Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.95
  • Save: $4.63 (29%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Dice Man has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: 4th printing. Pages clean with no marks, 1 pg has crease; spine very good; cover has moderate edge wear, a few small bumps. Ships in poly bag.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Dice Man Paperback – May 1, 1998

4.2 out of 5 stars 109 customer reviews

See all 18 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.32
$9.21 $3.46

Featured Titles in Fiction
Beloved
Beloved
Beloved
$11.32 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Dice Man
  • +
  • The Remains of the Day
Total price: $20.24
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

'Touching, ingenious and beautifully comic' Anthony Burgess 'Hilarious and well-written... sex always seems to be an option' Time Out 'Brilliant... very impressive' Colin Wilson --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Luke Rhinehart has written four other acclaimed novels: Matari, Long Voyage Back, Adventures of Wim and The Search for the Dice Man, sequel to the bestselling The Dice Man. He lives in the USA. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: The Overlook Press (May 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0879518642
  • ISBN-13: 978-0879518646
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.8 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (109 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #147,134 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
According to Time Out, this book was one of the most fashionable novels of the early 1970s; and Anthony Burgess, the author of the unsettling "A Clockwork Orange" (1962), graced it with the comment "touching, ingenious and beautifully comic."
"The Dice Man" is a dark comedy, violent and hilarious at the same time; an upbeat precursor to the much grimmer "American Psycho" (1991) by Bret Easton Ellis, and the similarly satirical "The Elementary Particles" (1998) by the French author Michel Houellebecq. With a light touch and in mischievously entertaining fashion, the book plays with the fundamentals of the way we understand ourselves: rationality, identity, reality; in sum, all the ways in which we construct coherence from chance, or something from nothing.
Luke Rhinehart, the author (in fact, the real author's pseudonym) and narrator of the book, is the ultimate unreliable narrator. Luke's actions are largely dictated by chance. He writes down alternative actions and then tosses dice to determine which action to take. The result, he claims, is freedom to live different sides of his personality. As an author, for example, he lets the dice decide what he should write in his fictional autobiography with the title "The Dice Man" and what not; and the dice decide when he should lie and when not. Consequently, he announces on page one that he is the author of "the lovely first-rate pornographic novel, Naked Before the World" only to reveal much later in the book that the dice ordered him not to write about this piece of fiction in "The Dice Man." Too bad, dear reader.
Read more ›
2 Comments 71 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
As usual, the dice said I should tell you what I thought about this book. There are several me's, and each one has a different opinion, or at least would like to say some things to you.
So I take a pen and a piece of paper and write down the options. If I roll...
1-4) I play around a little, and say this book was terrible, no explanations. There's that little part of me that likes to do a few pranks. 1 star.
5-6) I choose to take a civilized and wannabe-pro approach and use a lot of difficult words describing how intelligent and witty The Dice Man was. 5 stars.
7-17) I say that I really loved this book. I go to the extremities and use a whole lotta superlatives and exclamation marks. It was hilarious at most times, and thought-provoking at all times. The thing about giving your every side a chance to live it's life, to deliberately submit to a sort of a schitzophrenia being a good thing...interesting, most interesting. 5 stars, absolutely!
18-29) I take a very dice man-ish approach and choose to tell you my opinion on this book by describing the selection process. 5 stars.
30-32) I give up and never say an opinion on The Dice Man.
33) I "accidentally" write about a wrong book.
34-35) I write my review always one key stroke to the right. Q is W, W is E, E is R and so on.
36) I write my review in the same manner as described in one part of the The Dice Man.
Then I take two green dice, say a little prayers for the Die and throw them. 21. The Dice have ruled that I should write about my decision-making experience.
Although I'm here violating the laws of all uncertainty, I'd suggest you don't leave whether you read this novel or not to the whims of the dice. It might open up many doors. And change your life.
Or offer a new way of having fun, at least. 1) Read it. 2) Read it. 3) Read it twice. 4) Read it. 5) Read it. 6) Read it.
5 Comments 33 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I feel about "Dice Man" a bit like I feel about Ayn Rand's novels: Both begin in our real world and proceed to carry us towards an alternate (superior?) life structure envisioned by the author. I can't see either vision as a complete blueprint for re-forming my life, and yet the ideas are extremely thought-provoking and powerfully expressed. I'm glad I read "Dice Man"; it's unique. It's also very enjoyable, if you have a taste for dark and absurd humor.
Interestingly, the story is told from the first person point of view of a New York psychologist named Luke Rhinehart. That's the name of the actual author of the book (a pen name). There is also a sequel, "Search for the Dice Man", although that is only in print in England. You can get it from Amazon's United Kingdom store, www.amazon.co.uk.
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a must read.... all the reviews are good... I should like this book.

But I'm going to be honest here.... I did not like it. For one thing it could have been shortened a great deal without anyone noticing or missing anything. I felt some explicit scenes were inserted simply to liven up a boring narrative. Writing is like painting you need to know when enough is enough to make a masterpiece and this author, apparently, did not receive that memo.

The funny thing is, I was recommended this book by a friend who thought it hilarious that I sometimes make decisions randomly by drawing pieces of paper out of a salad bowl- all with different options written on them. Which eliminates the possibility that I'm just a super rigid freak, right? This also wasn't required reading for school. That brings me to the point- what exactly did I miss? What is that thing that everyone loves so much about this book? In comparison to this Slaugher-house Five really is a masterpiece- if your in the market for new ideas to mull over. This rating thing I guess its all relative to what else you've just read.

**If you disagree with my review plz refrain from voting on it... this is my opinion which is subject to change at any given moment.... place a persuasive argument inducing that change, intstead. :)

EDIT: I just realized something, a few days after reading this book. This book is a look at alternative to suicide. Main character contemplates physical suicide. At the last minute comes across a different method of suicide that will allow him to commit his suicide and still live.... he lets the die govern and commits social suicide. So basically, this book may be a statement on "if your miserable why not seek change instead of death." Thought I'd share that with you all.
1 Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Dice Man
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Dice Man