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A.D.D. Not B.A.D. Paperback – February, 2003

2.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 3-Jimmy can't ever sit still in class, and Mr. Jugardor encourages the other students to be tolerant of him. When the children wriggle and jump about after the teacher asks them to put ladybugs down their shirts, they understand what it's like to have A.D.D., just like Jimmy. Wyrick's illustrations almost resemble Tedd Arnold's work, with their bold, cheerful colors and black outlining. Unfortunately, the story is marred by cutesy names (Jimmy Jumpingbean, Sandy Sitstill, Brucie Big, etc.) and poor grammar ("Everyone raised their hand"). Mark Smith's Pay Attention, Slosh! (Albert Whitman, 1997), while written for a slightly older audience, deals with A.D.D. without sacrificing writing quality.
Linda Beck, Indian Valley Public Library, Telford, PA
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Penn takes her educational program, the Writing Penn, into schools, libraries, and children's hospitals. She is a sought-after conference speaker for groups of teachers and other professionals who work with children. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 and up
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Paperback: 33 pages
  • Publisher: Child Welfare League of Amer (February 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0878688498
  • ISBN-13: 978-0878688494
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 8.2 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,773,183 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
AD/HD is not a synonym for misbehavior.

Here are some superb books for children and teens with AD/HD.

Grades 1-3
Mrs. Gorski, I Think I Have Wiggle Fidgets, Barbara Esham
My Warp Speed Mind, Donalisa Helsley
Otto Learns About His Medicine, Matthew Galvin
Shelley, The Hyperactive Turtle, Deborah Moss
My Friend Has ADHD, Amanda Tourville
80HD: A Child’s Perspective On ADHD, Trish Wood
Annie’s Plan: Taking Charge of Schoolwork and Homework (attention, time management, organization, homework), Jeanne Kraus
Terrific Teddy’s Excessive Energy, Jim Forgan

1-6
All Dogs Have ADHD, Kathy Hoopmann

2-6
Jeanne Kraus- Get Ready for Jetty! My Journal About ADHD and Me, Cory Stories: A Kid’s Book about Living with ADHD

3-6
Captain Underpants series, Dav Pilkey
Slam Dunk: A Young Boy’s Struggle with Attention Deficit Disorder, Roberta Parker

3-7
Sparky’s Excellent Misadventures: My ADD Journal, Phyllis Carpenter

3-8
Journal of an ADHD Kid: The Good, the Bad, and The Useful, Tobias Stumpf

4-8
Joey Pigza series, Jack Gantos

6-12
ADHD and Me: What I Learned from Lighting Fires at the Dinner Table, Blake Taylor
ADHD in HD: Brains Gone Wild, Jonathan Chesner
A Bird’s-Eye View of Life with ADD and ADHD, Chris Zeigler Dendy
Positively ADD: Real Success Stories to Inspire Your Dreams, Catherine Corman
The Sensory Team Handbook (for sensory processing/integration symptoms of AD/HD), Nancy Mucklow

8-12
Understand Your Brain, Get More Done: The ADHD Executive Functions Workbook, Ari Tuckman
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Format: Paperback
Audrey Penn does a great job explaining the way a child with ADD/ADHD has to cope with ADD/ADHD. The teacher in the book starts off by talking about walking in someone elses shoes. Although it is hard to understand ADD/ADHD if you don't have it, this book shows a great example of what it is like to have ADD/ADHD. My husband and I read it in the pediatricians office and then bought it for our son. I also recommend this book to teachers to read to there students.
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Format: Paperback
Audrey Penn needs to stop writing. She hasn't written anything worth reading since "The Kissing Hand"--she's a total one-hit wonder. This book is AWFUL. Just absolutely awful. I had really high hopes for this despite my disappointment with "The Kissing Hand" companions. But this book is just a joke. The names of the characters are probably intended to be funny but are so off-the-wall that they're just distracting and ridiculous. The book is also entirely too wordy--even for bigger kids. No way are my 3rd graders going to sit still through this, and forget the younger kids. I was bored just a few pages in. The ADHD character doesn't take responsibility for his own behaviors or learn to cope with them. I like the message that everybody's ok despite their differences, but it gets lost in all the mess that this story is. Wouldn't recommend this to anyone.
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Format: Paperback
...and have a good time. I suppose this "author" was trying to promote the message that it's not little "Jimmy's" fault that he's a reckless little monster who tries to destroy the lives of those around him. Whatever Jimmy feels like getting away with, let him now attribute to his A.D.D. But mommy, but teacher, it was only my A.D.D. acting up. Ohhhh, ok then Jimmy, go about your business as usual.

Then there's the issue of the "teacher" having the kids put ladybugs down the kids shirts. Ok. Putting aside the deviant tendancies there, why not put ants in their pants? Then, why not shove bamboo rods under their fingernails? Brilliant idea.

This is a horrible little tale, one designed only to continue the current line of no-one should be accountable for their actions - it's all the fault of something else - kind of thinking. Furthermore, it's done by an "author" who can scarcely string together two sentences.

Avoid at all costs.
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