Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Doing Girlfriend Theology: God-Talk with Young Women Paperback – April 30, 2005

3.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$90.49 $0.20

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Pilgrim Pr (April 30, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 082981616X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0829816167
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,786,210 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Keri C. Onan-Blake on August 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
Despite a strong outline and excellent chapter titles, the book feels and reads too much like a dissertation and is not engaging. The actual stories were better but there were not enough.

For our part we tried to read the book as a group of women wanting to sink our teeth into a "beginning" theology book that would raise questions for our reflection as we try to be intentional about our spiritual journey.

Perhaps a "Girlfriend" Theology Devotional book would be good.
2 Comments 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book Doing Girlfriend Theology introduces its readers to the image of God. For feminist theology, it made a great contribution toward depicting God as a woman giving birth and using inclusive language both masculine and feminine. The author, Dori Baker writes about her adolescence as a silent girl, shares collected life stories from others who have found their voices, and translates the resources of women's theological thought into the context of female adolescence (17). Baker offers new insights about identifying our callings and taking steps toward finding our vocation as a member of the faith community.

Baker attempts to awaken her readers to "the problems of silenced selves, missing voices, and girls in the footnotes" (17). When reflecting on their lives, the girls recover their human dignity. Through sharing of life stories, several kinds of images of God came out, not only a male image, but feminist, womanist, liberation, and process theologians might all endorse. After finding their identities, they would change from making meaning to taking action and building solidarity to heal another's oppression as echoing a major theme of liberation theology. Thus, image of God is as community in relationship because theology is communal rather than individual.

This book introduces an inclusive and diverse image of God rather than emphasizing the image of God's fatherhood. The author points out that God's imaginations came from cultures and social boundaries. To understand the image of God, Baker makes connections between God, our lives and the world as a magic cure.

Baker presents two additional emancipatory theologies: mujerista theology, a Latina frame of reference, and Asian-feminist theology.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Grinenko Baker provides a thoughtful and useful model for doing liberation-minded theological reflection with groups of adolescent women and others. She takes seriously traditions of storytelling, and also provides useful and respectful readings of liberation feminists from a wide variety of backgrounds to inform her work. As a seminarian, I see this book as a model of the theory/practice combination that can be so theologically potent.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
As I first picked up this book I thought, "this is going to be fun". Who hasn't had a girlfriend who also didn't want some theological assistance? However, "Doing Girlfriend Theology" (2005 paperback) has suggested a difference- the profound need for adolescent God-thought!

It is a genuine delight to hear of American teens' resiliency and fortitude in the face of societal victimization. Baker's "female clusters" groups, where everyone tells her story, reminds that teen girls need a safe place to talk. The author's notion for safe sharing is honestly brilliant and necessary for "doing" theology, (or as Girlfriend's Theology suggests "from making meaning to taking action").

Addressing the problems of girl teens' missing voice (as a footnote to contemporary theology) Baker identifies feminist theology's 30-year disregard for teenage girls. She admits early on that the research result for this book was "to lead girls to more fulfilling lives because of a connection to their feminist inheritance" (page 20). Girlfriend Theology anticipates assisting marginalized teen girls in reclaiming their God-given humanity.

One possible downside of the book is Baker's cluster muster. Her group composition decisions present the potential for reducing participant theological flexibility and spontaneity. (The bigger the group, the smaller the involvement.) Additionally, the book has the feel of a teenage philosophical "self-helper" rather than of divine discovery instrument.

This IS a fun read! You'll laugh and you'll cry as you hear these narratives. And you will wonder at God's special giving to this diverse, yet composed, forgotten stratum of the human experience- white teen girls.

This book is recommended to everyone interested in emergent 21st century theology, feminist theology, and the American adolescent female experience.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse