Bubble Witch Saga 3 Industrial Deals Best Books of the Month Red Shoes We Love nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc Stream your favorites. Amazon music Unlimited. Learn more. All-New Fire 7, starting at $49.99 Starting at $39.99 Grocery Handmade Gift Shop Home and Garden Book a house cleaner for 2 or more hours on Amazon TheTick TheTick TheTick  Three new members of the Echo family Fire HD 8, starting at $79.99 Kindle Paperwhite AutoRip in CDs & Vinyl Shop now TG18PP_gno



on February 22, 2013
This book is not as good as Wolff's "Occupy the Economy."

It lays out the same basic proposal--worker controlled workplaces--but treats it in a more academic and stuffy way.

In "Occupy the Economy," Wolff is on fire. He not only explains his positions, he advocates for them. He gives a wealth of history and fact to support his conclusions.

But here, in "Democracy at Work," he confines himself to an abstract, almost soporific, presentation.

This is a shame, because his ideas have real merit.

Wish I could give five stars, but after "Occupy the Economy," this one's a letdown.
0Comment| 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on June 5, 2013
This book does a good job of explaining the problem of capitalism, including state capitalism (misnamed as socialism).
Essentially, it's very undemocratic, and tightly controlled by a few at the top, whether private sector or the state. It spends
a lot of time, too much in my opinion, talking & reiterating the problems of capitalism, and not even close enough time discussing the options of cures for the problems. It only briefly touches on coops and democratically workers directed enterprises, including leaving out vital details about Mondragon in Spain and other working options, leaving the reader hanging.

Rather than spending so much time on private and state capitalism, and their failures, spending the majority of the time and focus on the democratic alternatives of worker owned and directed enterprises would make this a much stronger book.
Thus, I gave it a 4 rather than a 5 star rating. We need to know and develop the alternatives to economic capitalism to be better able to replace it. I hope Richard Wolff will maintain his focus on this in a future book.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on December 1, 2015
With a critical assessment of capitalism and its inherent deficiencies, Richard Wolff offers a theory of simplicity and persuasiveness. Worker Self Directed Enterprises (WSDE) are the foundation for the proposed economic theory. It is argued that a true state democracy cannot be sustained without a total democracy in the workplace. And a true democracy in the workplace will not be realized if the appropriators of surplus are not identical to the producers. A quick, not too technical read, for those interested in cutting edge economics.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on August 8, 2015
Wolff presents a very logical and compelling case (as always) for a more "social" democracy. While his arguments are straight forward with many good examples, the years he spent immersed in academia are obvious on every page; meaning, expect to use the left side of your brain more than you're used to. That said, this is an important work and one that presents a viable solution to a major problem with 21st Century society.

The idea that the majority of working people have become wage slaves and spend most the best hours of the day (and most of the week) working for companies in which they have no stock in, or say in how they are run, is unacceptable.

In an ideal world, Wolff would have a cabinet position in the Executive Branch of government.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on August 17, 2017
Clearly written, practical answers, great examples and call to action. Good for those who haven't given this thought, or for the well-informed looking to crystallize their thinking on this critical matter.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on June 21, 2013
Richard Wolff gives a solid overview of the problems of both private and state capitalism. He outlines the need to avoid jumping from one system to the other each time crisis occurs. He offers an alternative to each, WSDE (Workers self-directed enterprises). This seems like a great idea for the positive movement of workers and society itself where workers themselves control their workplace and distribution of the surplus they produce. I enjoyed this book. Such a transition to an alternative economy would be a major undertaking. If it were possible I would have liked Mr. Wolff to give his opinions/suggestions on what steps the worker can take to help begin to make this transition happen with continued success.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on April 21, 2013
This is a serious beginning of a second American revolution. It is a wonderful book that traces American history from the depression and FDRs negotiated way out, to the years that followed with the rescission of the New Deal in favor of the boom and bust cycle that we are back to now. And it explains the WSDE [Workers' self-directed enterprises], movement: what it can do and how it could work as an alternative economy for the USA. Wolff is a scholarly economist with iconoclastic views. Revolutionaries must read this. Others may wish to wait until the revolution begins.
...in 1929 the average US family had debts roughly equal to 30 percent of its annual income. In 2007 account to the Federal Reserve, the comparable number was well over 100 percent.
...The steadily produced more output in goods and services per hour, year after year. Meanwhile, the gap showed up as expanding employer profits. Since real wages stayed flat as productivity kept rising, profits kept climbing...businesses focused on helping the newly rich find profitable investments to become yet richer...ABS [asset backed securities] and their associated derivatives...
...First, stagnant real wages and rising productivity sharply altered the distribution of income and wealth...Second, the working class responded by borrowing vast sums to postpone the end of rising consumption...Third, employers and the rich lent back to the workers, via ABS [asset backed securities], a portion of the extra profits they made from real-wage stagnation... But the pattern was unsustainable....
...two facts define WSDEs [Workers' self-directed enterprises]: that the appropriation and distribution of the surplus are done cooperatively and that the workers who cooperatively produce the surplus and those who cooperatively appropriate and distribute it are identical.

Jerry Woolpy
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on July 9, 2014
I happened to catch this Professor on TV one night and decided to read his book. I haven't finished it yet but it seems like a book you don't read through all at once, you pick out chapters that might interest you and then you read it. A good book anyway.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on December 25, 2016
Richard Wolff has a solution for keeping jobs in the USA. Brilliant Man.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on August 13, 2014
Analysis by a very active contemporary activist. See his website.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse