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Deprivers Paperback – Bargain Price, November 30, 2003

3.2 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Paperback, Bargain Price, November 30, 2003
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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Altman, co-creator of the theme anthology The Touch, a well-received charity venture that allowed contributors to riff on the imaginary Sensory Deprivation Syndrome (communicated through skin contact with a "Depriver"), has taken SDS and built a two-part novel around it, but its effects pale beside similar comic-book antihero fare such as the popular X-Men films or The X-Files. In part one, Cassandra, Queen of the Depriver underground, recruits Robert Luxley, a Depriver assassin whose touch causes 15 minutes of paralysis, to help retrieve her brother Nicholas from the clutches of the ambiguously evil Mr. Deveraux. With the help of Sparrow, a mystically inclined Lakota Indian, Robert learns how to recognize other Deprivers by their auras. Unfortunately, the action quickly bogs down as various characters discuss ethical options instead of wholeheartedly battling the factions that would use SDS for their own nefarious ends. In part two, Alex Crowley, a normal man who loved his Depriver wife and now wants revenge for her murder, turns to Sparrow's Indian mentor for help. The better parts of the novel focus on Alex's vision quest. After he becomes a secret agent, he has to fight his conscience more than he fights the bad guys. This book succeeds neither in creating archetypal comic-book antiheroes nor in humanizing the characters enough to give them three-dimensional depths.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Altman's paranoid thriller plays on the same fear of the unknown that countless others have exploited over the years. The "deprivers," victims of Sensory Deprivation Syndrome, have the capability of depriving others of a variety of things, and they cause everything from blindness to deafness to paralysis. Robert Luxley has forged a career as an assassin out of his ability to paralyze, and then he discovers other deprivers. After they and their capabilities becomes common knowledge, there is an outcry for their mandatory registration and limiting their rights because they are dangers to society. The story follows first Luxley's and then groups of deprivers' struggles for understanding and equality, turning later to agent Crowley of the Ministry, a top-secret organization that has a reactionary attitude toward deprivers. Crowley, married to a depriver but not one himself, tries to temper the damage deprivers do. In the end, a not-entirely-surprising potential solution of the depriver problem is achieved, and several ends are left tantalizingly loose. Regina Schroeder
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • ISBN-10: 0441010938
  • ASIN: B000C4SSIA
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,367,672 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Wooley in PSL VINE VOICE on November 19, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Steven-Elliot Altman can never decide what direction the book should go. So we get sci-fi, social statements, intrigue, and on and on and repeat. I started the book and thought, oh, so cool, but that was replaced as I continued with oh, here we go. Way too confusing. The authur can write but the message in this one isn't consistant.
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Format: Paperback
The more I think about this book, the less I like it. Mildly interesting concepts bogged down by characters you won't care about and a story without focus, capped by an ending that negates whatever points the author was attempting to make. Two stars, one for each shoulder I'm shrugging in ambivalence towards this tale.
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Format: MP3 CD
This is the single most vapid, useless and moronic book I may have ever read. I had to read it for work and threatened to quit if I had to read it beyond 40 pages. I can't honestly believe people think there is potential in this book.
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Format: Paperback
This book is classic X-Men, you just need to substitute the word "Depriver" for "Mutant." Actually, the mutation is that in near future some people will develop the ability to deprive other of particular senses (sight, taste, balance) by touch. Once the government finds out about it, they want to pass registration acts and require deprivers to wear gloves. Like I said, its X-Men Revisted.
In part two of the book, a "normal" who married a depriver is on a quest to find out who killed his wife. Again, this strikes me as straight out of the Fugitive.
The derivative nature of this book notwithstanding, it's not a bad read. The pace moves quickly and some of the characters are moderately interesting. Makes a good book to read on a plane.
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Format: Paperback
He turned a handicap into a high paying career as an assassin for hire. Robert Luxley has a "talent" that allows him to paralyze a person with one touch for fifteen minutes, enabling him to make a clean kill. He doesn't know that there are others like him suffering sensory deprivation syndrome (SDS) until he meets Cassandra. She too is a Depriver who wants his help finding her twin brother Nicholas, kidnapped by a radical group of Deprivers.
While Cassie's brother is in captivity, he learns that the government is on the verge of discovering them and outing them to the general public. The extremists, led by Governor Tynsdale, want federal laws mandating that Deprivers register and wear gloves at all times. When Nicholas breaks free of his confinement he meets Cassie and their underground group at their New Jersey house. They and other deprivers fly to Holland to announce their existence before the government can put their own spin on SDS.
DEPRIVERS is a raw, compelling and thought-provoking work of science fiction that leaves readers very unsettled because they project the official treatment of Deprivers onto what has happened to groups in post 9/11 society. The audience will believe that the government will stereotype all Deprivers into one group, spun as dangerous and thus rationalize second class citizenship. There are many heroes in this book who use whatever weapons at hand to diffuse tensions and hostilities between Deprivers and normals.
Harriet Klausner
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