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Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by [Millard, Candice]
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Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President Kindle Edition

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Product Details

  • File Size: 8110 KB
  • Print Length: 354 pages
  • Publisher: Anchor; 1st edition (September 20, 2011)
  • Publication Date: September 20, 2011
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004J4X33O
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,613 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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By TChris TOP 500 REVIEWER on September 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover
James Garfield is most often remembered, if at all, as the president who was assassinated shortly after taking office. Destiny of the Republic brings the dead president back to life. This is not, however, a biography of Garfield. Rather, it is a stirring account of American life and politics during the time of the Garfield presidency, not long after the conclusion of the Civil War, and of a presidential murder. Garfield's early years are sketched out in cursory fashion, his (sometimes troubled) relationship with and eventual devotion to his wife Lucretia is covered in only a few pages, and the death of his youngest child receives little more than a mention. Rather than focusing on Garfield's personal life, Candice Millard devotes her attention to political divisions within the Republican Party (particularly Garfield's battles with New York Senator Roscoe Conkling and the vice president he controlled), as well as Garfield's frustration with the obligations of the office that he had little desire to hold.

The president's assassin is given nearly as much attention as the president. There are times when the book has the feel of a thriller, as the ominous Charles Guiteau weaves in and out of the text, inching himself closer to the president. Millard depicts Guiteau as a con man with delusions of grandeur whose madness was characterized by a growing belief that his plan to assassinate Garfield was divinely inspired.

The assassination occurs at the book's midway point. Millard then treats us to a different kind of political battle, a medical drama about doctors who vie for the opportunity to treat the president and who, ironically, become responsible for his death.
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Format: Hardcover
If the 20th U. S. President, James A. Garfield, had not been so well attended by doctors, he very well might have survived being shot by an assassin. If his doctors, especially the controlling and pompous Dr. Doctor Bliss (no, Dr. Doctor is not a mistype), had been willing to practice Lister's antisepsis techniques, Garfield might have lived. And if the assassin, Guiteau, hadn't been a megalomaniac who thought he was supposed to kill the president, the medical care would never have been needed. As it was, Garfield died slowly and very painfully, and we never were able to benefit from the president he could have been.

As sad as the story is, I loved the telling of it in this book. Author Candice Millard did a wonderful job of tying together the different people most important in this tragedy, and the mood of the times. I would never have known otherwise that Alexander Graham Bell invented a metal detector so that he could try to locate the bullet still in Garfield's body. I needed a bit stronger stomach than I have to read about Garfield's treatment and the progression of his illness. And, 130 years after his death, I am sorry that he did not get the chance to live his full potential as president. I highly recommend this excellent book.

Thank you to the publisher for giving me an advance reader's edition of the book.
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Format: Hardcover
I didn't know that much about our twentieth president prior to this book. What I did know: that he was Republican, in office for a short amount of time, and was shot and lingered for months afterwards. Turns out, after reading Candice Miller's wonderful new book, "Destiny of the Republic", there was much more to President James Garfield than I first knew. I ended up with a single question after reading the book: Who was the real killer?

The first mention of Garfield that intrigued me recently came in 1861: The Civil War Awakening by Adam Goodhart. There, a chapter featured a youngish Garfield, empowered, on the verge of his war greatness, yet somehow innocent and compelling. Had I not read that chapter in 1861, I may have completely skipped over this book. Fortunately I didn't, because Candice Millard's book on his assassination poses many questions, and is incredibly intriguing.

Millard's prose is quick, creating a true page turner. Not overly dwelling in minute details, Millard raises the president from boyhood to presidency quickly, from his hardscrabble existence to his later glories on the battlefield and in the political arena. Garifeld, the man who never wanted to become president, found himself the candidate to break a deadlock in the election. Stepping up to the office, Garfield, saddled with a running mate from a political machine, Chester Arthur, wins and embraces the role of president he would have for a few short months.

We also track the life of the crazed assassin Charles Guiteau, deranged office seeker who was convinced he put Garfield in office with a singular weak speech and then showed up to claim his rightful spot in the administration.
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Format: Hardcover
Having recently enjoyed the quirky Matthew Algeo book about Grover Cleveland, The President Is a Sick Man: Wherein the Supposedly Virtuous Grover Cleveland Survives a Secret Surgery at Sea and Vilifies the Courageous Newspaperman Who Dared Expose the Truth, I was ready to tackle another 19th century president.

Destiny of the Republic, which is a phrase from a nominating speech James A. Garfield gave at the Republican convention of 1880, is a fine bit of flowery oratory, but as a book title, I find it completely forgettable. "Decline of the Nation? Debacle of the Century? No, but it's something similar..."

Aside from the dull title, the book is a corker. In the first scene we find our hero, Congressman Garfield, at the Centennial Exposition in Pennsylvania in 1876. He strides along, taking in the displays, while other attendees pay to be pushed in wheelchairs. It seems the spectacle of agile people hopping in and out of their rental rascal scooters at the State Fair that I just visited is part of a long American tradition.

This is not a traditional presidential biography. Instead, Candice Millard has focused the book on the attempted assassination of Garfield and the excruciating two months that followed his shooting.

Millard describes Garfield's rise from poor childhood to academic to state representative to president. On separate but converging paths to Garfield's story are the narratives of Charles Guiteau, the unhinged man who shot Garfield, and inventor Alexander Graham Bell, who was feverishly working on a kind of x-ray/metal detector that everyone hoped would save the president's life.
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