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A Day of Light and Shadows: One Die-Hard Red Sox Fan and His Game of a Lifetime: The Boston-New York Playoff, 1978 Hardcover – September 1, 2003

3.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"This wonderful book is diminutive, but its emotion for baseball fans is as weighty as the OED."
--Tim McCarver, N.Y. Yankees broadcaster


"He's a writer with a distinctive voice,
Whose pitch is perfect, whose taste is choice.
A smart, creative, insightful man,
With one tragic flaw: he's a Red Sox fan."
--Charles Osgood

From the Back Cover

DESTINY 5 - RED SOX 4 declared one Boston headline after Bucky Dent's unlikely home run had cost the Red Sox the dramatic 1978 playoff game at Fenway Park against the Yankees for the Eastern Division title of the American League. No one has commented more eloquently and openly on destiny's victories over the Sox and their devoted fans through the years than writer and New York radio personality Jonathan Schwartz, who left his heart in Fenway at an early age. Schwartz's stirring and unusually intimate account of the beauty and heartbreak of that resplendent day in '78 appeared in Sports Illustrated in 1979. On the 25th anniversary of "the Dent game," Schwartz's memoir is now issued with an autobiographical essay in which the author reflects on the Sox, his life, and destiny's various line-ups in the decades since Dent.
With a forward by Boston Globe sports columnist Bob Ryan.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 64 pages
  • Publisher: The Lyons Press; 1st edition (September 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592280633
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592280636
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.2 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,817,703 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Jonathan Schwartz captures the sweet sadness of being a lifelong Red Sox fan (at least until 2004).
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This very, very, short story, actually less than 44 tiny pages, drew no empathetic feelings from me. It apparently was written for a tiny audience of people who can not form stable relationships with people as well as they do with a sports team. I know many sports fanatics that are still able to live life without putting so much importance on their team. Schwartz admits to literally running away from his responsibilities in abject grief over his team losing a game. He admits to spending over $15,000.00 on a long distance feed to his telephone so he can hear his favorite announcers. Top that with all the name dropping and other adolescence quirks and I just could not empathize with him.
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