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Discover Nature in Winter (Discover Nature Series) Paperback – July 1, 1998

5.0 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Scientific American

This latest entry in the Discover Nature series features "knowing and doing" activities to keep budding naturalists of all ages busy in the short, cold days and long, dark nights of winter. With experiments and observations for everyone, covering wildlife and wildflowers, stars and snowflakes.

About the Author

Elizabeth Lawlor is author of the Discover Nature series of books, which are illustrated by Pat Archer.

Pat Archer is an experienced birder and artist living in Connecticut.
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Product Details

  • Series: Discover Nature Series
  • Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Stackpole Books; 1st edition (July 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 081172719X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811727198
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #510,190 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
I always wondered what happened during winter - how does so much spring forth in springtime when its so quiet over the winter. This book gives us a terrific foundation for understanding all that. There are chapters on trees and what's going on inside them, "winter weeds," insects and how they overwinter in their different forms, and mammals and what they're doing to survive. Its just so absolutely amazing. There are activities throughout the book as well so it doesn't need to be just a nice winter read but a nice chance to get outside and explore too!
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I bought a new copy of this when I was in Alaska and my copy is still up there in storage -- but I am again living in a wintery area with more access to the outside and was looking for the hands on nature-experience science lessons for the upcoming months and so bought a used copy of it to last till I can get mine back. This book covers a little bit about everything northern winter: , snow snowpack and temperature, snow as insulator, the winter night sky, identifying plants in the winter, finding insects (something I don't normally think about in the winter), feeding birds, finding and identifying old nests. It has a lot of information to whet the appetite on subjects and to stand alone if all you want is a general overview of the subjects. The material is worth reading but the activities are what make it come alive. We do this as a family and it brings back memories of being out and about with my grandmother when I was little, encouraging me to share more family history with my children. If you live in other areas [besides climates that are snowy in winter and have forested areas] it may not be as useful but it could still stand as a bit of a guide as to what to put together for your children in your particular area.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased this book as part of my growing homeschooling resource library and am thrilled with its quality and inspiring nature-study ideas.

Bundle up in something warm and go explore the winter world outside. This guide provides information on all sorts of interesting seasonal topics as well as some great activities for kids and parents to try together for hands-on learning. Instead of being stuck inside, get out and take advantage of winter's lessons: examine snowflakes, measure snowfall, look for abandoned squirrel and bird nests, identify trees without the help of their distinctive leaves, catalog animal tracks, and feed neighborhood birds to start.

Part nature guide, part textbook, and part activity book, this really does offer a unique take on nature in winter that looks at more than just the snow.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I would give six stars to this seller if I could. My book is perfect, it arrived far sooner than I expected it. And...I find enclosed a hand written Thank You note. Thank you so much! God bless you
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good ideas
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