Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Developing Enterprise Web Services: An Architect's Guide: An Architect's Guide

4.2 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0131401600
ISBN-10: 0131401602
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$14.94 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$44.35 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
13 New from $14.95 27 Used from $0.01
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Excel2016ForDummiesVideo
Excel 2016 For Dummies Video Training
Discover what Excel can do for you with self-paced video lessons from For Dummies. Learn more.
$44.35 FREE Shipping. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Build Web services with enterprise-class reliability, performance, and value

Web services are transforming IT, and represent a powerful new way to reduce cost and drive top-line growth throughout the enterprise. This book takes a no-nonsense view of architecting and constructing enterprise-class Web services and applications. The authors expertly assess the current state of the Web services platform, offering best practices and new architectural patterns for leveraging the advantages of Web services--and mitigating the risks.

  • Build Web services and applications that meet enterprise requirements for security, mobility, transactions, QoS, workflow, portlets, management, and more
  • Avoid the "bottomless pit" of application rewriting and maintenance overhead
  • Architect applications to stay reliable even if some Web services go off-line
  • Scale applications to support the inclusion of Web services from multiple partners
  • Secure private information within Web services environments
  • Develop high-value mobile Web service applications
  • Includes a detailed case study

Whether you're an architect, developer, project leader, or manager, this book will help you deliver on the promise of Web services in your real-world enterprise environment.

About the Author

DR. SANDEEP CHATTERJEE is a seasoned technology expert and business professional with over a decade of hands-on contributions as a technologist, consultant, entrepreneur, and author. He is Chief Technology Officer of a startup focused on Web services delivery and management, and also serves as a Chief Technology Consultant for Fortune-100 and major not-for-profit organizations including Hewlett-Packard and ACCION International. Sandeep served on the Expert Group that specified the worldwide standard for mobile Web services, and was the lead of Hewlett-Packard's Web Services Mediation Platform. He was also Entrepreneur-in-Residence at FidelityCAPITAL, the VC arm of Fidelity Investments. Sandeep holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where his research in mobile systems was selected as one of the top 35 inventions in the 35-year history of MIT's Laboratory for Computer Science.

DR. JAMES WEBBER is an architect and Web Services fanatic at Arjuna Technologies where he works on Web services transaction and Grid computing technology. Prior to joining Arjuna Technologies, he was the lead developer with Hewlett-Packard working on their BTP-based Web Services Transactions product--the industry's first Web Services Transaction solution. An active speaker and Web Services proponent, Jim is a co-author of the WS-CAF suite of specifications. Jim holds a B.Sc. in Computing Science and Ph.D. in Parallel Computing both from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 592 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall (November 24, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0131401602
  • ISBN-13: 978-0131401600
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 1.4 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #905,667 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By W Boudville HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
Interested in designing a Web Service? But you have never done so? Well, texts have started to appear; the latest being this one by Chatterjee and Webber. It has several merits. Perhaps the strongest is that it does not take sides in the J2EE versus Microsoft's .NET debate. Wait a minute, you might say! You have heard enough about Web Services to know that it is vendor and platform independent, much like HTML, which is an industry standard. So how could a book on Web Services NOT be neutral?
Well, consider how HTML is a standard, but different browsers render an HTML page slightly differently. And HTML is pretty simple, remember. Now consider that Web Services is far more complex. The XML messages going to and from a WS are vendor neural. But, as is made clear by the examples in the book, the XML does not describe the processing logic implementation on a WS provider, by deliberate design, to make things loosely coupled. But if that provider has, say, a transaction capability, then you can get into the nuances of implementation.
Thus, if for example you get a book on J2EE WS, that may be fine. But it may also be hard to disentangle the truly neutral design details from the necessarily hairy implementation.
The neutrality of this book should be a design virtue to you. Look, if you are going to build a WS, you probably already have preferences for .NET or J2EE (or something else). So, indeed, do get a WS book specific to that platform. But consider this book as a good second opinion, and much cheaper than hiring a consultant.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Consider this - Web Services and SOAP is perhaps the only recallable evolution of technology that has witnessed the single largest involvement of standards bodies and industry bellwethers. The result? A puzzling plethora of proffered protocols that continues to confuse both sideliners and early adopters every day.

While managers are finding it increasingly difficult to understand the direction, developers are craving for clarity, consistency and a unified approach for WS adoption. "Give me the tools" they cry every day, while they keep adding to their "To Read" list a handful of new acronyms every week. The big question is, when can we build Rome, if at all?

With a gentle and brief (thank god!) introduction to underlying concepts such as SOAP, XML and UDDI, authors start talking about broader concerns - conversation, transaction, security, workflow, QoS and everything in between. While accentuating nuances of evolving standards and guessing the future trends, authors offer strategies, patterns, and tips on pitfalls to avoid. They skirt around the political interoperability issues around J2EE and .NET and focus purely on the standards. Architect's Note included at the end of every chapter makes title justified.

An implementation of WS-based ordering system presented as a case study concludes the book by bringing it all together through excellent step-by-step approach.

Although almost a year old, this book can be a survival guide for people in the trenches and the ROI-Savvy managers as well. It helps you tell the wheat from the chaff.

Ajith Kallambella
(...)
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on April 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
Over the past year, I have read quite a few books on Web Services, some good, others not so good... but this book really stands out.
The concepts were covered in sufficient details and in a very informal manner. It gives you a very good idea what you would need to consider when deciding to implement a SOA solution in your organization.
Highly Recommended!
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a surpringly well written, well organized book. Just about all of the major web service technologies are covered in just enough detail to give the reader a good understand of how they work and why they are needed. In addition, there are lots of simple, yet complete code samples that prepare the reader for detailed specifications and API documentation.
The book also includes background coverage of fundamental XML concepts, such as XML schema. It is worthwhile as a reference alone.
This book is much more than SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI (although these are covered in detail). This book includes advanced topics such as Web Services Conversation Language (WSCL), workflow, and transactions. The examples are easy to understand and complete.
Overall, this is a professionally written book for professionals.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on December 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a good book that starts where most other texts on Web Services stop. If you're really looking to see what's coming over the horizon, how you should be planning for it now, then I'd recommend this book. The text is clear and concise and importantly it doesn't assume everything is Java/J2EE or .NET based. It's fairly obvious that the authors know their subject well and want to let the reader know too!
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Bon Sy on February 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a MUST-HAVE book for anyone who is interested in web services. Web service is arguably the next-big-thing in web technology. Yet there is often confusion between web services that expose functionalities in an open standard and web interfaces that expose presentations in an open standard. Not only this book clarifies the confusion, it goes much further to provide much insightful information from different perspectives; e.g., design patterns in software engineering, application development for wireless devices and enterprise web services deployment. I just wish this book could have been available earlier in the market! My overall rating for this book is EXCELLENT!
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Developing Enterprise Web Services: An Architect's Guide: An Architect's Guide
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Developing Enterprise Web Services: An Architect's Guide: An Architect's Guide