Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$3.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by CWJBOOKS
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Exlibrary hardcover in dust jacket- light reader wear Has all the usual library marks, stickers, and stamps.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Dead Meat Hardcover – June, 1994

3.6 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$8.48 $0.01

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
Available from these sellers.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Kerr's most recent novel, A Philosophical Investigation , takes place in England in the near future, while his three-volume Bernhard Gunther series, begun with March Violets , is set in 1930s Berlin. Here he turns to modern-day Russia to trace an electrifying battle between the anemically funded Russian police and well-heeled ethnic Mafiosi who operate at will in post-Soviet St. Petersburg. An anonymous narrator--an Internal Affairs-type lawyer--monitors detective Yevgeni Ivanovich Grushko's efforts to nail mob thugs for the murder of an investigative journalist who had aired Mafia laundry and government scandal on TV. Grushko rousts the Ukrainian and Chechen mobsters, who rival the Georgians in the proliferation of scams, protection rackets and black-market action marking Russia's emerging private-sector economy. Struggling to investigate amid such impediments as red tape, public distrust of police, KGB rivalry, low police morale and minimal resources, Grushko even appeals for leads on a Geraldo Rivera-like show. While the detective inches toward a resolution connecting the Chernobyl disaster, the mob and a British-backed Russian capitalist venture, the narrator falls for the journalist's sexy widow and learns hard lessons from Grushko about fighting for justice in an unhinged society. In Kerr's literate dark novel, strains of romantic balalaika music blend with the sound of the sharp wind sweeping across the steppes. Readers will hope for more appearances of this new man from Moscow.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Mikhail Milyukin, Russia's first investigative journalist, is found executed Mafia-style. Finding his killers and the reason for the murder falls to relentless militia officer Yevgeni Grushko. This novel works both as a gritty cop novel in a unique setting and as a lens on a troubled and tragic country. Kerr really did his homework; he secured the cooperation of the St. Petersburg militia's organized crime unit, rode with its officers, and took part in several operations against the Mafia. His research gives the book special weight, for example, in his explanations of the ethnic foundations of Russia's gangs. The language of cops and thugs alike has a wonderfully quirky but authentic sound; strikes against the Mafia are "realisations." Equally important, however, Kerr lived with the incredible privations that nearly all Russians endure. His illumination of those hardships in the lives of his characters is almost painful at times, and the startling crime uncovered by Grushko has a terrible plausibility in grim contemporary Russia. Thomas Gaughan
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 239 pages
  • Publisher: Mysterious Pr; First Edition edition (June 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0892965622
  • ISBN-13: 978-0892965625
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #798,510 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Phillip Kerr is starting to look like the Robert DeNiro
of writing. In his previous book, he immersed himself in
every possible detail of pre- and post-war Germany, with his
mysteries unfolding within the thread of Nazism. Now, in
Dead Meat, he dissects post-Soviet Russia, with the optimism,
fatalism and corruption that riddle the society. Kerr has
captured the Russian psyche perfectly, while winding the plot
around the killing of a crusading journalist. How does a Brit
learn so much about what hides within the heart of today's
Russia?

I recommend this book for both the mystery and the sociology
behind it.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Similar to another review here: if you like Martin Cruz-Smith's Renko novels, you'll like this. The writing and the black post-Soviet humor shouldn't be missed. Right behind Berlin Noir: March Violets; The Pale Criminal; A German Requiem as far as the Kerr books that I've read.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Kerr has written a provocative post-communist book that truthfully factors in the destructiveness of 70 years of Red Rule and the destitution of a super-power. He has captured the nuance of Russian Slang and the private language used in the criminal/police world. Lastly, the twists and turns of the plot are all plausible while at the same time comical for their surreal and absurd situations.

Unfortunately, Kerr has never touched this subject or characters again. If you love this book, and you will, "Wolves Eat Dogs" by Martin Cruz Smith, is a great companion novel.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This was a great book. The lead character is just as authentic and engaging as Bernie Gunther, but Kerr succeeded in creating a fresh character, not just a Russian version of Bernie. I read this thing in 2 days. I would have given it a 5, but I try to reserve those for stories that are somehow mindblowing. Still, a very good book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Philip Kerr writes a great detective novel. In "Red Meat", Kerr weaves an interesting yarn of modern day Russia with all the intrigue of the new Russian Mafia. Kerr has obviously done his homework on current conditions in Russia, particularly St. Petersuburg (Lenningrad) and is very accurate in his description of the city and region. If you like detective stories set in Eastern-Europe/Russia along the lines of Martin Cruz-Smith's "Gorky Park" series, you'll love "Red Meat". I hope he writes many more novels of this genre set in the Commonwealth of Independent States
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse