific actions managers can take. They provide a set of useful checklists and suggestions for how to apply them. For example, what is the manager's role in developing good requirements? How can a project prioritize requirements so that resources are allocated consistently with real customer needs and expectations? How can important practices such as recording the rationale for each requirement, identifying and managing interfaces, and considering verification during requirements definition be implemented effectively? Hooks and Farry, both seasoned practitioners, have provided a valuable roadmap to help managers develop customer-centered products. The book is easy to read and the recommendations are easy to apply.
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