Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Devalued and Distrusted: Can the Pharmaceutical Industry Restore its Broken Image? 1st Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1118487471
ISBN-10: 1118487478
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$14.63 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$21.18 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
27 New from $17.32 18 Used from $10.63
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Excel2016ForDummiesVideo
Excel 2016 For Dummies Video Training
Discover what Excel can do for you with self-paced video lessons from For Dummies. Learn more.
$21.18 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Devalued and Distrusted: Can the Pharmaceutical Industry Restore its Broken Image?
  • +
  • Drug Truths: Dispelling the Myths About Pharma R & D
  • +
  • The Truth About the Drug Companies: How They Deceive Us and What to Do About It
Total price: $63.44
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Oz should invite LaMattina back on his show.  Since LaMattina treats all concerns respectfully, Oz needn’t worry about feeling devalued or distrusted."  (Barron's, 5 May 2014)

“This is an honest book by an insider who believes in the basic good that the industry does.”  (The Quarterly Review of Biology, 1 September 2013)

“Summing Up:  Recommended.  General audiences.”  (Choice, 1 September 2013)

“For those more loosely associated or aspiring to work with in it, I particularly recommend this book as a balanced and informative read on the pressures the industry faces. It should also provide the basis for more reasoned argument and forewarn anyone else potentially ambushed by a TV show.”  (ChemMedChem, 19 July 2013)

“That said, the suggestions made by LaMattina for improvements in productivity and transparency are timely, and the book makes interesting if unexciting reading.”  (Chemistry & Industry, 1 June 2013)

“John LaMattina (ex-head of Pfizer's global R&D) has a new book out about the industry, called Devalued and Distrusted.  He tells Pharmalot that he got the idea to write a sequel to his earlier book, Drug Truths, when he appeared on the "Dr. Oz" show.”  (In The Pipeline, 1 December 2012)

 

Review

“ … the book is laden with so many facts, critical insights and pearls of wisdom that it deserves the attention of a wide audience, from lay people to professionals in R&D, medicine, government, business and mass media. Dr. LaMatina has performed a public service by drawing on his broad experience to clarify the issues and the many challenges that have to be faced if progress in therapeutic molecular medicine is to continue, and to illuminate the ongoing tensions that are bound to arise with ever increasing risks and costs in pharma and biotech R&D, never-perfect new medicines and constantly rising consumer expectations and government involvement.”—E J Corey, Harvard University

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 136 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (January 9, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1118487478
  • ISBN-13: 978-1118487471
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.4 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,135,272 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Related Media

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Deb HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 6, 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
John LaMattina's lengthy career in the pharmaceutical industry had prepared him for close encounters of many kinds, but nothing could have prepared him for his encounter with Dr. Oz. Perhaps it was ignorance that led him to believe that his appearance on one of Dr. Oz's television segments would be relatively benign, but he had another thing coming. Next time, no doubt, LaMattina will ask questions. A lot of them. Undoubtedly shock set in once he realized that he, along with big pharma, was the target of the day. Monstrous villains, evil money-mongers who were only out for one thing ... themselves and that buck. Right on down the yellow brick road LaMattina went in an effort to explain away the "Four Secrets That Drug Companies Don't Want You to Know."

The statements, of course, were inflammatory and LaMattina answered them as best he could. The audience reaction clearly indicated that the questions needed further explanation. This book is a result of those four questions. I had only one problem with this book and that was to keep people from walking off with it before I had finished it. It is not a lengthy tome and in fact it can be read in a day if one is so inclined. It is written with the layman in mind, yet has sufficient references for those who wish to explore the topic further. The risks to the public, who may have decided to discard prescribed medications as a result of the show, were plentiful. LaMattina lamented that "oftentimes diet and exercise are not sufficient to reduce the risk of these diseases [diabetes, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, etc.]; and at some point specific medicines may be required to restore a person's health to prevent long-term consequences of the disease." (p.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Are you, like me, moving on in years, exercising less, taking more pills for more conditions, and beginning to get worried about where all that is taking you?

Read a half page anywhere in this book, and I think you'll agree the author knows his stuff. He gives you the inside story in full and readable detail about the issues and the facts affecting important drug decisions that you may have to make.

Like you and I, the drug industry is going through a difficult passage as the cost of medical care rises and new controls are applied to address that. If you'd like to be informed about the tough choices that you and the drug industry are now being forced to make for the sake of your pocketbook, I encourage you to read this book.

You probably won't ever get to sit down and hear straight talk from a retired drug industry president of significant stature. Reading this book is the next best thing.

I only wish that the publisher had found it a better title!
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
John LaMattina is a thirty-year veteran of the pharmaceutical industry and former president of Pfizer's Global R&D Division, an ultimate insider of the pharmaceutical world. While there is much I dislike about the pharmaceutical industry, it is very interesting to read his account.

However his critique of traditional remedies is fraught with inaccuracies. For example the use of Ginkgo biloba leaves for cognitive impairment is not a traditional use- the Chinese never significantly used ginkgo leaves and this use was derived from the modern German pharmaceutical industry which is far more open to botanical treatments than the US. While it showed little effect for people of normal cognition as he rightly points out, smaller trials show some advantage for people with Alzheimer's.

He points out that cysteine has a weaker effect at stopping smoking than Chantix, which is true. But unlike Chantix it doesn't have the psychopathological effects that I have seen in my own family members who attempted to use it to stop smoking. While he never points out the serious side effects of Chantix, now (but not initially) in the required list of side effects read in television commercials (always listen with your eyes closed to avoid distracting calming pictures) a lower efficacy is better than iatrogenic mental disease.

He is also a strong proponent of statins, citing much lower side effects than I see clinically (which makes me suspicious of the statistics cited.) But since statins can cause diabetes, muscle dysfunction and can clog liver CYP450 liver pathways, prescribing them is not the slam dunk he believes.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
My brain is aware of what this book calls sedation, dry mouth, and arrhythmia as side effects from some medications that I associate with people in Minneapolis who thought I was crazy and tried to turn me into a highly medicated individual. Our society functions on high mobility, but those who are not mobile try to avoid phone conversations with anyone who is likely to tell us to call 9-1-1 to be taken to someplace where we will be treated for derangement. The F.D.A. failed to approve a combination drug that fools the brain into thinking anything sweet is unappetizing because symptoms arising from old man fat dread are not always the best way to get our society to only 500,000 first-time heart attacks each year. LaMattina calls himself a senior partner who would have occupational glee if only 500,000 Americans had a first-time heart attack each year because they take enough statins to keep from having 510,000 heart attacks. Millions of Americans would be taking pills to reduce the risk factors associated with the way Americans live, eat, and throw what they are not using right now in the trash.

In my lifetime, institutional thinking has assumed that hundreds of millions of Americans can be treated like patients so hundreds of thousands will have extra years of life. I took beta blockers to slow my heartbeat so the heart muscle would not have fatal arrhythmia before I had lived a normal lifespan. I seem young now compared to old people walking around like zombies on pacemakers and former stroke victims. The F.D.A. wants 10,000 users of a new drug to live long enough for five years of test results before we get new forms of brain control that reduce diabetes, cardiovascular events, and the terror of meaningless activities becoming expenses of the last illness that reduce estates.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Devalued and Distrusted: Can the Pharmaceutical Industry Restore its Broken Image?
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Devalued and Distrusted: Can the Pharmaceutical Industry Restore its Broken Image?