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The Declared Enemy: Texts and Interviews (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) 1st Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
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ISBN-10: 0804729468
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Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

This posthumous work brings together articles, interviews, statements, prefaces, manifestos, and speeches dating from 1964 to 1985 (just before Genet's death in 1986). These texts bear witness to the many political causes and groups with which Genet felt an affinity, including May ’68 and the treatment of immigrants in France, but especially the Black Panthers and the Palestinians. We follow him from the Chicago Democratic Convention (where he met William Burroughs and Alan Ginsberg) to Yale University, where he gave the famous May Day Speech in support of the Black Panthers, to Jordan and the Palestinian camps. Along the way, Genet finds allies (George Jackson, Angela Davis, Leyla Shahid, Tahar Ben Jelloun). And, of course, enemies.
Between passionate enmity and passionate affinity, Genet speaks for a politics of protest, with an uncompromising outrage that, today, might seem on the verge of being forgotten.
The texts are accompanied by detailed editorial notes.

About the Author

Jean Genet (1910-1986), poet, novelist, playwright, and political essayist, was one of the most significant French writers of the twentieth century. His work, much of it considered scandalous when it first appeared, is now placed among the classics of modern literature and has been translated and performed throughout the world.
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Product Details

  • Series: Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics
  • Paperback: 408 pages
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (January 7, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0804729468
  • ASIN: B005CDURZ8
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,650,442 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Being based on words from Genet's own mouth, this book reinforces the views I already had that Genet was totally self-centred and pathologically difficult for the sake of it. For all the interest some of his writing has he still, in my view, comes across as a very manipulative person - manipulative of other people and manipulative of facts and truths. His support of various political causes (Black Power and the Palestinians, for example) remains admirable and interesting as well, given that following his personal life and history, these causes would seem on the surface to be a bad fit for him unless one considers the "outsider" and "outcast" role he played all his life.
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