Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by hippo_books
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good: Cover and pages show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Dangerous Dossiers Mass Market Paperback – December 1, 1995

4.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.99
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$6.24 $0.01

Crisis of Character: A White House Secret Service Officer Discloses His Firsthand Experience with Hillary, Bill, and How They Operate by Gary J. Byrne
New In Conservative Outlook
Enjoy a new selection of books in conservative politics. Learn more | See related books
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The FBI, CIA and other government agencies have not only spied on civil rights, peace and leftist-liberal political groups; for decades, as this report documents, the government has been compiling extensive secret files on eminent writers, dramatists, artists and journalists. Mitgang, cultural correspondent for the New York Times, obtained thousands of pages of declassified material under the Freedom of Information Act. Hemingway, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Sandburg, Dreiser, Pearl Buck, Dorothy Parker, Thomas Wolfe, Georgia O'Keeffe, Tennessee Williams, Dashiel Hammettthese, and dozens more people, had dossiers maintained on them by an over-zealous FBI. Federal agents penetrated and spied on the Authors Guild and the Dramatists Guild. Living writers kept under surveillance include John Kenneth Galbraith, Norman Mailer and Allen Ginsberg. Initially excerpted in the New Yorker, Mitgang's damning indictment of government interference with freedom of expression is a blockbuster, an important, brave, chilling expose. 20,000 first printing; BOMC alternate; author tour.
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

YA Mitgang presents an accurate picture of how First Amendment rights have been violated by the investigative arm of our federal government. The FBI, CIA, and other agencies began in the 1920s to keep comprehensive dossiers on public figures, including Ronald Reagan (156 pages were amassed on him as president of the Screen Actor's Guild). These documents were released to Mitgang under the Freedom of Information Act, and he excerpts them here. That the government has heavily deleted some sections is discussed. Mitgang puts the reign of J. Edgar Hoover in historical perspective, and points out that many records, still in files in Washington, can be resurrected at any time. Dangerous Dossiers analyzes the current situation for writers and the fact they are often suspect because of their independent thoughts that appear in print. These revelations explore a new avenue of thought about freedom of expression as well as offering students of American literature new insights into modern authors. Anne Paget, Episcopal High School, Bellaire2
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 348 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (January 26, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1556114850
  • ISBN-13: 978-1556114854
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,904,580 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Luc REYNAERT on October 25, 2004
Herbert Mitgang's courageous book is still very topical.
His exposure of FBI practices of secretly policing authors and their writings shows how intelligence services (and the establishment which controls them) are obsessed with free speech (free trade in ideas).
Writers, playwrights and artists figure here only as examples for those practices. There were surely other victims.

Sometimes, the author's emotions are comprehensively running high with expressions as 'an alien police state' or 'a ... sinister ... level of humiliating absurdities'. But he discovers that even librarians were asked to keep an eye on borrowers and that words like 'culture' or 'freedom' seemed to raise a red flag in the FBI. Nobel Prize winners ought to be watched by Big Brother. Some authors were even hounded to their grave.

The whole book exposes the FBI as a secret government engaged in criminal behaviour composed by an interlocking network of official spies, mercenaries, opportunists and profiteurs.
What is even more astonishing is the fact that in most cases the informants hadn't even read the works of the authors on whom they were spying!

Herbert Mitgang stresses rightly that government files are constitutionally dangerous to the US values of individual independence (the right to be let alone).
Robert Sherwood's quote summarizes perfectly the dilemma:'If our national security is to be rated above the security, the civil liberties, the dignity of every individual American, then our national security is not worth defending'.
This is a most necessary book for the defense of individual freedom.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book discusses the FBI's program of targeting authors as possibly subversive to the USA-- authors such as Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, EB White (Charlotte's Web) and others. It also discusses how the FBI tried pressuring the American Library Assn into maintaining reading lists of its patrons but the Assn refused. Some universities do this and have been doing it. This book a frightening account of an agency with broad police powers and the capability of labelling anyone as an enemy of the state for expressing ideas.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
okay
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse