Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Detroit: I Do Mind Dying: A Study in Urban Revolution (Updated Edition) (South End Press Classics Series) Revised Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0896085718
ISBN-10: 0896085716
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
More Buying Choices
8 New from $45.96 21 Used from $5.49
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Excel2016ForDummiesVideo
Excel 2016 For Dummies Video Training
Discover what Excel can do for you with self-paced video lessons from For Dummies. Learn more.
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Series: South End Press Classics Series (Book 2)
  • Paperback: 254 pages
  • Publisher: South End Press; Revised edition (July 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0896085716
  • ISBN-13: 978-0896085718
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.7 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #572,285 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
We often here about the 1960s as a time of radicalization for students and mystical urban heroes. Rarely is the working-class and trade union struggle ever revealed. Partly that is because working-class struggle was not at the heart of the civil rights movement and the anti-war movement. But Detroit: I Do Mind Dying tells a different story; one of a core of revolutionaries in the industrial heart of America within a union with a radical past. These black revolutionaries take on the racism of the bosses, as well as the racism of the union beauracracy, in a daring and valliant attempt to bring about real social change. Some lessons for activists, trade unionists, and socialists today are included by the authors. Questions of organizing white workers; the need for a national party; wildcat strikes to take on both the company and the union beauracracy; and the need to have an international perspective. All of theses lessons are brought forth from the struggles of the League of Revolutionary Black Workers and all of the Revolutionary Union Movements in the Detroit area. A must read for activists today.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Incredible promise that went unfulfilled. This is how I would summarize the history of the League of Revolutionary Black Workers, which existed primarily in Detroit and its many auto plants around the late 60s-early 70s. This book is excellently written, bringing the reader into a high-point of movement activity that saw for example workers shooting their bosses and being acquitted because of unsafe working conditions, among other victories that seem astonishing in the rear-view mirror 40 years later.

Things have changed, but this book does well to humanize and contextualize the organizing efforts of those involved in the Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement (DRUM) and affiliated organizations during that time. This isn't just a trip down nostalgia lane. Figures such as General Baker, Ken Cockrel, and Mike Hamlin are shown to be complete human beings, with flaws, but with remarkable talent as well, and the strategies they employed are discussed and elaborated to make for a compelling read. Another key to this book's brilliance is the explanation of the dynamic between the traditional bureaucratic, reformist (and somewhat racist) union, the United Auto Workers (UAW), and the League with it's revolutionary black politics. It's partially a study in co-optation - at one point the UAW physically prevents a strike from taking place, and forces workers back to work! Amazing stuff.

The book is not perfect - for example it contains a rather long commentary from a white worker/organizer at one of the plants which is not matched by commentaries from the black organizers who organized ELRUM at that plant. Another drawback is the seemingly sectarian approach the authors take towards certain movement actors, such as James Forman.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book is full of beautiful historical accounts of the Black workers and their struggles for justice in Detroit. You learn about trade union factions, the struggle to remove a racist police SWAT team called STRESS, a Communist Judge, and countless other stories that never made it into the formal history of the 1970s.

Great! Excellent! Educational!
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse