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The Divine Comics: A Vaudeville Show in Three Acts Paperback – November 15, 2011

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Philip Lee Williams is the author of
fifteen volumes of fiction, poetry, and
essays, and his work has won numerous
national and regional awards. Books
& Culture, a national literary journal,
named his most recent book with
Mercer University Press, The Flower
Seeker: An Epic Poem of William
Bartram, Book of the Year for 2010.
And his 2004 Civil War novel, A Distant
Flame, won the Michael Shaara Prize as
best Civil War novel published in that
year. He lives near Athens, Georgia,
with his wife and daughter and taught
creative writing at the University of
Georgia before his retirement in 2010.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1000 pages
  • Publisher: Mercer University Press; 1 edition (November 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0881462616
  • ISBN-13: 978-0881462616
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 2.4 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,929,724 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
"In a great comedy, we are always made aware of the darkness in life, but the ending must be happy or it's not a comedy. A man's journey to wholeness is therefore most rightly named `The Comedy,' for the end is the final awareness of that love which is the joy of the universe." - Helen M. Luke in "Dark Wood to White Rose: Journey and Transformation in Dante's `Divine Comedy'"

Philip Lee Williams' magnificent "The Divine Comics: a Vaudeville Show in Three Acts" begins and ends with Whitman Bentley, a young man with gangly legs who's been dreaming again, perhaps to escape the fact that among the eccentrics at The School of Music, he "may be the weakest, torn with every phobia in the catalogue."

Since the novel's back-cover informs readers that Williams' novel reimagines and updates Dante's "The Divine Comedy," we know going in that Whitman Bentley will, to put it crudely, go to hell and back, after--as Dante might put it--the eccentric second-string symphony conductor awakes to find himself in a dark wood where the right road is wholly lost and gone.

En route to the ending of "The Divine Comics," (which is pure poetry and white rose wonderment) the reader--as well as Williams' huge cast of dysfunctional characters--may sense that that there is no right road and that the trickster gods (known as the Divine Comics, aka "The Lords of the Inner Kingdom") are plagued with every manner of dark joke in the catalogue. Ah, but the chapters in "The Divine Comics" are called skits for a reason.

The novel's three sections, "Fire," "Earth" and "Air," match Dante's "Inferno," "Purgatorio," and "Paradiso.
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Format: Paperback
"In a great comedy, we are always made aware of the darkness in life, but the ending must be happy or it's not a comedy. A man's journey to wholeness is therefore most rightly named `The Comedy,' for the end is the final awareness of that love which is the joy of the universe." - Helen M. Luke in "Dark Wood to White Rose: Journey and Transformation in Dante's `Divine Comedy'"

Philip Lee Williams' magnificent "The Divine Comics: a Vaudeville Show in Three Acts" begins and ends with Whitman Bentley, a young man with gangly legs who's been dreaming again, perhaps to escape the fact that among the eccentrics at The School of Music, he "may be the weakest, torn with every phobia in the catalogue."

Since the novel's back-cover informs readers that Williams' novel reimagines and updates Dante's "The Divine Comedy," we know going in that Whitman Bentley will, to put it crudely, go to hell and back, after--as Dante might put it--the eccentric second-string symphony conductor awakes to find himself in a dark wood where the right road is wholly lost and gone.

En route to the ending of "The Divine Comics," (which is pure poetry and white rose wonderment) the reader--as well as Williams' huge cast of dysfunctional characters--may sense that that there is no right road and that the trickster gods (known as the Divine Comics, aka "The Lords of the Inner Kingdom") are plagued with every manner of dark joke in the catalogue. Ah, but the chapters in "The Divine Comics" are called skits for a reason.

The novel's three sections, "Fire," "Earth" and "Air," match Dante's "Inferno," "Purgatorio," and "Paradiso.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Report abuse

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