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Does Anybody Else Look Like Me?: A Parent's Guide To Raising Multiracial Children Paperback – March 31, 2004

4.4 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Nakazawa has skillfully combined anecdotal research with a strong knowledge of childhood and educational development philosophy to provide this useful guide."

About the Author

Donna Jackson Nakazawa has been a regular contributor to AARP's My Generation, as well as to Working Mother, Modern Maturity, New Woman, and Baby Talk. She is married to a Japanese-American and has two children. She lives in Annapolis, Maryland.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press (March 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0738209503
  • ISBN-13: 978-0738209500
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #411,885 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Being a multiracial woman myself (and mother to a multiracial child), I was very excited about this book. As the author adeptly points out, there's really very little out there - practically nothing - speaking to the task of raising multiracial children. It is important and significant that Nakazawa tackled this subject and gave it presence. She clearly did her research and has included an incredible amount of good information.

However.

By the time I finished reading this book, I had a weird, uncomfortable feeling. Something seemed off. If a monoracial parent asked me to recommend a book on multiraciality - I'm sorry to say I wouldn't recommend this one. The actual, authentic voices of multiracial peoples are not well represented here. An instruction manual written by a White woman on how to raise children of color is ultimately very treacherous. For instance, Nakazawa offers specific race wording and phrasing for interacting with children, often citing herself as a role model/example. Putting words in someone's mouth feels like robbing them of their own unique voice. It denies them the opportunity to discover their own language and potentially invalidates their specific cultures/worldview. And I have to say, as a woman of color, I reacted poorly to being given race scripts by a member of the dominant racial class.

Unfortunately there is also some misinformation about early learning and race. "Race," Nakazawa claims, "Is really a grown-up notion that is meaningless to the vast majority of preschoolers" (12). In fact, this is not true.
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Format: Paperback
As the mother of 4 beautiful biracial children, I was delighted to find this intelligent, realistic book. My children are often asked "What are you?" and attempts are made to label them as Arabic, Latin, Greek,Black, Italian, etc, etc. This makes it difficult for them when they are at ages where all of us were trying to "find ourselves". My daughter has also had a difficult time, often meeting women who instantly dislike her based on her appearance alone. This book was refreshing and helped me to realize others go thru the same. I was amazed at the amount of research and fact finding this author included. The everyday anecdotes was also most truthful, speaking from personal experience. great find for anyone who knows, loves, interacts with those of more than 1 race!!
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Format: Paperback
As a Multiracial teen this book helped me navigate the strange waters I found myself drowning in. It doesn't read like a unrealistic "turn that frown upside down" Dr. Seuss book; instead the subject is approached in a straight forward manner. This book contains IMO the most valid sense of what makes the difference between a healthy self identify and self hate/defensive racism (when you come to loathe/distance yourself from a group to protect yourself from further harm)in mixed race kids. All my friends now starting multi hued families that come to me for advice, receive this book as a gift. As I wish some kind soul would've done for my parents.

I strongly recommend this book to parents of multiracial children *especially if your child will garner a lot of (confusing/unwanted) attention based on their physical differences from their peers/ or physical comparison to their parents* You can't distract them with toys/games to keep them from processing incidents or procrastinate addressing the issue, forever. Children are more observant then we give them credit for and the questions that go unanswered speak volumes.

It's also a cathartic read for us mixed adults that had to figure it out on our own. It shed a lot of light on how I processed and internalized confusing/awkward events as a child and convinced me to let go of some of the child-like logic/hang ups still effecting me.

The only way to deal with some complications are to face them in the light of day for what they are. We do the best we have with the tools we have at the moment. Sometimes the quick fixes we use to cope, can become a larger problems in the future if we don't evolve our thinking and problem solving skills. This book prompted the catalyst that took me from tragic little mixed girl to the grounded multi ethnic woman I am today. Give the book a try, it'll be money and time well spent.
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Format: Paperback
I've read all of the books that have been suggested by adoption professionals & adoptive families about how to support an interracially adopted child & I have never seen this book listed. I was given
"Does Anybody Else Look Like Me? A Parent's Guide To Raising Multiracial Children" by a friend who has multiracial birth children. The cover didn't lead me to think it would be a great source of information for us. Our youngest child is adopted from China. I've read a few other books on the topic of multiracial families & gleaned some useful information but most of the read was disjointed in application to our family. The book sat on my bedside table for awhile but one day I picked it up & couldn't put it down. I was marking pages, taking notes & was proufoundly grateful that this book exsisted. It is truly a great wealth of information about the experiences that children born and adopted interracially/multiracially experience with solid advice on how to support your child/ren throughout their childhood & into adulthood. This book should be a must read for parents of interracial/multiracial children--no matter if you choose to build your family through adoption, birth or both. I wish that the title or front cover would indicate that this book applies to both multiracial children & interracially ADOPTED children so that the adoption community would discover it on a greater scale and make it a must read. Until then I will do my part spreading the word about this amazing book. It is my favorite gift to give families that can benefit from its read.
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