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David Moffett & Ornette-Paris 1966

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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(Oct 19, 2004)
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Editorial Reviews

Double feature featuring two of the most interesting films ever made about modern experimental jazz. Ornette Coleman Trio featuring David Izenzon & Charles Moffett plus Sound featuring Roland Kirk & John Cage. B&W - hi-fi stereo. 55 min. All regions/Pal & NTSC. Rhapsody Films/Efor Films.

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Format: Color, Import, PAL
  • Language: English (Mono)
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: Rhapsody Films
  • DVD Release Date: October 19, 2004
  • Run Time: 55 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0002SLYMS
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #349,354 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Stylistically speaking, this is a festival of modernity: two short musical films by Dick Fontaine - "David, Moffet & Ornette" from 1966. and "Sound??" from 1967 uses some modernist cinematic techniques (rambling hand-held camera, unpredictable editing...) to depict quite extraordinary phenomena...

The first film shows us Ornette Coleman's multiinstrumentalist trio (with David Izenson on bass and Charles Moffet on drums and percussions...); they're working on a soundtrack and discuss their lives and music.
The second film alternates between Roland Kirk's wild explorations in the richness of sound with John Cage's poetic musings on the nature of sound and the music in general/plus some glimpses of Cage at his musical work...
While Cage alone would seem pompous (at least to me), seeing Kirk interact with his audience (or children and ZOO animals) really gives deep truthfulness to Cage's lyrical philosophy...

Musically speaking, Coleman's group gives more modern (free jazz) performance, while Kirk, juggling with incredible number of instruments, is more deeply rooted in the blues and mainstream/swing/bop tradition, but their music is complementary as it is different... They just explore the possibilities of sound in various directions.

If you like modern jazz (or John Cage) you'll certainly like this DVD.
My first complaint is that the cover shows Coleman much older than he is in the film, which might confuse some buyers (I was well informed before purchasing this).
My second complaint is that there is no booklet inside the box; there's so much to write about this material...

BTW
Both films are in black and white; both are between 20 and 25 minutes long.
Also; Kirk was filmed at Ronnie Scott's club.
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Format: DVD
This is a DVD which contains two short avant-garde films made by Dick Fontaine in 1966 and 1967. Together they make 55 minutes. I have not purchased the DVD, so I cannot comment on the quality of the disc itself, but I have seen "Sound??" (1967) which features John Cage (narrating) and Roland Kirk (playing music and exploring sound.) It's a nice piece which encourages keeping an open mind towards new, different, evolving, eccentric, avant-garde music and the exploration of sound. Cage questions what "sound" stands for and whether simply "sound" is music or not. I recommend this film to open minded listeners and to musicians who are into other things than practicing rudiments and scales to a metronome 10 hrs/day. Unfortunately I have not seen the 29 minute long "Ornette Coleman Trio" yet, but know that it was made in 1966 and features the Ornette Coleman Trio with David Izenson and Charles Moffett recording the soundtrack of "Who's Crazy" in Paris.
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Format: DVD
This is nothing but a masterpiece of music and images. The first film, with Ornette's trio, shows the group recording the soundtrack of an unknown european film. The camera movement and the edition are incredible, as it is Ornette's words. The second one, with Roland Kirk and John Cage, is even more interesting, because it deals with different moments of Kirk's playing (in a concert, in a zoo! etc.) alternating takes with Cage's conceptual claims about music. A magnum-opus of music, cinema and - what is more important - art.
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