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Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the library of" labels.
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In the Days of Victorio; Recollections of a Warm Springs Apache Paperback – November 1, 1972

4.9 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

  • In the Days of Victorio; Recollections of a Warm Springs Apache
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  • Indeh: An Apache Odyssey, with New Maps
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  • Apache Voices: Their Stories of Survival as Told to Eve Ball
Total price: $64.90
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Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

"Chief Victorio of the Warm Springs Apache, has recounted the turbulent life of his people between 1876 and 1886. This eyewitness account . . . recalls not only the hunger, pursuit, and strife of those years, but also the thoughts, feelings, and culture of the hunted tribe. Recommended as general reading." --"Library Journal"
"This volume contains a great deal of interesting information." --"Journal of the West"
"The Apache point of view presented with great clarity." --"Books of the Southwest"
"A valuable addition to the southwestern frontier shelf and long will be drawn upon and used." --"Journal of Arizona History"

About the Author

Eve Ball held bachelors and master's degree and an honorary doctorate from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Along-time resident of Ruidoso, on the edge of the Mescalero Apache reservation in southern New Mexico, she conducted her interviews and her research among the Apaches over three decades. Nora Henn and Lynda A. Sanchez, friends who help Ball prepare her manuscript, have since pursued Indian studies and the history of Lincoln County, New Mexico.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press; (1st,1970); Second Printing edition (November 1, 1972)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816504016
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816504015
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #222,015 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Dale C. Miles on June 25, 2008
Format: Paperback
Dale C. Miles, San Carlos tribal historian

As an Apache I would like to say that I read the review about James Kaywaykla's SELECTIVE ASPECTS on Apache history and culture and was more amused than anything else. Since I've had to deal with non-tribal people for most of my life (I was born on the San Carlos tribal area and have lived in Arizona all my life)I have found that correcting white folks' misconceptions about us Apaches has been nearly a full time job (Example: Do you people pay taxes? I just say: "I wish I didn't have to.") still as an historin I have to be objective and I realize that Apaches in war could be pretty rough. Still, knowing that I still have to deal with prejuidice in nearby towns tells that in the ole' West things were even worse. The point is this, Eve Ball wrote reason for writing the is fine book on Victorio's people was for non-tribal people to see the Apaches as human beings and in this she succeeded very well. An objective reader will see Kaywaykla and his people as such. For instance, you will find that many did not want to live a life of constant warfare and refused to go out with Geronimo in the spring of 1885--they were sent to prison in Florida anyway just because they were Chiricahua and the army couldn't catch the hostile ones. Also in the passage where where his beloved step father is sent to prison one can see the pain, hurt and loss that a child can feel at such an incident. The book shows how important family was (and still is) to the Apaches. In this book Juh (pronounced Whoa), Loco and Geronimo come alive and we see the lengendary Apache woman warrior lozen, is profiled as well. I give this book five stars because as an Apache I understand where the narrantor is coming from; any open minded person would as well.
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Format: Paperback
As an apache woman, this is one book I would highly recommend. Not only does it tell of what The Warm Springs Apache had to endure, but of what they felt and of the internal conflicts amonst the apache people. In this book not only do they focus on Chief Victorio but all that surrounded him.
I recommend all to read this book and see what it was like from the Apache point of veiw.
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By S. Clark on December 16, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Best book I ever read about the Indian experience. Eve Ball's, "Indeh", is good too, but two thirds of that book are devoted to the grueling imprisonment and immiseration of the Apache after they were pacified. Thankfully, this book glosses over that.

This book is so dense and packed with drama and incident it was slow to read. The terrible feeling of being hunted was hard to bear. I took every killing and massacre personally. I identify with the Apache so much. I have, ever since I read a book about Geronimo when I was 12. His real name was Goyahkla, by the way. Indians don't give their children Spanish names.

Eve Ball is such a wonderful person. She took such extraordinary and painstaking care to compile these accounts and to cross check them with other sources.
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By A Customer on November 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
Anyone interested in the Apache and the history of the American Southwest needs to read this book. You will likely consider the events and participants of this controversial period of history in a new light when you hear the "other side of the story" from one who was there. I wouldn't be surprised if you measure all other accounts of the "Apache Wars" period against Mr. Kaywaykla's testimony.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I heard about this author on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Podcast. Eve Ball is one of the few who has been able to capture and share the point of view of the Apache during one of America's least known wars. The book isn't heavily loaded with propaganda or anything like that, but is about how several Apache lived their lives. One of the segments that made the largest impact on me was hearing about how children were trained to keep a food pouch tied to them while they slept and if they were attacked at night they grabbed the pouch and their blanket and headed to a rendevaous point to wait for their guardians; parents often fought the invaders and defended the escape routes. Apocalypse stories and movies are incredibly popular right now, they explore how we'd change if things weren't as safe and protected. Well, this story shares not what it might be like, but what it was actually like for a real group of people.
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Bought this book for my husband who is a history buff. He's loves it !!!
He likes that it is factual and comes from interviews with Victorio. He can't
put it down, says he learned many things he had never heard before.
He's happy and I'm happy that I bought it for him.
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Ball writes her questions and gives the response of the Apache answerer. In many cases, the answerer was telling their own personal observations because they were actually there, and these were very vivid descriptions of the events that happened. Such details of daily survival are very enlightening, giving insights into Apache beliefs and traditions, as well as their motivations. Most of the recollections are those of Kaywaykla, grandson of Nana, and gives details about Nana, Kaytennae, Geronimo, Juh, Chihuahua, Lozen, and other Apaches, in addition to Victorio. Occasionally Ball includes recollections of other Apaches that supported those of Kaywaykla.

Ball also includes footnotes referring the reader to perspectives of various white observers, especially where historical records differ from the Apache side. My only complaint is where these footnotes contained more than mere book, author, or page references and were included at the back of the book. I wish that the additional verbiage had been included at the bottom of the page so that my reading wasn't disrupted by going to the back of the book to see what the reference was about.
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