Buy Used
$18.00
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by westsiderbooks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: First disc is mint, like new -- second disc has faint surface marks that do NOT affect play. Booklet clean, bright, and tight; outer packaging has minor shelf-wear from normal use at edges and corners on back.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Debussy: Pelléas et Mélisande Import

4.1 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, Import, March 6, 2003
"Please retry"
$34.49 $18.00

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream millions of songs FREE with Amazon Prime. Start your free trial.

Editorial Reviews

The 2003 reissue of Ernest Ansermet's second recording of Debussy's Pelleas et Melisande. Made in 1964, it's a near-match to his renowned 1952 monaural recording.

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 1. Introduction. Je nepourrai plus sortirde cette forêt!
  2. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 1. Pourquoi pleures-tu?
  3. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 1. Je suis perdu aussi... Interlude
  4. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 1. Voici ce qu'il écrit à son frère Pelléas
  5. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 1. Qu'en dites-vous? - Je n'en dis rien...C'est Pelléas
  6. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 1. Interlude. Il fait sombre dans les jardins...Hoé! Hoé! hisse hoé!
  7. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 2. Vous ne savez pas où je vous ai menée?
  8. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 2. Interlude
  9. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 2. Ah! ah! tout va bien, cela ne sera rien
  10. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 2. Voyons, donne-moi ta main
  11. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 2. Interlude
  12. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 2. Oui; c'est ici, nous y sommes
  13. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 3. Mes longs cheveux deschendent jusq'au seuil de la tour... Holà! Holà! ho!
  14. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 3. Je les tiens dans les main, je les tiens dans la bouche
  15. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 3. Que faites-vous ici?...Interlude
  16. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 3. Prenez garde; par ici

Disc: 2

  1. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 3. Ah! je respire enfin!
  2. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 3. Interlude
  3. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 3. Viens, nous allons nous asseoir ici, Yniold
  4. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 3. Qu'ils s'embrassent, petit père? Non, non
  5. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Où vas-tu? Il faut que je te parle ce soir
  6. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Maintenant que le père de Pelléas est sauvé
  7. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Pelléas part ce soir
  8. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Ne Mettez pas ainsi votre main à la gorge
  9. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Interlude
  10. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Oh! cette pierre est lourde
  11. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. C'est le dernier soir...Pelléas! - Mélisande!
  12. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Nous sommes venus ici il y a bien longtemps
  13. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Quel est ce bruit?...Golaud!...Ta bouche! Ta bouche!
  14. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Ce n'est pas de cette petite blessure qu'elle peut mourir
  15. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Attention; je crois qu'elle s'éveille...Ouvrez la fenêtre...Voulez-vous vous élo
  16. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Mélisande, as-tu pitié de moi comme j'ai pitié de toi?
  17. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Non, non, nous n'avons pas été coupables
  18. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Qu'avez-vous fait? Vous allez la tuer...Veux-tu voir ton enfant?
  19. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Qu'y a-t-il? Qu'est-ce que toutes ces femmes viennent faire ici?
  20. Pelléas et Mélisande, opera in 5 acts, L. 88: Act 4. Attention...Attention...Il faut parler à voix basse, maintenant


Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 6, 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Decca
  • ASIN: B00008JL7U
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #406,875 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Orchestre de la Suisse Romande Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Well, the best in stereo, anyway.
Erna Spoorenberg is a memorably pointed Melisande, with a timbre somewhat like Soderstrom but less astringent. Camille Maurane is as good a Pelleas as they come, the heir to Jacques Jansen and the end of the line in the great tradition. George London is a burly, physically frightening Golaud and Guus Hoekmann is the bassiest of Arkels. Ernest Ansermet directs his Suisse Romande Orchestra with vast knowledge, love and experience, and miraculous balance and timing. Decca/London's production team keeps the drama front and center, working rarely enough in an actual opera house.
There are great mono recordings of Pelleas, including Desormiere, Fournet and Ansermet's earlier version. There are fine individual things in stereo versions with Ingelbrecht, Baudo, Dutoit, Boulez, Jordan and Carewe (about in that order). There are Teutonized inflations with Karajan, Abbado and Haitink that have pleasures of their own.
There is also an atrocious wipeout with Casadesus on Naxos that testifies to the death of the French performing tradition. The singing there is the worst of any Pelleas recording. This Ansermet reissue is actually sold by Amazon for less than the Naxos version, so there is no reason anymore for anyone to buy that terrible night in Lille under Casadesus.
You can buy this Ansermet recording in the warm, comforting knowledge that you have paid for the cheapest commercial stereo CD set of Pelleas, and also the best at any price.
Comment 33 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
For me, Ansermet is the star of this recording, for, along with Desormiere, Inghelbrecht and Boulez (on his Welsh Opera production on DVD, not his sony CD) he brings out the distinctive blend of atmosphere, mystery, tension and drama of this wonderful music. By comparison, Karajan in trying to create an otherworldly altmosphere merely winds up sounding bland, and Abbado, while obtaining beautiful playing from the Vienna Philharmonic, sounds too heavy handed, thus undermining the half-lit quality of mystery that the music should convey. The quality of the singers is very fine, though I wish Camille Maurane had a bit more bloom in his voice; my main caveat is that George London as the middle-aged Golaud is too basso in sound to meaningfully contrast with the basso of the elderly Arkel.
This recording is my primary recommendation for Pelleas on CD for, in addition to the foregoing, it has excellent sound and is priced at the budget level. In comparison to my two other favorites on CD, the Desormiere, being from 1941, is obviously limited sonically, and the Inghelbrecht is only available in a not widely available five CD set, which includes other music of Debussy, and is priced at nearly sixty dollars.
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When I started to take a serious interest in "Pelléas et Mélisande," it was with this recording that I started (even though it wasn't quite rated the best in the "Penguin Record (now CD) Guide." It got 2 out of 3 stars, with Ansermet's tempi + Spoorenberg's characterization of Mélisande both being under attack. Well, speaking for myself (having finally bought this release of the recording {thus refreshing my memory - and even revealing a slight change of taste...}, which I had earlier contrasted with those of Herbert von Karajan and Armin Jordan {the latter of which is unavailable these days} long ago), let the following stand:

While Ansermet's tempi and orchestral balances may not be quite as dramatic or riveting as Karajan's EMI/Angel and - subsequently - Abbado's DGG recordings in many respects (and yes, quite a few times Karajan and Abbado have the edge here also in terms of orchestral playing and overall conception in addition to allowing the music to roar when it is best to do so, Debussy's restraint notwithstanding!), it often also best brings out the poetry of this unique opera, assisted by Decca/London's outstanding recording.

[It should be pointed out that "Pelléas et Mélisande" very possibly IMHO is not only the most subtle and atmospheric opera ever written, but also an example of how much the voice can do better in characterization with Debussy's approach than the conventional way almost everybody else uses!]

Also, while Frederica von Stade (for Karajan) frequently sounds a bit too coquettish and actively part of events (though still better vocally than Maria Ewing for Abbado - she's the principal liability there!!!
Read more ›
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Aficionados of Pelleas et Melisande (it attracts them) tend to know every recording and to argue over every nuance in an opera that is practically all nuance. Ernet Ansermet was Decca's house conductor of French music for decades, and his classic first Pelleas, in mono, featured the great Suzanne Danco. But this, his stereo remake, is among the least French of the famous performances. Ansermet is quite forthright, even plain, and ignores what most conductors try to achieve: a gossamer, mysterious, half-lit msical atmosphere. That's all to the good if you find Debussy's elusiveness too much (as I tend to).

The cast in general sounds less wispy, too, with George london a rare basso Golaud, weighty and physical in his presence--we hardly ever get a Wagnerian crashing the gates of Pelleas's dream world. Erna Spoorenberg also breaks the mold; unlike most Melisandes, she isn't fragile or unearthly. She sounds almost sensible, and her voice has no baby-girl fragility or tremulousness. The only conventional lead is the Pelleas of Camille Maurane, whose nasally, tenorish baritone is to the manner born.

In sum, this amounts to a frothright Pelleas that some Debussians woun't naturally warm up to, but I like its earthiness very much. It's a relaxed performance whose flame doesn't rise high, but in a more modest way it's very appealing. Decca's sound is clear, detailed, and natural.
1 Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category