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D-Day, the Sixth of June

3.1 out of 5 stars 39 customer reviews


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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Robert Taylor portrays an American officer on the front lines of the massive Allied landing, whose special commando unit must destroy a key German gun position. But for Capt. Parker (Taylor), the mission is also fraught with personal complications because he and his commander (Richard Todd) are in love with the same woman (Dana Wynter). Featuring Edmond O'Brien, and building to a stirring climax on the beaches of Normandy, D-Day The Sixth Of June is a moving story of courage and sacrifice both on and off the battlefield.

Amazon.com

D-Day the Sixth of June is a misleading title for a very tame wartime romance with barely 10 minutes of combat in the last reel. What we mostly get is a year's worth of flashbacks depicting the reluctant, London-based affair of a married U.S. staff officer (Robert Taylor) and a British Red Cross worker (Dana Wynter) whose commando suitor (Richard Todd) is fighting in Africa. To be sure, the emotional desperation and embattled decency of good people in time of war is as worthy of film treatment as any military campaign, and the script works preinvasion Anglo-American tensions into the story. But the CinemaScope production is utterly formulaic, with leaden direction by Henry Koster. Wynter's porcelain beauty apparently didn't permit changes of expression, and Taylor looks about 15 years past his prime. On the plus side, the DVD serves up Lee Garmes's pleasantly pastel Deluxe Color with commendable crispness. --Richard T. Jameson

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Robert Taylor, Richard Todd, Dana Wynter, Edmond O'Brien, John Williams
  • Directors: Henry Koster
  • Writers: Harry Brown, Ivan Moffat, Lionel Shapiro
  • Producers: Charles Brackett
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 4.0), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), Spanish (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox
  • DVD Release Date: May 21, 2002
  • Run Time: 106 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000063URY
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #115,149 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "D-Day, the Sixth of June" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
The title of this movie is deceptive advertising, the war is a backdrop to a very predictable love triangle. There is about 15 minutes of decent action which recreates (but does not credit)the Point du Hoc battle. Robert Tayor is sincere but 10 years to old to be a Captain leading troops in 1946. Dana Wynter is pretty enough to inspire two manly suitors but oddly doesn't seem to have any real passionate feelings for either. The brit commando third of this triangle is likable but out of the picture for all but a few minutes at the beginning and at the end. In short, a chic flic spun with a not very compelling tried and true wartime love triangle. Solid actors try but fail with mediocre material.
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Format: VHS Tape
If you're expecting anything like "Saving Private Ryan" or "The Longest Day," you've come to the wrong film. This film focuses primarily on the love interests of Todd and Taylor for Dana Wynter (a rather lovely Dana at That). The second world war focuses primarily as a backdrop.
The film takes place in England and the English are stereotyped as American loathers and ingrates. This is admittedly hard for the viewer to stomach. We are also treated to a mundane script which doesn't give the good ol' boys (Richard Todd, Robert Taylor, Jerry Paris) much to chew on.
The film redeems itself somewhat in the end with an excellent although short pre-invasion landing on one of Normandy's beaches by American and British troops. The battle sequences are effective and very convincing as the group attempts to knock out a bunker complex.
In true Hollywood fashion, the film concludes with Dana Wynter fading into the sunset, having lost both her loves, one at the Normandy landing, the other through mutual self-righteousness. There's nothing to sink your teeth into here, but if you like candy coated versions of war, this is a good place to start.
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Format: DVD
Michael Bay must have studied this film before he made his own execrable "Pearl Harbor." In both cases, the filmmakers cynically titled their product after a famous WWII battle although they were really more interested in developing a dull, cliched love triangle than honestly confronting and exploring the meaning, experience, and drama of a significant historical event. At least, Bay relieved the tedium with some action. "D-Day" director Henry Koster doesn't address the actual invasion until the final ten minutes or so of this overlong film, and by then it is far too little far too late. Robert Taylor, Dana Wynter, and Richard Todd deliver their performances with all the animation of store-front mannequins. Taylor is far too old for this role, but Wynter, at least, is very nice to look at.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Viewers who want an all out action war movie with guns blazing and corpse strewn landscapes should avoid D-Day the Sixth of June. Released in 1956, the film looks back somewhat nostalgically at a war that was already beginning to fade into history. The world depicted seems remote as few people today have actually experienced total war. Today War World II has taken its place in history as the necessary war, the unquestioned war, unlike most of what has happened since--Vietnam, the Gulf War, Iraq and Afghanistan.

The movie explores large issues on a small scale. We follow a few individuals and how their lives were impacted by the events preceding the Normandy invasion. There is an elderly British Brigadier who has been left behind by modern warfare, a car salesman from Minneapolis who wants to be a general, a publisher's son-in-law invalided into a desk job, a British career soldier and a young woman from a sheltered background doing her part in the conflict.

The movie covers a number of themes including British American relations in the last year of the war, the dislocation of normal morality in wartime, the war-weariness of the British population as they hold out for yet another year of suffering. Behind all of it is the war, huge, bloodthirsty and seemingly endless. Everything is impacted--steaks are horse meat, cigarettes are a rarity, nights are pitch black with all light forbidden, sirens blare day and night.

The protagonists are Captain Brad Parker (Robert Taylor), an American who broke his leg on a parachute jump and has been relegated to desk work, Major John Wynter, a heroic British commando (actual war hero Richard Todd) and Valerie Russell (Dana Wynter), the young woman who comes to love them both.
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Format: DVD
Disapointing. I was looking forward to a good action movie, but most of the movie is a love story, and the movie only gets to D-Day at the very end. The title is misleading.
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Format: DVD
This 1956 effort is pure production line stuff given a CinemaScope and Stereophonic gloss, with the emphasis on romantic, rather than military, manoeuvres. Robert Taylor (understandably) loves Dana Wynter, who also (not so understandably) loves Richard Todd; Edmond O'Brien loves glory; and John Williams just hangs around the sidelines of both plot and frame as the quintessential old-world fogey. After much talk, guilt and plot contrivances, O'Brien loses his nerve, Taylor loses the girl and Todd loses even more. Waterloo Bridge it ain't.

Very much an American take on the invasion (although in fact it deals primarily with a diversionary raid), Taylor's arrogance and the screenplay's clumsy culture clashes do give off an unfortunate aura of seeing the British as a bunch of ingrates who couldn't tie their shoelaces without help from the Yanks that is less than endearing. Sample dialogue: "I don't go for them Limeys. They talk fast, but fight slow." The Home Guard too are singled out for contempt. The very few other British to make it into the film are of the "Cor, luvaduck guv'nor" variety, although, to be fair, even fewer Germans are on view - while not exactly a cheapie, the budget obviously didn't extend to more than five German uniforms.

Despite director Henry Koster's limited visual imagination - if there are three people in any given shot, you can bet he'll line them up left, right and centre without fail - and a total absence of close-ups so prevalent in early widescreen pictures, the old-fashioned CinemaScope is a virtue and one of the chief reasons for buying this: with little in the way of battle scenes and much mushy stuff, this is more one for undemanding romantics and readers of Harlequin romances than the Boys Own brigade.
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