Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Death in the Devil's Acre Mass Market Paperback – April 12, 1987

4.5 out of 5 stars 68 customer reviews

See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.50 $0.01

Featured in Mystery,Thriller & Suspense
A Great Reckoning: A Novel (Chief Inspector Gamache Novel)
A Great Reckoning: A Novel (Chief Inspector Gamache Novel)
A Great Reckoning: A Novel (Chief Inspector Gamache Novel)
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Perry’s Victorian novels attain the societal sweep of Trollope or Thackeray.”—Booklist, starred review
 
 
“For readers longing to be in 1890s London, Perry’s tales are just the ticket.”—Chicago Tribune

 
“An exquisitely detailed addition to Perry’s outstanding series!”—Library Journal



From the Trade Paperback edition.

From the Inside Flap

"Give her a good murder and a shameful social evil, and Anne Perry can write a Victorian mystery that would make Dickens's eyes pop."
NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW
When a doctor is found brutally murdered, even the neighborhood's most hardened residents are stunned. But three more bodies are found, killed the same inexpert way, and Inspector Thomas Pitt and his wife Charlotte race against time to find the killer, as a treacherous mystery unfolds. No one, not the lowest brand of ruffian or the most established aristocrat, will come out unscathed....
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Fawcett; Reprint edition (April 12, 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0449210952
  • ISBN-13: 978-0449210956
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.7 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,618,424 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Death in the Devil's Acre is the seventh book in Anne Perry's Thomas and Charlotte Pitt historical mystery series is an intoxicating thriller from start to finish with mesmerizing characters.

A doctor of good standing and impeccable character is found slashed to death in the Devil's Acre, one of Victorian London's slums near the docks. Then another body is found with the same "calling card." A serial killer?

Pitt is called on to investigate. Recurring characters figure prominently in this mystery, especially Charlotte, helping Pitt with his investigation, but the crimes are not solved until the final pages after a particularly exciting chase involving some of Perry's most riveting characters.

Another unputdownable Perry mystery, one that satisfies the lover of historical mysteries with period detail and, in particular, facts about the poverty and suffering of children in this rigid and hypocritical society.

I admit to the book's being one of my favorites in the Pitt series, and, I believe, with it, Ms. Perry's mastery of the genre comes into its own. What sets it above the earlier novels, I think, is the fascinating character development of the antagonist and other minor villains.

However, since a review is supposed to focus objectively on what historical readers would like--given character development, intricacy of plot, accuracy of historic detail, and the requisite number of suspects, clues, and red herrings, its solution logically formed without an undue stretch of circumstance--I need to give it a four-star rating. It is a novel I re-read from time to time, and also listen to Davina Porter's wonderful unabridged reading of the story. It would be 4.5, if we were allowed half sizes.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In this seventh novel in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt high Victorian mystery series, we leave the exclusive circles of high London society for the brothels and slums, where first a seemingly respectable doctor and then Max, the blackmailing footman from CALLANDER SQUARE, are not only murdered but mutilated -- and then a third murder brings into play Charlotte's connections with London's drawing room society. Perry does a good job in this one, especially in delineating the characters of those whose existence middle class London would rather know about.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
I never put spoilers in my reviews.
Anne Perry is a master of the written word. Every word, phrase, paragraph is placed for maximum effect. There is no filler or waste. She has obviously researched the era exhaustively. Her insight into the human condition is uncanny.
There are always many layers to her tales. The main storyline is Pitt and Charlotte, his police work and the mystery of the case he's working on in the particular book in this series, set in Victorian London. Then there is the social commentary almost as background. Ms. Perry shines a spotlight on the disparity between the classes, much of which is relatable to the disparity in income and the economic situation in the U.S. at this time. There is no preaching, it's presented simply as the setting of the scene. Her description of the physical aspect of the city and it environs paints as clear a picture as a movie.
You will come away from every book in this series changed a little bit. Entertained, enlightened, with a much clearer picture of Victorian London at that time frame. Be prepared, it's almost impossible to put down any of her books mid-read.
You will find yourself thinking of them long after you've come to the final word of her glorious works
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Did not see the killer at all even retrospectively. The story starts with Pitt being called to the scene of a dead doctor in a nasty neighborhood brutally murdered and castrated after death. Then word of a previous death comes and Pitt recognizes him as not the pimp he was now but the footman he was in a previous novel. Unsure he goes back to General Ballantyne to be sure. Bringing back old characters is always fun for long time readers. Really interesting case.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book in a series set in Victorian times following Detective Thomas Pitt. I was give book nine in the series and liked it to much that I have been buying every book in order from one, a couple of month. Now up to 16 in the series, it follows the Pitt family so well it leaves the reader feeling as if they not only know Pitt but his wife, children, sister-in-law and aunt. etc. After reading 16 of these books in the series, I feel like I know that family..
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read 8 of 31 books in this series. I finally quit them because I would overload on 1880s London. Historical accuracy questionable to me, but I could hardly put the books down. Always had an unexpected ending.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Haha! As if! And that's what makes this book so much fun! You go, Charlotte....solve those mysteries! However your husband does sound like a nice and caring guy.....and a product of his times. So glad those times have changed!!!
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
Wow. Just wow. This book really combines "what lies beneath" the tightly laced lives of Victorian women with a very face-paced mystery of a terrible crime. Appalling murders of a pimp, a very wealthy man, and a middle-income non-entity seem totally unrelated at first glance until Thomas and Charlotte Pitt, her sister Emily, and the wonderful Lady Cumming-Gould decide to look at both sides, rich and extremely poor, to find a solution and hopefully prevent other murders from occurring.

Mixed in with the story of the murders is the pain and sorrow endured by upper class girls, young marrieds, and established wives who are forced into a corset of customs and convention that tightly restrains a woman's passions, as she learns from an early age to push down dreams of love and happiness, forever burying them within a wall of resentment. A few characters from other books make an appearance, and their stories of personal and family pain which should have been forgotten is dredged up.

Although I guessed part of where the guilt lay, I did not figure it all out until the very end. Layers upon layers of personal pain led to the murders, and we only wish that some of the people who did not deserve to be hurt could have been spared. However, life is not like that, and sometimes the actions of one person can bring down an entire group of people, the sorrow rippling out to hurt others far beyond as well.

As ever, Ms Perry writes with great skill and empathy of the women in Victorian England : Charlotte, Emily, Lady Vespasia, and others are a delight to read. They are bound by convention and strictures against too much freedom, yet somehow they are able to skilfully manipulate the situations they find themselves involved in, and sometimes cheat the system.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse