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on April 13, 2015
Dr. Jauhar is a gifted writer and would love to have him be among my panel of consultants. He paints a picture of current day medicine that is accurate regarding the underlying financial and regulatory pressures. However, I can't believe the corruption and fraud is as bad as his experiences have been. i just can't see this happening to this degree. The main disappointment is the ending...it just sort of ends. No real lesson, no solution; he just sort of gives up. Just like I kind of gave up. All he did was expose the public of what our work climate has become. He did that well, but geez, I wanted some hope.
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on May 3, 2015
This is an interesting book, especially for those sympathetic to the challenges facing practicing physicians in the middle of their careers. I am one of those physicians, and personally appreciate the author's concerns as he navigates his way through a profession that is under pressure of constant change. There are no answers hidden in this book, but many thoughtful insights; maybe not universally valid, but valid to the author; and illustrated by patients and family. I recommend it to anyone interested in learning a little bit more about the emotional state of practicing physicians.
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on June 9, 2015
Enjoyed dr Jauhar's account of his journey as a fledging cardiology attending struggling between the employee and private praxis roles, urban vs suburban living, as well as the private and professional life.
I appreciate the sincerity of his description of the business side of medicine. Albeit, I suspect his experience cannot be generalized, hence likely represents an oversaturated medical market of the New York City area. Some of his frustrations are stemming from the difficulty of attempting to practice in this environment. It is hard to keep your integrity (and to keep being a knight) and still not be outcompeted by a see of knaves.
As some other readers noted, his experiences should have been different somewhere less overserved like North Dakota. Of course it is hard to leave the niceties of the big city life and make the compromise what his father might have made.
I think the book was helpful for me to see my own life of working as a cardiologist from a different perspective as well.
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on April 30, 2015
The author identifies many of serious problems that place the American Health Care system near the bottom among developed countries. Malpractice lawyers, greedy pharmaceutical companies, corporate hospitals and even scammers disguised as doctors could care less about the health of their patients but instead are focused on ways to extract dollars from the system. The author points out these flaws but unfortunately overwhelms them with his whining about his personal life. The book could have been much better, and half as long, had he stayed focused on the issues at hand and potential ways to overcome them.
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on October 13, 2014
I started reading this book with some apprehension after reading some previous reviews suggesting Dr Jauhar placed too much emphasis on his personal life and suggested he should "get a life" and perhaps get out of medicine altogether. I too feel he dwels a lot on his personal life and the effects a medical career has on family life but this is a reality and to completely ignore it's effect would be a disservice.

When the government and insurance companies got involved in the payment of services, the practice of medicine changed to seeing many patients per hour. Dr Jauhar points out this problem and how today's physician never gets to know their patient. Once again the patient looses!

I felt it was a well written book and would recommend it to anyone interested in the field of medicine an to get some understanding of where we are and where we may be heading.
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on August 2, 2017
Really honest book from a medical provider drags at the end a bit but it was a good story of the disillusionment one faces when practicing medicine.
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on August 3, 2017
Middle drags a bit. There are good stories and lots of information however. Recommend for all medical professionals. In my humble opinion.
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on January 7, 2015
This book was very interesting and honest at the beginning. As it went on, the strength of the topic weakened and my attention waned. it wasn't a bad book by any stretch; just seemed like it was too drawn out and watered down.
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on October 19, 2014
I found this book extremely interesting. Living in a rural area I wonder why he would stay back east where a practicing cardiologist has so much competition and struggles to rely on referrals. In Wyoming, we would love to have a few more cardiologists practice. Waiting lists can be up to 6 weeks to get in to see a specialist.

Dr. Jauhar opened my eyes to new side of medical reimbursement. Many specialties are going to see the inadequacies of reformed healthcare.
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on June 8, 2017
Good to know what medicine is like now, referrals and all. Worth reading
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