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Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences Paperback – December 31, 2010

4.2 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Italian --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Galileo Galilei (1564 1642) was an Italian physicist, mathematician, philosopher, and astronomer. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 330 pages
  • Publisher: FQ Legacy Books (December 31, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004QO9ZFM
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,890,667 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book, but I don't think it's quite what the publisher thought it was. The previous reviewer is right in saying that this book does not support Copernicus' heliocentricism in any way. It is a discussion of motion, not astronomy. I would agree with the previous review in saying that the publishers probably meant to publish Dialogues Concerning Two Chief World Systems, which does in fact discuss heliocentricism and support Copernicus. How one manages to publish the wrong book I have no idea. Did no one read this before they published it? And how on earth did Stephen Hawking not notice either and write about the wrong book?

Well, it's a good book anyway, just not what they say it is. I recommend reading it if you want to understand the developments of science (esp. motion and mechanics), but if you want to learn about the Copernican Revolution and Galileo's conflict with the church, then the book you are looking for is Dialogues Concerning Two Chief World Systems. I would also recomment Galileo's Daughter as an amazing biography of Galileo based around a correspondence between him and his daughter.

Overall grade: A for the book, F for the publisher's description.
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Format: Paperback
One of the foundational works of modern science, the text speaks for itself in its lucidity and its grounding in method. I review it to address a criticism leveled at this book by the reviewers below.

These reviewers have erroneously perceived that these texts were mistakenly published, and that the original intent of the publisher was to present Galileo's original papers on heliocentrism and Copernicus, "Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World systems: Ptolemaic and Copernican". As the texts herein are Galileo's works on accelerated motion, the conclusion is drawn that a major mistake was made.

I believe this perception is based on marketing that associates the series with Copernicus' discoveries in particular.

The fact is that this book is part of a series, the arc of which is to present the current model of the physical world from Copernicus' discovery of the heliocentric solar system to Einstein's revelation that space and time are warped or displaced by mass and energy. Reviewers mistakenly believed that this Galilean text was intended to stand in support of Copernicus' discovery. In fact, this text is meant to show the development of the laws of motion, and is merely part of the overall series. Hawking's introduction recognizes this correctly, in contradiction to the misunderstanding of the reviewers below.

Those interested in the origins of modern science, the history of science, physics, or intellectual history may well wish to read through this gem.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There actually is confusion over this title. For one, this is not the work where Galileo (1564-1642) defends Copernicus (Heliocentrism) where the sun is the center of the universe or the solar system. That work is called "Dialogues Concerning Two Chief World Systems" (1632).

This work, "Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences" (1638), is about Galileo's experiments in bodies and motion.

The publisher is not wrong at all in calling this work the given title of "..Two New Sciences". If anything it is Galileo's and his original Publisher's fault for naming both works in such a similar fashion: "Dialogues Concerning Two....." The biggest difference is in the last words of the title.

For those concerned with Copernican/Aristarchus of Samos vs Aristotle/Ptolemaic debates (sun vs earth as the center of the universe/solar system) for which Galileo is known for please read Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (Modern Library Science). Its a good work, though Galileo did mock the Aristotle/Ptolemaic model by using a simpleton named "Simplicio" who was mathematically ignorant to represent Ptolemy's intensive and rigorous mathematical geocentric model. Of course there was no decisive evidence for heliocentrism in the time of Galileo so he should have been more careful. This also is what caused tensions between him and his supporter, Pope Urban VIII who had felt ridiculed because Galileo had put the Pope's views in the mouth of Simplicio. For the details on the Galileo affair, one can see
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Format: Kindle Edition
Galileo Galilei’s (1564-1642) book “Two new sciences” is a cornerstone of modern physics. One of the new sciences was kinetics. Galileo described the law for the accelerated motion of freely falling bodies. The other was the study of the strength of materials, a branch of mechanics.

Galileo started to compile his most important theoretical findings after he had been condemned to home arrest by the Catholic Church in 1633 due to his support for the heliocentric world system in "Two world systems" (1632). The work took a couple of years. The manuscript was smuggled to Leiden where the book was published in 1638.

In the book, the discussions are held by the same three persons as in Galileo's previous “Two world systems”. This time Galileo was anxious to present his scientific findings, and did not put much emphasis on the discussions. The book is much more mathematical than the “Two world systems”.

My favorites are the chapters on uniform and accelerated motion (especially the beginning of the third day, pages 116-142), and the chapter on the motion of projectiles (especially the beginning of the fourth day, pages 189-199). I enjoyed going through Galileo’s mathematical proofs. At several places, I really had to work hard to follow the track of the proofs.

In mechanics, I was delighted to read Galileo’s thought about the binding forces within metals. He presented as his passing and immature thought that the metals might contain a huge number of tiny vacuums (vacua) (first day, page 15). He was wrong in this, but this does not matter. The important thing is that this shows that Galileo was interested in understanding the phenomena also at the tiniest scale.
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