Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$1.61
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by AZ_Fulfillment
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: [Solid Condition Hardcover. Cover may have wear and possible small tears. May contain writing/markings. May be ex-library copy. Any CD/DVD may have been removed by previous user. Expedited Shipping Available]
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Darwin Myth: The Life and Lies of Charles Darwin Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
$11.79 $1.59
Paperback
"Please retry"

Wiley Summer Savings Event.
Wiley Summer Savings Event.
Save up to 40% during Wiley's Summer Savings Event. Learn more.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Regnery Publishing
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0058M8FHA
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,740,558 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Of course you will not hear about the "father of modern evolutionary thought" save the briefest encomium - and this book explains why. Wiker is more sympathetic than I'd have been; still, the results are damning. Lector intelligat...
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Biographies of Darwin tend to either demonize the man or present him as a secular saint. Benjamin Wiker, a Catholic theologian and member of the Discovery Institute, tries to present in this slim volume a biography of Darwin that at once affirms the man while at the same time criticizes the theory. It is an admirable attempt, but in the final analysis it falls a little short. Nonetheless, the book is by no means as hostile to Darwin as the subtitle implies.

Darwin the man was much as he portrayed himself to be: humble, caring, a devoted father, and a devout Whig with liberal political sympathies. Unwilling to live as a wealthy gentleman, unable to work as a doctor, and ultimately bored by the prospect of becoming a clergyman, Darwin "found" himself as a naturalist. One of the many little "lies" that he told in his autobiography was that he was hired as a naturalist for his famous voyage on the Beagle: in fact he was a gentleman companion on the trip, but such stretching of the truth is common in an autobiography. It is certainly true that Darwin was a celebrated scientist by the end of the trip, thanks in no small part to his natural theology teachers John Henslow and Adam Sedgwick.

But Darwin did promote one myth about himself that this little biography correctly notes. His famous theory was not a result of a careful examination of the scientific evidence. Rather, the theory came before the facts, and Darwin's argument for "natural" selection was a deliberate attempt to exclude the divine from the natural world altogether. Of course, the whig theory of history now paints Darwin as the sober scientist, and his opponents like Wilberforce as committed defenders of biblical inerrancy, but this simplified view of history is only held by protagonists in a cultural debate.
Read more ›
72 Comments 99 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The book's underlying argument: because science prescribes to methodological naturalism, Darwin, by following this methodology, proposed the theory of natural selection thereby leaving God out. "That evolution must be godless to be scientific is the Darwin Myth, so profoundly misleading that it must be called a great lie,..." (pxi) According to the author then, this myth has supposedly distorted our understanding of the scientific evidence and the debates surrounding evolution (but not any scientific debates). So the author's core complaint here is with methodological naturalism generally, and Darwin's adherence to it in formulating the theory of natural selection.

Simply stated, methodological naturalism mandates that hypotheses or the causes behind phenomena are to be explained using only natural processes. Supernatural or theistic explanations are not admitted at the outset. It's not that scientists don't believe there is a God; it's just that introducing 'Him' into the explanatory process is irrelevant. The reason for this is that methodological naturalism has been enormously successful in providing explanations, in furthering research and in providing practical engineering applications for example. Science, per definitionem *is* methodological naturalism.

Even though science arose out of disciplines more mystical in nature (as in alchemy becoming chemistry for instance), the superstitious side sent countless individuals down nonproductive alleys and dead ends. Supernatural explanations (if there is such a thing) are unproductive. They really don't explain anything. In spite of there always being some things currently deemed supernatural or inexplicable, they may or may not be explained in the future as some unusual natural phenomena.
Read more ›
41 Comments 104 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
An in-depth look at this man, for certain. I learned a lot as a Christian. His views do not track with mine but I saw a side of him that I was not aware of. He wasn't the monster some people have portrayed him to be but his theory of the origin of species continues to be challenged as it was during his lifetime, even by some of his contemporaries. A must read for those who want to know more about this interesting man and his controversial theories.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Despite the title, I thought the book really balanced. It is written by an evolutionist whose goal is to not discredit Darwin's theory, but just to give an accurate biography of the man. Because Darwin is the secular saint, Wiker did not really feel there was much out there that was objective. So he attempts to show Darwin's strengths and weaknesses and complexities. What was most interesting to me was how Charles Darwin's grandfather enthusiastically believed in evolution and Charles came from a family line of secularist, so Darwin went out looking for evidence to prove what He assumed before hand was true, it was not like he stumped upon the facts which were so overwhelming that he gave in, lost his faith and surrendered to the truth of science. All of this fits with my notion of the power of presuppositions, Darwin wanted the theory to be true, it had to be true, and this colors his perception of things. Those after him have come from the standpoint that it has to be true, for there is no alternatives, they are committed to it with a religious zeal and devotion, which makes them as acceptable to BS as religious people are. Like Bill Bryson wrote that (I am paraphrasing) "we typically don't think you can get something from nothing, but since there was nothing, and now we have a universe, we have proof that it can happen" and Quinton Smith wrote "the most reasonable thing to believe is that everything came from nothing, by nothing and for nothing" and this kind of nonsense (I say nonsense, in that it is non-sense, something beyond our senses) is embraced by scientist, who don't seem to even pause to reflect how unscientific such a conclusion is. But since it HAD to happen that way, well, it happened.Read more ›
1 Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: science books