Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 17 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Debt of Honor (A Jack Rya... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Tracking number provided with every order. Slight wear on edges and covers; otherwise item is in very good condition.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Debt of Honor (A Jack Ryan Novel) Mass Market Paperback – August 1, 1995

4.2 out of 5 stars 511 customer reviews
Book 7 of 10 in the A Jack Ryan Novel Series

See all 30 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.24
$2.45 $0.01

The Underground Railroad
The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent tour de force chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more
$9.24 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 17 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Debt of Honor (A Jack Ryan Novel)
  • +
  • Executive Orders (A Jack Ryan Novel)
  • +
  • Rainbow Six (A Jack Ryan Novel)
Total price: $24.16
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Razio Yamata is one of Japan's most influential industrialists, and part of a relatively small group of authority who wield tremendous authority in the Pacific Rim's economic powerhouse. He has devised a plan to cripple the American greatness, humble the U.S. military, and elevate Japan to a position of dominance on the world stage. Yamata's motivation lies in his desire to pay off a Debt of Honor to his parents and to the country he feels is responsible for their deaths: America. All he needs is a catalyst to set his plan in motion. When the faulty gas tank on one Tennessee family's car leads to their fiery death, an opportunistic U.S. congressman uses the occasion to rush a new trade law through the system. The law is designed to squeeze Japan economically. Instead, it provides Yamata with the leverage he needs to put his plan into action. As Yamata's plan begins to unfold, it becomes clear to the world that someone is launching a fully integrated operation against the United States. There's only one man to find out who the culprit is: Jack Ryan, the new president's National Security Advisor. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Jack Ryan, now the President's National Security Adviser, finds himself embroiled in the buildup to a new world war-one in which the stock market and national economic policy are as critical as advanced weaponry. A power-hungry Japanese financier, still blaming America for his parents' deaths in WWII, plans to use his immense wealth to purchase his revenge. A fatal auto accident in the U.S., caused by faulty gas tanks in two Japanese cars, leads to the breakdown of U.S.-Japanese trade agreements. Spies track each other; nuclear weapons are built and hidden; Ryan and an assortment of his old colleagues maneuver ships, planes and spies into harm's way. As always, the author of Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger spins out story threads in a rich but bewildering tangle of plot and setting, then vigorously weaves them together. Here, the heart-stopping climax is unexpected, but oddly appropriate. As always, Clancy instructs (sometimes didactically) as he entertains, teaching us about currency trading, Asian business etiquette and the daily life of an American politician. Without taking up Japan-bashing, as Michael Crichton did in Rising Sun, or partisan politics, Clancy warns that recent downsizing in the defense establishment has so depleted our military resources that the country is vulnerable to aggression that can arise anywhere, anytime. 2 million first printing; BOMC selection.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Series: A Jack Ryan Novel (Book 7)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 1008 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley (August 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425147584
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425147580
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.6 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (511 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #371,880 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Debt of Honor is a book by Tom Clancy about a war between Japan and the United States that starts over a trade disagreement. The turn of events that triggers the war are creatively thought out and frighteningly realistic. The book follows Jack Ryan as the President's National Security Advisor as well as his colleagues John Clark and Ding Chavez in the CIA. The novel covers all aspects of the war with great detail and wit including the diplomacy, espionage, technology, politics, and military usage of a war. The book pulled me in from the rising action in the beginning to the explosive ending that leads into Executive Orders, the next book in the Ryan saga. I would recommend it to anyone who enjoyed any of the Jack Ryan novels or movies.
Comment 57 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Debt of Honor" is classic Clancy fare. The plot moves rapidly, skipping from place to place as our old friend Jack Ryan frets over a bevy of global crises. This time the threat comes from Japan, where a jingoistic industrialist plots to bring America to its knees, both economically and militarily. "Debt of Honor" is enjoyable enough to read. The action moves fast and the chapters are sliced into convenient, bite-sized portions. The book's weakness, perhaps, is that the plot--and many of the sub-plots--seem a little far-fetched. E.g., Japan's invasion of Guam and Saipan goes undiscovered by the US press for several days, until an enterprising weatherman from Idaho unearths the shocking news. But Clancy's knack for explaining the technical aspects of airplanes, submarines, aircraft carriers, et al, is as good as ever. This marriage of fact with fiction is always a highlight of a Clancy novel. "Debt of Honor" may not be for everyone, but those who enjoy this genre will likely be satisfied
Comment 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Clancy has been writing the life history of Jack Ryan for many years. With each new book in the series, new aspects of Ryan are displayed, from his own internal doubts about the moral correctness of some of his actions to a dazzling display of competence in each endeavor that he attempts. Here we find Ryan involved, as a first order plot, in an economic war with Japan, waged with all the tools of modern electronic markets, where Ryan's prior experience as a Wall Street analyst is useful, believable, and comprehensible to the reader. This alone is no small feat for Clancy, as Wall Street jargon is a language all its own, and the internal workings of the markets are mainly a dark mystery to most. Of course, this being a Clancy novel, there is far more than just one main plot, and when things deteriorate to a shooting war, he does his fine job of delineating actual tactics, weapons, squad level and executive decisions to the point of making the reader feel that he is there on the front line. The characterization of Yamata, one of the main driving forces on the opposing side, is very well done, and lends a sense of inevitability to the surprising and traumatic conclusion to this book. After reading this, Executive Orders is a must read, if just to find out "Now what?" (and you won't be disappointed, as Executive Orders is as good or maybe slightly better than this one).
There are a few places where I felt Clancy could have been more concise; at times the level of detail he throws at the reader is overwhelming, and not truly necessary to developing his plot, characters, or theme.
Read more ›
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Talk about your cliff-hangers...it doesn't get much better than 'Debt of Honor' my friends. I honestly can't think of ANY book I have EVER read that leaves you with such an amazing, but frustraing ending. I echo one of the reviews of that book: The last chapter alone is worth the cost of the book. But please do NOT spoil the surprise by reading it. From a subtle but increasingly hostile Japanese agressive act on everything from the military to Wall Street, Clancy has given us a nail
biter, and one of his best, too (I STILL liked 'Sum Of All Fears' the most...). Run, don't walk to the nearest book store and grab this large book and lock yourself away for a good weekend filled with a huge adrenaline rush. How it all comes about, and what America does about the Japanese threat is truly enlightening, especially the thought that since the 'Gulf War' Mother Hubbard's Cupboard has become pretty bare of Military might. Nevertheless Clancy has given us reason to rejoice in that he has given us a FANTASTIC story with probably THE BEST (and most fustrating) ending I have ever read--you simply HAVE to read it to understand what I'm talking about...and while you do, enjoy!
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Like most Americans, I sat transfixed before my TV set on September 11, 2001, completely transfixed by the unfolding disaster on our shores. Time and time again, I watched that relentless tattoo of images cross my TV screen: hijacked passenger jets flying at full speed into the twin towers of the World Trade Center; the twin towers of that magnificent structure collapsing to the ground, one right after the other, with thousands of people inside them; and a new generation of heroes -- firefighters and police officers -- working round the clock to find survivors of these horrific events.

As I watched events unfold on that fateful day, I kept getting this nagging feeling that this story all seemed too familiar. Where had I heard it before? Was it a movie I had seen? A book I had read?

Then I remembered. Tom Clancy's novel, "Debt of Honor." At the time of its publication in 1994, it was the latest in the continuing saga of Jack Ryan, that fictional Central Intelligence Agency operative in several of Clancy's previous novels.

By the time I read "Debt of Honor" in 1994, I had found myself growing tired of Clancy's books. Each one seemed infinitely longer than its predecessor, filled with more complex twists and turns of plot; laced with more of Clancy's tiresome personal political philosophy; and filled with plots and subplots that seemed progressively more far-fetched.

When I finished "Debt of Honor," I thought Clancy had really out-done himself by creating a plot that was so unrealistic that it bordered on the ludicrous. In his usual highly charged, "grab 'em by the throat and don't let 'em go 'til the last page" fashion, Clancy took me on quite a journey. In retrospect, it was a journey I should have paid more attention to!
Read more ›
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Debt of Honor (A Jack Ryan Novel)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Debt of Honor (A Jack Ryan Novel)