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Destroyer [Remastered] Original recording remastered

4.3 out of 5 stars 374 customer reviews

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Destroyer (Remastered Version)
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Audio CD, Original recording remastered, August 12, 1997
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Product Description

Kiss's heavy glam sound expanded with choirs, strings and sound effects on this 1976 album (a #11 LP). The ballad Beth was the smash, but Detroit Rock City ; the hit Flaming Youth , and God of Thunder gave fans more raging rockers to love!

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With their 1976 album Destroyer, the band's fifth release in two years, Kiss began to expand their fan base by shedding a bit of their edge, taking on a more melodic sound and a less menacing image. The Peter Criss ballad "Beth," written for his wife, is the most sentimental love ballad the group ever recorded, and songs like "Detroit Rock City" and "Shout It Out Loud" had the kind of arena-rock punch that kept subscriptions to the Kiss Army at an all-time high. Despite, or because of, the blatantly commercial direction the band seemed to be heading in, 1976 was the most creatively rewarding period in its lengthy career. In addition to releasing Destroyer, the band pumped out the equally touted album Rock and Roll Over, which included the pounding "Take Me" and the groovin' "Calling Dr. Love." The only finer year was 1978, when the band starred in the classic B-grade flick Kiss Meets the Phantom of the Park. --Jon Wiederhorn
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 12, 1997)
  • Rmst ed. edition
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Mercury
  • ASIN: B000001EL3
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (374 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #993 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
There are alot of negative reviews for this disc which was rumoured to be a double disc event. For a 35th Anniversary reissue, this is not at all worthy of that moniker. It is a disappointing revist to say the least. Bob Ezrin approached KISS about this remix because he wanted to do something for its 35th. But the thing about Ezrin's recording is that so much of it was premixed during the making of it and many of the tracks were recorded "wet" (meaning that there was no way to EVER alter its effects, etc). So, from the get-go, this project had many limitations, as he notes in the cd booklet. There are differences, however. For examples, an omitted background vocal from the archived tape of "Detroit Rock City" makes its debut along with an added effect to the end of the last verse. Also, Ace's stinging feedback intro to "King..." isn't as prominent. The piano is more upfront in "Great Expectations" . And there are other such differences throughout. Then there is "Sweet Pain" with a different solo (I, myself, was hoping that the different solo was going to be an Ace Frehley outtake) and louder harmonized gang vocals folowing the guitar part. Overall, the mix is more present. The piano agumentations on some songs is not as noticable (eg, Detroit...) and in the process it sounds more "band" like because it sounds more like just the four guys. The opposite approach could have produced a KISS Symphony version . The drum sound (as noticed in the beginning of "Shout...") is tighter, with less air.

With all of the differences, however, this release is "nothing new" and the lack of fanfare is most distressing. Diehard fans will notice the differences but those who are just coming to the band will not even be able to appreciate them. So, for a 35th Anniversary, this really is targeted at diehards.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It is cool to see this CD get some kind of treatment after all these years. Granted, there is not a heck of a lot to hold your hopes on. The remix is not bad, but it does take away a lot of the mysticism and allure from the original. The Original version was kind of dark and had a muddy sound that was really different for its time. When I was a kid i would stare at the cover all day and just listen in awe to the darker vibe of Kiss. Very, very different from the straight, clean sounding 'Dressed to Kill' which was their prior studio effort. These songs were longer, more adventurous and the album as a whole had a great flow to it. A lot of that (in fact most of that) can be attributed to Bob Ezrin and his more artistic approach to producing. The layers he created, the effects, the orchestration and slower songs all made this album the perfect showcase to go with the bands image and show. What an album for its time. A true classic.

Then there is this. It isnt over the top different, but just enough to make it slide more to the 'rock' style of Kiss. Some of that darkness is lost a little but it really doesn't do it much harm either. I still would prefer the Original version easily over this. BUT be forewarned that myself and most others writing negative stuff grew up on this album. We worshiped it. Knew all the words to all the songs, had posters on our walls and this album was the reason for that. We probably have all heard this 1000+ times. So a bias is definitely there. Why change a masterpiece that holds so many memories? Well, really, after 35 years why not.

My biggest disappointment is that it didnt go a little further with content.
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Format: Audio CD
This is garbage. Gene and Paul had nothing to do with it because they don't own the masters of their original studio albums anymore, so this was done totally by Ezrin. Yes everything is remixed marginally, so if you've been listening to Destroyer for decades you will notice slight differences. But where is the bonus stuff? This was originally advertised as a two disc set with demos, live stuff etc. None of that made it, not even the already-released demos that appeared on the 2001 KISS Box set, let alone stuff like "None of Your Business" (sung by Peter) that was demoed at the time. Where is all the live stuff? There are countless Destroyer-era concerts professionally recorded. Also, the blurb about this cover being the original 1975 Ken Kelly painting is bogus. The original 1975 rough image that was rejected by Casablanca for being "too violent" is available on the web, it's the one that is seen in KISStory and on the KISS My A## DVD. This version is a modern repainting of that, done by Ken Kelly in the last ten years. It's signed "1975" which is another fabrication. Seems that nothing KISS does these days isn't surrounded by lies and false advertising? To sum it up, this is a massive wasted opportunity. See the excellent "Deluxe Edition" series for how this SHOULD have been done - a second disc full of live stuff, rare demos, working mixes etc. Not this ca$h-grab that ultimately, with the exception of one previously-unheard guitar solo, offers nothing. Also : there are glitches in the mastering of this, there are several pops and clicks and errors which have been discussed in length on the KISS forums. There is a glaringly obvious bad edit in the intro to "Flaming Youth" that makes the whole song skip a beat. This is garbage.
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