Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$2.95
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by katiesbookstore
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Shows wear, not pretty but usable. May include varies degrees of markings and highlighting. Cover and corners of book may be worn. Textbooks may not include supplements like CDs, access codes and etc... We stand behind our books with 100% money back guarantee. Fast shipping. Excellent customer service.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

50 Dangerous Things (You Should Let Your Children Do) Paperback – Bargain Price, April 20, 2011

4.2 out of 5 stars 95 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, Bargain Price, April 20, 2011
$6.71 $2.95

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details

Parenting in a complicated world
Strategies to help you be the best parent you can be. See more
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Gever Tulley was fortunate to grow up in a world full of possibilities and adventures. He and his big brother were free to explore their environment and invent their own projects while growing up in the wide-open rural environs of Northern California and interior British Columbia. Their curiosity was encouraged by their parents, who instilled early on a sensible approach to their experiments. Gever's famous rule while babysitting: "If you're going to play with fire, be sure to do it outside." (Note that this was in the ever-wet yards of coastal Northern California, not the tinder-dry inland desert!) In 2005, Gever founded Tinkering School to teach kids how to build things. He created the school since he believes we all learn by fooling around. Grand schemes, wild ideas, crazy notions, and intuitive leaps of imagination are, of course, encouraged and fertilized. After years of creating playful hands-on projects for kids of all ages, Gever wanted to share with a wider audience the discovery that comes from this directed "fooling around." Fifty Dangerous Things (you should let your children do) is his first book on the subject.
Julie Spiegler is a project manager and editor who has collaborated with Tulley on virtually all of his projects.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: NAL Trade; Reprint edition (April 20, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451234197
  • ASIN: B0064X7C8A
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 0.3 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (95 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,529,223 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Deborah L. Nies on January 4, 2010
Format: Paperback
I discovered Gever Tulley on [...] and was fascinated by his speech entitled "5 Dangerous Things you Should let your Children do." Among the list of five things that Mr. Tulley suggested that children should do: play with fire, drive a car and own a pocketknife. Let me say that these suggestions initially tormented this helicopter mom.

Yes, fellow parents, I can feel the cringes now. But, let's think about it. We used to be free-range children. We rode our bicycles without helmets. We played in the neighborhood/woods all day long, only returning home for dinner refueling. We whittled with pocketknives, and yes, most of us probably played with fire. We probably survived these experiences unscathed or with minor scrapes.

The "5 Dangerous Things" lecture was the precursor to his new book which has just been published, and it is called "50 Dangerous Things (you should let your children do)." My tween daughter and I are working our way through this hands-on activity book, which has space for your own field notes.

Mr. Tulley's book promotes learning, and believe it or not, safety. Quote from his website: "There are many "dangerous" things that are interesting, eye-opening, enlightening or just plain fun! And while there are aspects of danger in virtually everything we do, the trick is to learn how mastery actually minimizes danger."

As parents, we need to give our children opportunities to tinker, explore and experiment. We must endeavor to raise the next generation of great thinkers. We already have our copy...where's yours?
Comment 159 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I discovered Gever Tulley on [...] and was fascinated by his speech entitled "5 Dangerous Things you Should let your Children do." Among the list of five things that Mr. Tulley suggested that children should do: play with fire, drive a car and own a pocketknife. Let me say that these suggestions initially tormented this helicopter mom.

Yes, fellow parents, I can feel the cringes now. But, let's think about it. We used to be free-range children. We rode our bicycles without helmets. We played in the neighborhood/woods all day long, only returning home for dinner refueling. We whittled with pocketknives, and yes, most of us probably played with fire. We probably survived these experiences unscathed or with minor scrapes.

The "5 Dangerous Things" lecture was the precursor to his new book which has just been published, and it is called "50 Dangerous Things (you should let your children do)." My tween daughter and I are working our way through this hands-on activity book, which has space for your own field notes. We have already: whittled, thrown a spear, cooked a hot dog in the dishwasher, broke the recipe rules, exploded a bottle in the freezer, and cooked strange things in the microwave. Now THIS is a hands-on book!!

Mr. Tulley's book promotes learning, and believe it or not, safety. Quote from his website: "There are many "dangerous" things that are interesting, eye-opening, enlightening or just plain fun! And while there are aspects of danger in virtually everything we do, the trick is to learn how mastery actually minimizes danger."

As parents, we need to give our children opportunities to tinker, explore and experiment. We must endeavor to raise the next generation of great thinkers. We already have our copy...where's yours? (Pssst, here's a SECRET: It's as much fun for the adults as it is for the kids.)
3 Comments 62 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I'm a parent of young children, so I certainly understand the urge to be protective. Still, sometimes it's more important to know when you're *too* scared of what might happen, and that's when this book comes in very handy indeed. Tulley and Spiegler do an excellent job of balancing caution with excitement; each of the fifty things has enough danger to be interesting, and enough background insight to be intriguing. The lack of sexism is also refreshing; this is a book for *all* kids, boys and girls alike.

All parents who want their kids to develop more confidence and skill in the face of hazardous life situations -- and isn't that *all* parents? -- can benefit from this book. Even if you don't do *any* of the things listed, the overall attitude -- that confidence comes from skill and from knowing and managing risk -- is very helpful and affirming.

I just have to comment on the one-star review here by "L. Helw." I am not sure why that reviewer got so upset at the concept of an activity book such as this, but most of their complaints seem to be addressed at some other book altogether. In particular, Fifty Dangerous Things is very clear that parents and kids should do only the things they find enjoyable, but the one-star reviewer seems to think the book is demanding that all kids do all fifty things. That's only one example of how the one-star review is based on, at best, a very shallow and hasty reading.
Comment 64 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book is absolutely fabulous. It is so important to teach children how to be safe during the adventures you know they will have. The book is cute, clever, thorough and simply wonderful. We couldn't get enough and bought copies for all of our friends with kids! Such a creative and great way to introduce fun stuff for children to explore. Highest recommendations!!!
Comment 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews