Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Dark Trade: Lost in Boxing (Mainstream Sport) Paperback – August 5, 2005

4.8 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$44.86 $0.94

Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

Donald McRae’s newly updated Dark Trade remains a classic of sports writing—a vividly personal journey through the highly charged world of the professional fight game.


“Donald McRae, in thrall to a 30-year boxing addiction, has seen countless fights both minor and major in England and the United States, and is on friendly, even intimate, terms with a number of boxers and their associates. Dark Trade bears comparison with Thomas Hauser’s The Black Lights…but Dark Trade is more picaresque in form, taking the reader ringside in vividly rendered, and in several cases graphically brutal, matches…McRae brings to the highly charged, obsessive world of professional boxing a novelist’s eye and ear for revealing detail and convincingly recalled dialogue…Engaging, sympathetically rendered, emotionally direct…This is an impassioned book.”  —Joyce Carol Oates, Los Angeles Times

About the Author

Donald McRae is also the author of Winter Colours: Changing Seasons in World Rugby and Nothing Personal: The Business of Sex.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Mainstream Sport
  • Paperback: 395 pages
  • Publisher: Mainstream Publishing (April 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1840189568
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840189568
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.2 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,490 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book outlines so many fighters from the past it is impossible to get into much detail other than to say , it was fun and very detailed reading.

After all of my years as a fight fan I had many questions answered about my boxers, trainers, corrupt people and groups in the sport and more.

I found it a long read because it does go into unusual detail on all of the above subjects unlike most books that just seem to want to skim over a subject. so they can fill more pages with skimpy information

The writer did a great job with a obvious tremendous amount of research .......
Thanks
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I probably should have written a review of this book years ago. Dark Trade was my introduction to the idea that writing about the sport of boxing could be serious literature. I was writing about the sport at the time and in Donald McRae, I found a good example of what I wanted to emulate. His brief pugilistic memoirs absorb the reader into a world where seedy contracts and menacing intentions are held at bay by the humanity gleaming in each fighters eyes. His star struck meeting with Sugar Ray Leonard, his odd encounters with the ambiguous Mike Tyson and his awkward descriptions of the charisma of Nigel Benn are all to be held with the highest regard.

Only two years after reading Dark Trade I strived to reach that same depth when I wrote my first boxing novel 'Virgin Gloves'. Had I reached my goal and brought insight to the sport I loved? Well, one day I got an e-mail from Donald McRae and he gave me by far the best endorsement possible. I thank him for that glorious moment in my writing career and I thank him for writing this fantastic book.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
A nicely written account of the author's personal journey through boxing in the 90s. The author vividly describes his encounters with some of the big names in the sport: Oscar De La Hoya, Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Roy Jones, Jr. and especially, James Toney. What's interesting about these sections of the book is that McRae really seems to get to know the people he's writing about and is able to reveal sides of their characters that aren't normally seen. I read this over a weekend, neglecting everything else I had planned to do because I couldn't put it down.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I don't want to take up too much time with too many words, but this book was FANTASTIC!

This book is not about boxing techniques and such, but about the worldwide appeal, intense admiration, strong ambitions and profound discipline, that the participants and spectators of 'the noble art' are lured to. Donald McRae has done an excellent job.

Both the gladiator-type fighters and the promoters alike are examined unflinchingly. Some are well known and others not so much, but none of them are any less significant to the 'dark trade'.

The background stories on the medical history of the sport, with regards to ringside physicians and those who paid with their lives, is addressed in this book and made for very compelling reading.

'Dark Trade' gives insight into the lives and backgrounds of the author and some very famous fighters; like Nigel Benn, Oscar de la Hoya, Chris Eubanks, Prince Naseem Hamed, James Toney and Mike Tyson. But imo, the even greater appeal, were the stories told about some lesser lights of the fight game, like Jimmy Garcia, Gerald McClellan and Michael Watson.

I don't want to spoil it for anyone who is thinking of reading this book, but I will say this -- just like boxing itself, it's absolutely fascinating; with great highs and lows that will engage your heart!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is about a man's obsession with boxing; an obsession that has consumed him since his early life in a township in South Africa all the way to Las Vegas while sitting in the dressing room as a guest of a world champion before a title fight.

McRae admits he is obsessed with boxing often in spite of his own better judgment. His love of the Sweet Science is undiminished by the ubiquitous and noxious corruption which has sapped boxing's credibility since its inception. He justifies his passion by sharing it with his wife but candidly asks: in how many other sports are its writers continually compelled to question their sport's health?

The detail in this book is marvelous. He gives particular insight on the lives of James Toney, Roy Jones, Prince Naseem Hamed, Chris Eubank and Mike Tyson. His personal relationships with these fighters and his unique access into their lives, Toney in particular, unearth a compelling voyeurism in the reader that makes this book very difficult to put down. Toney, a talented and once feared fighter, is revealed as a flawed and delusional boxer. The detail McRae gives about "Lights Out" Toney, while not excusing the boxer's behavior, certainly paints a fuller more human picture of his complicated and melancholy life story. Toney's relationship with his mother and his manager is the kind of unusual quirky story McRae implores you to expect from this tumultuous sport populated by working class athletes who often had no choice other than to fight in order to make a life for themselves.

A good read for casual boxing enthusiasts and a MUST-read for boxing geeks.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?