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The Dip (When to Quit and When to Stick) Audio CD – Abridged, 2008

4.0 out of 5 stars 459 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Do You Zoom! Inc. (2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0979433703
  • ISBN-13: 978-0979433702
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 4.9 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (459 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,670,810 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By R S Cobblestone VINE VOICE on May 22, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The Dip, by Seth Godin, is a very small book (80 pages) that says, in short:

- Winners quit (regroup. cut their losses, switch gears) whenever necessary on the path to winning.

- Be the best, and the world comes knocking at your door.

- Work through the pain, because the reward is waiting for you further down the road.

If any of these comments/suggestions seem unclear, take at look at The Dip.

If you understand already, you've just saved $12.95.

This is not a "how-to" book. It is meant to be a motivational piece of writing. Work hard... the financial rewards are greatest for the hardest worker. Work through "the dip," or that period where the gains don't seem to be coming as quickly as you'd like. Don't stop running the marathon at mile 25.

Look, the very successful don't read these books. The barely successful can't read these books. So it is written for the somewhat successful, or the person who is looking for "something" else. Here's the shortened version: "Work and study hard. Don't give up. Persevere. However, consider alternatives. Share this book with others."

Don't get me wrong... this is not, in any sense, a bad book, or a book giving bad advice. To me, the advice seems pretty obvious.

Work hard, play hard, and be well.
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Format: Hardcover
Much of Godin's advice makes sense, although it's not especially original. Know when you're going to quit and have an exit strategy. Don't get stuck in a cul-de-sac: a dead end.

Those who focus on a market or skill do reap greater rewards than those who generalize. Among scholars, picking a tiny slice and expanding will reap big rewards. Remove distractions from your life.

Godin's power curves are very convincing. There is a huge difference between Number 1 and Number 2 when you look at ice cream flavors and box office sales. But sometimes a decision to rank lower can be strategic. Some gurus advise against aiming to be Number 1 or 2 on a search engine, because you'll get more tire-kicking clicks.

Much of Godin's advice makes sense for individual as well as corporate career planning. Most careers have dips. Many people find themselves in cul de sacs. What he calls "the cliff" resembles a comfort zone: "The longer you do it, the harder to quit." As a career consultant, I think the cliff is far more common than Godin suggests.

Two problems with this book:
(1) In real life, it's often hard to distinguish between a cul de sac and a dip and careers often morph from one to the other without warning.

In fact, the book's examples inadvertently demonstrate this ambiguity. On page 38, Godin suggests that the helpful mailroom clerk might rise to CEO. On page 62, Doug gets branded because he's been with the company too long: everyone remembers when he started.

We should note that Jeffrey Pfeffer's book, What Were They Thinking, actually contradicts Godin's tips on pages 38-39: Pfeffer suggests that CEO wannabes *not* suck it up but instead stand out.
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3 Comments 132 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Hardcover
I read the entire book, and feel it could have been a great book if it deliver on the promise of the title of knowing when to quit and knowing when to stick with something. It does not. The Dip is about the place between the exciting new start of something, and the slump before mastery, or what Godin says "Being the best in the world."

This book in my opinion is in the dip. It had a good start, but is far, far from being the best in the world on this important life changing subject. What the book needed badly is tools for evaluating when you should quit and when you should stick it out. This book felt like more of a rant then a serious study from an expert on the subject who has real life experience or who has worked through the process with a good number of people and learned effective tools to share with others.

It seem like Godin quit while still in the dip with writing this book. Maybe he should have followed his own advise and stuck it out and created something great, or quit before he published this book.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
OK, I keep buying Godin's books expecting more. But, all I get is content that seems like a well constructed blog posting. Seth is a very good writer and communicator, but this book added zero to my life. It is a very short book about quitting stuff you're not good at and sticking with (or starting) things you're not good at. Life is short. The longer you dwell in mediocrity, the longer it will take you to become exceptional. Contrary to the book's claim, it doesn't really teach you WHEN to quit or when to stick...other than when the goal is worthwhile. Such an examination takes more than just reading some words. There is very little thought-provoking content here. It seems like a summarized rip-off of Marcus Buckhingham and the "strengths" books...which are excellent and unlike this book...may change your life. Godin is well respected in marketing, but how many more collections of blogs (small is the new big), other people's works (purple cow), and short discourses about the obvious can he keep putting out? It's like people who compile ezines.
8 Comments 203 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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