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The Dark Knight Rises: Limited Edition Bat Cowl (Blu-ray/DVD Combo+UltraViolet Digital Copy)

4.1 out of 5 stars 4,584 customer reviews

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Digital Copy Notice: The purchase of this DVD or Blu-ray disc comes with rights to access a complimentary digital version from the production company. To access the digital copy, redeem the code included in your product packaging before the expiration date. Learn more

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

It has been eight years since Batman vanished into the night, turning, in that instant, from hero to fugitive. Assuming the blame for the death of D.A. Harvey Dent, the Dark Knight sacrificed everything for what he and Commissioner Gordon both hoped was the greater good. For a time the lie worked, as criminal activity in Gotham City was crushed under the weight of the anti-crime Dent Act. But everything will change with the arrival of a cunning cat burglar with a mysterious agenda. Far more dangerous, however, is the emergence of Bane, a masked terrorist whose ruthless plans for Gotham drive Bruce out of his self-imposed exile. But even if he dons the cape and cowl again, Batman may be no match for Bane.

Review

Of all the "most anticipated" movies ever claiming that title, it's hard to imagine one that has caused so much speculation and breathless expectation as Christopher Nolan's final chapter to his magnificently brooding Batman trilogy, The Dark Knight Rises. Though it may not rise to the level of the mythic grandeur of its predecessor, The Dark Knight Rises is a truly magnificent work of cinematic brilliance that commandingly completes the cycle and is as heavy with literary resonance as it is of-the-moment insight into the political and social affairs unfolding on the world stage. That it is also a full-blown and fully realized epic crime drama packed with state-of-the-art action relying equally on immaculate CGI fakery and heart-stopping practical effects and stunt work makes its entrée into blockbuster history worthy of all the anticipation and more. It deserves all the accolades it will get for bringing an opulently baroque view of a comic book universe to life with sinister effectiveness.

Set eight years after the events of The Dark Knight, TDK Rises finds Bruce Wayne broken in spirit and body from his moral and physical battle with the Joker. Gotham City is at peace primarily because Batman took the fall for Harvey Dent's murder, allowing the former district attorney's memory to remain as a crime-fighting hero rather than the lunatic destructor he became as Two-Face. But that meant Batman's cape and cowl wound up in cold storage--perhaps for good--with only police commissioner Jim Gordon in possession of the truth. The threat that faces Gotham now is by no means new; as deployed by the intricate script that weaves themes first explored in Batman Begins, fundamental conflicts that predate his own origins are at the heart of the ultimate struggle that will leave Batman and his city either triumphant or in ashes. It is one of the movie's greatest achievements that we really don't know which way it will end up until its final exhilarating moments. Intricate may be an understatement in the construction of the script by Nolan and his brother Jonathan. The multilayered story includes a battle for control of Wayne Industries and the decimation of Bruce Wayne's personal wealth; a destructive yet potentially earth-saving clean energy source; a desolate prison colony on the other side of the globe; terrorist attacks against people, property, and the world's economic foundation; the redistribution of wealth to the 99 percent; and a virtuoso jewel thief who is identified in every way except name as Catwoman. Played with saucy fun and sexy danger by Anne Hathaway, Selina Kyle is sort of the catalyst (!) for all the plot threads, especially when she whispers into Bruce's ear at a charity ball some prescient words about a coming storm that will tear Gotham asunder. As unpredictable as it is sometimes hard to follow, the winds of this storm blow in a raft of diverse and extremely compelling new characters (including Selina Kyle) who are all part of a dance that ends with the ballet of a cataclysmic denouement. Among the new faces are Marion Cotillard as a green-energy advocate and Wayne Industries board member and Joseph Gordon-Levitt as a devoted Gotham cop who may lead Nolan into a new comic book franchise. The hulking monster Bane, played by Tom Hardy with powerful confidence even under a clawlike mask, is so much more than a villain (and the toughest match yet for Batman's prowess). Though he ends up being less important to the movie's moral themes and can't really match Heath Ledger's maniacal turn as Joker, his mesmerizing swagger and presence as demonic force personified are an affecting counterpoint to the moral battle that rages within Batman himself. Christian Bale gives his most dynamic performance yet as the tortured hero, and Michael Caine (Alfred), Gary Oldman (Gordon), and Morgan Freeman (Lucius Fox) all return with more gravitas and emotional weight than ever before. Then there's the action. Punctuated by three or four magnificent set pieces, TDKR deftly mixes the cinematic process of providing information with punches of pow throughout (an airplane-to-airplane kidnap/rescue, an institutional terrorist assault and subsequent chase, and the choreographed crippling of an entire city are the above-mentioned highlights). The added impact of the movie's extensive Imax footage ups the wow factor, all of it kinetically controlled by Nolan and his top lieutenants Wally Pfister (cinematography), Hans Zimmer (composer), Lee Smith (editor), and Nathan Crowley and Kevin Kavanaugh (production designers). The best recommendation TDKR carries is that it does not leave one wanting for more. At 164 minutes, there's plenty of nonstop dramatic enthrallment for a single sitting. More important, there's a deep sense of satisfaction that The Dark Knight Rises leaves as the fulfilling conclusion to an absorbing saga that remains relevant, resonant, and above all thoroughly entertaining. --Ted Fry


Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Christian Bale, Anne Hathaway, Tom Hardy, Marion Cotillard, Joseph Gordon-levitt
  • Directors: Christopher Nolan
  • Writers: Christopher Nolan, Jonathan Nolan, David S. Goyer
  • Producers: Christopher Nolan, Emma Thomas, Charles Roven, Benjamin Melniker, Michael E. Uslan
  • Format: NTSC, Widescreen, Multiple Formats, Ultraviolet, Digital_copy
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 3
  • Rated:
    PG-13
    Parents Strongly Cautioned
  • Studio: Warner Brothers
  • DVD Release Date: December 4, 2012
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4,584 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B009K45Y62
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #59,230 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I have been a huge Batman fan since I was a kid. From the comics, to the movies, to the cartoons and the games, but I absolutely loved this series the most. This series really hit the darker side of Batman and gave it a little more of a realistic touch. Batman The Dark Knight Rises, in my opinion, made Bane one of the scariest, most intense villains in any super hero movie I've seen in 2012. I think this movie did a great job ending this specific series, and even still it left me wanting more, but I was very satisfied with the ending. It was intense, fun, and even amusing at times. All around I think its a great movie, a great series and for me it was a definite buy! Hope everyone else can enjoy this movie/series as much as I did.
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Format: DVD
4 Stars. This was pretty damn good but it definitely had its problems. Bane's voice was almost impossible to make out most of the time. The addition of Catwoman was okay but nothing really extraordinary. There was very little screen time for Bale which he probably wasn't happy about so this really came off more like 'Bane and Robin' rather than 'Batman and Robin'. The biggest problem though is the first act.

It really drags and they could have lost about 10 or 15 minutes to tighten up the pace. Once the second act kicks in though, that's when the whole story becomes really engaging. It's awesome how Bane unintentionally 'recreates' Batman without knowing it. There is definitely some repetition of ideas from the first two which is probably why this is the last one but overall it is probably the darkest of the three. This is definitely better than the latest Spiderman.

The criticism about this third chapter not fitting in with the whole series could not be further from the truth. This one really represents the bookending of the entire series. In the first chapter Batman does NOT exist until he escapes from the League of Shadows and the same is true when he escapes from the prison in this one. The great irony of both these movies is that the antagonist in each case actually creates Batman, the only person that can stop them. This is why the first fight with Bane is dismal. It is not because of a lack of physical conditioning, it is because this is not Batman fighting Bane but Bane fighting Bruce Wayne doing the best he can. So in reality it is the second chapter that does 'fit' because Batman already exists from start to finish.

This is really the genius of Nolan in full effect.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Christopher Nolan immerses you into the comic book. This is a monumental conclusion to the epic trilogy which has transformed the Batman character from the Tim Burton series of the 90's which all enjoyed. Nolan in his three films brings the story and technical aspect to a much higher level.

I have not viewed this film since my big screen viewing 18 months ago and after have compared it to the Burton films. I noticed an impressively stark contrast to the upside in this film. Watching the Blue Ray version in our home theater was just as impressive and allowed for an appreciation of brilliant and amazing film making.

The Blue Ray Package is in a three disc format. It employs the Blue Ray disc, DVD disc, and a bonus feature disc. The latter was worth the price of the package. Additionally, this package has the Ultraviolet Bonus and App for providing digital collection and exclusive content respectively. I do not know how anyone out does this great film.
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Format: Blu-ray
Having been a huge fan of Chris Nolan's previous two Batman films, couldn't wait to watch this when it was released. And The Dark Knight Rises didn't disappoint. The conclusion to the trilogy is fitting for the franchise, for Batman, and for Bruce Wayne (though I have read rumors that Nolan might come back for another film in the series or maybe a Batman/Superman film - hope some of this is true!).

The film starts with a frail Bruce Wayne having pretty much retired and living a private life eight years after he eliminated the Joker. The peaceful Gotham City where police officers feel they will soon be "chasing overdue library books" is rocked by a series of events orchestrated by the ferocious and calculating villain, Bane.

The pace of this film is slightly slower (and heavier) compared to the previous two films, partly because there are a lot more characters in this film, and Nolan being the master storyteller that he is, gives each character enough time in the film. It could seem a bit lengthy at 3 hours of thereabout because of this. Lucius Fox and Alfred return in their usual roles of being Batman's brains and soul respectively. Michael Caine's performance as Alfred is simply remarkable even though his screen time is somewhat limited in the film. Christian Bale, as usual, has done a great job portraying the battles within Bruce Wayne - overcoming his hears and rising from being as good as dead to come back to save his beloved city. His character comes a full circle from the first film as Thomas Wayne's words "why do we fall down Bruce" echo through this film and Bruce seemingly understands their meaning here as he prepares to pick himself up and "rise".

New characters added a refreshing touch to the series. Anne Hathaway is brilliant in her role as Selina Kyle.
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