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Death Of A Bachelor

January 15, 2016 | Format: MP3

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$9.49 to buy
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Product Details

Customer Reviews

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Format: MP3 Music
I will start off by disclosing that I have been a very big fan of Panic! at the Disco, since I was at the age where we all denied it (circa 2008). That being said, I only recently started listening to the newer albums and came in with a very open mind.

This is a pretty big tangent from what we've come to expect from Panic (or more accurately Brendon Urie). The music is catchy and some songs will haunt you until you fall asleep. He wont on record saying he hoped to channel Queen and Frank Sinatra in this album, which is a major ambition. I don't believe he necessarily hit a level that we would expect out of Sinatra or Freddie Mercury but this album shows a pretty serious feat as an artist. Urie performed all instruments included vocals with the exception of the horns and you can feel the passion he put into all the music.

While he doesn't have a voice like Sinatra, he does a hell of a job emulating the jazzy feel of the old Sinatra music. The big band feel of this album is not something we've necessarily seen from Panic in the past, but underneath it all is still the core electronic pop-punk that Panic fans have all come to love.

Long story short, Panic fans will most likely love this album, especially songs like "Hallelujah" and "Victorious" while perhaps Urie can even turn non-fans on with the jazzy vocals in "Death of a Bachelor".
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Format: Audio CD
Excellent. Flawless. 10/10. Brendon Urie is a one man show and the music stays amazing. Fight me on this, his bandmates left and he got BETTER.
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Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
This review is part for the album itself, and part the vinyl itself.
Firstly, I've been a Panic! fan for a fairly long time - I started listening to them right before Vices and Virtues came out as their spiritual brother, Fall Out Boy, had been taking an extended hiatus. I loved their first, A Fever You Can't Sweat Out, finding it not to only be a damn good album but a novel concept as it blended electronic dance music with a sort of vaudevillian/ballroom sound, divided into two separate sections. They were different enough from the band that got them started, but if you liked FOB, you were bound to like Panic!. I adored Pretty Odd, and it remains to this day one of my favorite albums of all time - a perfect blend of original sound and tribute to the likes of The Beatles and The Beach Boys, but also a sign of what this band was going to become - a fluid, ever changing chameleon of sound. This is the anthology series of music, with each album featuring a different sound, genre, and frequently - a different lineup. Each told a different story, and I loved it.
But there was a hiccup after their second album - half of the band jumped ship. The guitarist, and the bassist/secondary lead singer left after running into some creative differences, and the Panic! we all grew to love was suddenly broken. Being fans, though, most of us got through it, knowing that change was something you had to deal with in this band, and their third album was also a treat, as was the 80's dark electronic inspired Too Weird to Live, Too Rare to Die.
They were different, from the sounds to the people, but they were indisputably Panic! At The Disco
This is "Panic! At The Disco"'s fifth album, and for the first time I find it hard to call it that, because this ISN'T Panic! At The Disco...
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Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
You can hear the Frank Sinatra influence in this album, and it's a strange mash up to consider given the modern tones, but Brendan Urie does it so well. There's a song for every occasion here, so sit back and get ready for the earworms.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
With each new album, Panic! at the Disco has managed to progress their sound in interesting directions, and I've found myself enchanted by all of them. Where some works have a fairly clear pattern--"Pretty. Odd" was a Beatles-esque feel from end to end--I'd have to say "Death of a Bachelor" is all over the map. We have knockout pop hooks like "Victorious", an off-the-rails song of excess ("Don't Threaten Me With a Good Time") accented brilliantly with B-52s riffs, and the wild Swing sounds of "Crazy=Genius" just to name a few...but more to the point, it seems like with every album, lead singer Brendan Urie is determined to stretch himself vocally. "Emperor's New Groove" hits some shocking high notes--then goes higher--"Golden Days" is belted out with intensity, and then we have two numbers that may not resonate with everyone, but are stylistically perfect: the title song "Death of a Bachelor" and "Impossible Year" are crooned out Lounge-style, emulating Sinatra. In between the extremes are some fairly familiar sounds, with "Hallelujah" and "The Good, The Bad, and the Dirty" comfortably sticking to Panic! at the Disco's core sound, and the smooth harmonies (and burgeoning cynicism) of "LA Devotee" also right at home.

If you're already a fan of "Panic! at the Disco" think of this as having some of the lyrical darkness of "Vices & Virtues", the tongue-in-cheek whimsy of "A Fever You Can't Sweat Out", and infectious vocals of "Too Weird to Live, Too Rare to Die!". "Death of a Bachelor" is an excellent new entry in Panic! at the Disco's Catalogue, and I can't wait to see where they go from here.
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